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MrQwerty
07-02-2004, 06:35 PM
Right, I've completed five tight screenplays that I'm more than happy with. My screenwriting chums (whom I’ve met via this great website) also like them and believe it’s about time I took things to the next level… so… What do I do next?

WritingPro
07-02-2004, 08:00 PM
You need to start marketing your scripts... Try email queries, and/or snail mail queries... you can also enter screenplay contests.

It's all about exsposure now, because there are a gang of people out her with scripts -- trying to get noticed. For example, I sent a email query and now I have a really great management company looking to take me on as a client.

Just market yourself as much as you can...

GoodLuck! 8)

MrQwerty
07-02-2004, 08:31 PM
So is the next step basically a case of querying agents until one bites?

Anyone got any good tips on attracting agents?

boski62
07-02-2004, 11:44 PM
First off, congratulations on finishing and polishing five scripts, and even more kudos for having the patience to hold off marketing until now! I know that's the advice most of us get, but few newbies have the self-control to actually follow it. (I know I didn't) :D

You're in a cool position, the way I see it. With five completed scripts, I'd definitely focus on attracting agents exclusively for a while. If they like one, you've got the goods to back up their inevitable request to see more.

With five, too, you've got a neat option with your queries. You could make up 5 pitch paragraphs--one for each script--and send out 5 different queries, each pitching a single script, matching them as best you can to each agent. Then see which query generates the most requests. This might tell you which script has the most commercial/broadly appealing concept.

(Just to clarify, I think you should only pitch one script per query. Opinions, I'm sure, differ on this, but that's my vote...)

You could also try a strategy of querying each script one at a time, working down your list of five over a period of months...

Make sure you're query is strong! I think this is super important. The query letter really is your first writing sample. Sound like a pro. I'd use the same folks who gave you feedback on your scripts to help polish the pitch paragraphs for your scripts. You've got something like 50-100 words to hook the agent's interest in your story, so make that paragraph a grabber. (I've written a lengthy post on this somewhere on this board, but I recommend studying and stealing from blurb copy on books and movie boxes to help you craft your pitch paragraph. With a little work, you can make your story sound like the latest bestseller or the hottest new release.)

Remember, too, agents are the hardest of the bunch for a newbie to hook, so don't get discouraged if they don't respond well. They're just the first group. If you're not happy with their response, you just switch to querying producers and managers. I guarantee your response/request rate will be better with these folks. Which can work out just fine, because the interest and contacts you get from them can lead right back to getting you an agent.

Good Luck

Hamboogul
07-05-2004, 12:20 AM
Right, I've completed five tight screenplays that I'm more than happy with. My screenwriting chums (whom I’ve met via this great website) also like them and believe it’s about time I took things to the next level… so… What do I do next?


First, most DDers (possibly self included) are so removed from the industry that they wouldn't know what the next level is.

Second, that being said, the next level is to hone your craft. Unless you are the Michelangelo of screenwriting, the chances are that your scripts could greatly benefit by you increasing your skills. Why not put those scripts in a drawer and work on other scripts, read great scripts, etc. Come back to the scripts a year later and you'll see flaws in them that you may not have had.


But that's just me...

filmcarver
07-05-2004, 08:23 AM
Decide which script is the most marketable commercially, and get one or two coverages or a pro reader to look it over; SOMEONE who has the experience to give you good notes.

That is the next level IMO. "Chums" is fine, but now it's time for some real input and a good solid rewrite.

Don't be surprised if things that are pointed out are greater in number than you ever imagined. If not, then congrats and roll on ahead to submissions and phone calls.

good luck

Totiwos
05-08-2005, 03:51 PM
Just curious about what ended up doing and if you were satisfied with your approach.

(It's awesome to be able to search on this board.)