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jaffa
07-02-2006, 06:26 PM
I am submitting a script to a new screenwriters program. They want to know what Shoot Gauge and Finish Gauge I intend to use for the project.

Seeing that I have no idea what they are talking about, any info would be greatly apprecriated

English Dave
07-02-2006, 06:38 PM
I am submitting a script to a new screenwriters program. They want to know what Shoot Gauge and Finish Gauge I intend to use for the project.

Seeing that I have no idea what they are talking about, any info would be greatly apprecriated

They clearly have less idea than you do.

Submit then call their bluff. :)

mrjonesprods
07-03-2006, 02:09 PM
It sounds as if you are filling out an application for funding to shoot your own script.

They are asking what format the film will be shot in - 35mm, 16mm, HD, dv cam, etc. The second part of the question has to do with finishing the film - will there be a 35mm print, will you finish on HD, or digi beta, etc?

Filmwonk
07-03-2006, 05:21 PM
It sounds as if you are filling out an application for funding to shoot your own script.

They are asking what format the film will be shot in - 35mm, 16mm, HD, dv cam, etc. The second part of the question has to do with finishing the film - will there be a 35mm print, will you finish on HD, or digi beta, etc?

This is indeed what they are asking, though what this has to do with screenwriting I don't know. Tell them you're shooting on a Fisher-Price Pixelvision 2000 and finishing on 70mm via a digital intermediate. That should fry their brains (or get them really excited).

jaffa
07-03-2006, 06:05 PM
Thanks guys, I'm submitting for funding through a Government Body so hence the questions. I might leave it blank as I have no idea about it. As a matter of interest what is the most expensive option to go for when selecting film type?

Bellabell
07-03-2006, 09:10 PM
For an indie film I would not go any higher than 35mm or it's suicide. You need to keep in mind that with 35 your talking a good $80,000-$85,000 for film stock, dailies and transfers. That's being conservative. By the way, I'm talking about a feature. If your doing a short, do what you want.

Good luck

odocoileus
07-03-2006, 11:01 PM
35mm shoot and finish is standard for Hwd studio films.

For US prime time TV shows, 35 mm shoot, transfer to digital video for edit and post is common. Some shows I've worked on use 16mm for origination, and get results just as good as 35mm (IMO).

The Bernie Mac Show, when I worked on it a few years ago, was using high definition video for shooting, editing, everything.

You should find out what the trends are in Oz. Here in the States, the medium of origination is a key subject for discussion/debate in the indy film mags and indy film community in general.

Some projects are well suited to the look of DV cam, others are best served by film. 35 mm is the ideal, but 16mm or super 16 can work fairly well, depending on the intended look of the film. Under the right conditions, a skilled DP can make 16mm look breathtakingly beautiful.

Each choice has its advantages and disadvantages. DV cam is probably the cheapest way to go for shooting and editing, but the cost of a transfer to 35 mm for exhibition may eat up all your savings.

The Other Steve
07-03-2006, 11:05 PM
They are asking what format the film will be shot in
This is indeed what they are asking, though what this has to do with screenwriting I don't know.
Agree. Appropriate for a "filmmaker", but not a "writer". That's ridiculous. Someone, somewhere doesn't have all their details right. But agencies (like AFC) can take those things seriously, and you should contact them to see how serious they are. That question is on your app for a reason.

Tell them you're shooting on a Fisher-Price Pixelvision 2000 and finishing on 70mm via a digital intermediate.
Process ENR. Tell them you want to revive 3-strip Technicolor.

odocoileus
07-03-2006, 11:11 PM
http://www.moviemaker.com/hop/vol3/07/cinema.html


a relatively recent discussion w/ an experienced DP who shot super 16 mm for the indy film Thirteen, and had done it earlier for a Spike Lee joint.

pconsidine
07-05-2006, 10:31 AM
Some projects are well suited to the look of DV cam, others are best served by film. Just wanted to make sure everyone caught this, as it's an absolutely critical part of modern filmmaking and deserves more attention than it gets - especially in indie circles.

Bellabell
07-05-2006, 11:32 AM
Just wanted to make sure everyone caught this, as it's an absolutely critical part of modern filmmaking and deserves more attention than it gets - especially in indie circles.

I agree. The movie "Pieces of April" is a perfect example. Although I personally didn't care for the story, the director uses DV very effectively.

Hairy Lime
07-06-2006, 08:39 AM
If/when you speak to someone at the film board, try to find out how important the film's budget is in the likelihood that you'll be selected. If budget is part of that equation, say you'll shoot on HD and transfer to 35mm. It'll save quite a bit of cash and look nearly as good, especially if the DP has some nice 35mm lenses to work with.