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SCRYPTREADER
10-28-2005, 12:52 PM
quick question re script coverages... when you have a moment, would you please share with everyone (briefly) the possible outcomes when a script is covered... i understand there is pass... pass with notes... etc... and also give us some ruff %'s of what you and others see in each category.

when i briefly read for working title some years ago... i saw 12 scripts in a 3 week period (all pass)... i understand from other readers who were reading for them at the same time, they had 23 out of 24 passes with the exception of "bad santa" which i recall was a "consider with notes".

just some flavor to remind us how futile this all is.

thanx

PoisonIvy
10-28-2005, 01:24 PM
quick question re script coverages... when you have a moment, would you please share with everyone (briefly) the possible outcomes when a script is covered... i understand there is pass... pass with notes... etc... and also give us some ruff %'s of what you and others see in each percentage.

when i briefly read for working title some years ago... i saw 12 scripts in a 3 week period (all pass)... i understand from other readers who were reading for them at the same time, they had 23 out of 24 passes with the exception of "bad santa" which i recall was a "consider with notes".

just some flavor to remind us how futile this all is.

thanx

It varies by company. Studio coverage usually rates Premise, Script, and Writer (Pass/Consider with res/Consider/Recommend); I've never heard of a pass with notes (not sure who would give them, and coverage is confidential). Readers are explicitly told to never recommend anything, so consider is the best you can get. If it's a pass (most of the stuff that comes in) no one else reads it, and the exec passes on it. It it is a consider the executive may read it if this is something they are looking for. There are execs who prefer to read things that are submitted to them, especially if they have a personal relationship with the agent. I usually see a consider on at least one of the three categories at least once a week but that rarely goes anywhere. If the writer is well known he may be considered for assignments... It's a very tough makret right now...

SCRYPTREADER
10-28-2005, 03:51 PM
there ya go... thank you.

BetterThanNormal
10-29-2005, 12:28 AM
PI and SR

What happens if a script comes across your desk that is strong in many ways (great concept, good dialog, good characters) but may have some structural flaws? Where do you go from there?

BTN

SCRYPTREADER
10-29-2005, 01:28 AM
PI and SR

What happens if a script comes across your desk that is strong in many ways (great concept, good dialog, good characters) but may have some structural flaws? Where do you go from there?

BTN

I don't read for $ anymore... In the old days I would do a "pass w/notes"... that meant i know you won't like it as it is but if this that or the other was different, it might be worthwhile for the following person, reason or whatever.

as Ivy has said, "pass w/notes" wasn't the proper designation - I just hated seeing something with potential go directly into the trash.

BetterThanNormal
10-29-2005, 11:23 PM
Thanks SR

I was trying to gauge H'woods tolerance for such things, how they would respond to something like this. I suppose it would also depend on the amount of flaws and the degree to which they impact the script.

The struggle continues...

BTN

LIMAMA
10-30-2005, 08:55 AM
"I was trying to gauge H'woods tolerance for such things, how they would respond to something like this. I suppose it would also depend on the amount of flaws and the degree to which they impact the script."

This is like asking oh, after I sent the script out, I suddenly discovered typos and grammatical no-no's, is it going to make a difference?

You should NOT be sending out scripts which have flaws in it in the hopes that the producer will overlook it because the basic concept is a winner and will make them tons of moolah.

No script is perfect. Every reader or producer will have their take on a script.

My job as a writer is to make my work as ding free as possible, the best that I can make it while keeping in mind that movie making is a collaberative process. I almost think of myself as an architect and my scripts as blueprints upon which others can build and add to. But you gotta have a solid foundation in the first place.

IMO, if anyone is sending out a script and already anticipating responses other than consider or recommend (ie passes with notes, consider the writer, etc.), the script isn't ready to be marketed.

That's my opinion, I'm sure others can and will differ.

Joe Unidos
10-31-2005, 07:52 AM
Exactly, you can't control whether or not it's the best screenplay out there, but you sure as hell can --and better-- make sure it's the best YOU ARE CAPABLE OF CREATING.

SCRYPTREADER
11-01-2005, 03:38 AM
Exactly, you can't control whether or not it's the best screenplay out there, but you sure as hell can --and better-- make sure it's the best YOU ARE CAPABLE OF CREATING.


amen.

joe... y don't u give us a taste of what re-write hell is like. that is re-writes after u have done what u thought was your best work.

the floor is yours.