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View Full Version : "Cross-pollination of Hollywood screenwriters and comic book scribes" Nicholl winner!


Ben
07-27-2009, 03:53 PM
In the future -- will screenwriters do both?

Is this the direction you're going into?

Is this a trend or is this locked into the future?

http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=19693

hscope
07-27-2009, 04:13 PM
I think screenwriters (and writers in general) have to stay in touch with industry trends and look for opportunities anywhere and everywhere - or be left behind.

The comic book avenue interests me, as I'm actively looking for an illustrator to help turn one of my action adventure scripts into a graphic novel. (My drawing skills peaked prior to kindergarten)

I believe the story is well suited to this format and a published graphic novel version would give the script a much better chance of a sale.

Looks like fun, too.

thought_arcade
07-27-2009, 06:17 PM
Definitely the direction I'm going in.

The last three scripts are all meant to be Graphic Novels. It's a fun medium. And I'm writing a Graphic Novel that is just meant to be a GN, no film adaptation. It touches on a few things that no producer would ever dare touch, but in the GN world I can go apesh!t.

Bono
07-27-2009, 07:05 PM
I've been thinking about this too lately -- hard not to. I've never been a big comic book guy, but so many great movies have/are coming out because of them and as a writer, always interested in different mediums.

My question -- how does one "spec" a graphic novel. You write it, but then you must find an artist to bring the world to life (assuming you aren't one yourself).

I started to research is a bit at BN as they had those Writing Graphic Novel for Idiots Books, but right now it seems so foreign to me. Like when I first started reading screenwriting books. Until you start doing it -- a lot of it doesn't quite make sense. Then one day it all clicks.

thought_arcade
07-27-2009, 08:03 PM
I've been thinking about this too lately -- hard not to. I've never been a big comic book guy, but so many great movies have/are coming out because of them and as a writer, always interested in different mediums.

My question -- how does one "spec" a graphic novel. You write it, but then you must find an artist to bring the world to life (assuming you aren't one yourself).

I started to research is a bit at BN as they had those Writing Graphic Novel for Idiots Books, but right now it seems so foreign to me. Like when I first started reading screenwriting books. Until you start doing it -- a lot of it doesn't quite make sense. Then one day it all clicks.

Well, just like screenwriting, if you're not necessarily passionate about the medium it will come across, I think. I've always loved Graphic Novels - I go through phases where I read many, and then phases where I read none.

Recently I gave one of my screenplays to a friend who said "this would be a killer graphic novel" and demonstrated by drawing some of the characters. He blew me away - I had no idea that he was that good an artist, so we just decided that's what we're going to.

Foremost to me has always been sharing a story, and I've never been terribly concerned what medium that is. I of course prefer film, but we all know how hard it is to achieve that. The stuff I direct tends towards artier, smaller films. But I love to write massive, huge, mega-budget genre stuff. Ironically, I've had a lot more success with my artier side - now I'm going to get to indulge my geek side as well. And if some producer happens to be interested... well, the screenplay's already written! :)

I would say that trying to "spec" a graphic novel is just as difficult as "specing" a script. Perhaps less competition, but less of a market as well.

You definitely need to find an artist, and one definitely needs to understand the medium. There's not a lot of money to be made unless you're hooked up to the big boys, and accessing them is the same as the film world.

We're doing it all online, all ourselves - which suits me just fine. We'll sell merch (the novel will of course be free). The story gets told, and that's the most important thing for me.

Terrance Mulloy
07-27-2009, 08:29 PM
I read comics (limited titles) and I play video games (mainly FPS shooters), so it's all good to me. Screenplays, comics and I'd love to tackle the adaptation of a video game. Something like 'Dead Space' would be right up my alley.

I also have ideas for a novel too.

aaron_c
08-06-2009, 10:25 AM
I've been thinking about this too lately -- hard not to. I've never been a big comic book guy, but so many great movies have/are coming out because of them and as a writer, always interested in different mediums.

My question -- how does one "spec" a graphic novel. You write it, but then you must find an artist to bring the world to life (assuming you aren't one yourself).

I started to research is a bit at BN as they had those Writing Graphic Novel for Idiots Books, but right now it seems so foreign to me. Like when I first started reading screenwriting books. Until you start doing it -- a lot of it doesn't quite make sense. Then one day it all clicks.

You should seek out comic book forums and see if you can't find artists willing to do some samples with you. For instance, a few years ago I found a guy who wanted to illustrate a story with an image character (Deathblow, kinda like the Punisher) so I wrote a four page (comic pages) story. He never really finished it, but in theory it works :)

The actual script matters very little in terms of showing it off. I believe most people want to know whatever you write can be turned into a comic page and the best way to prove that is to bring on an artist.

And the other thing is that there really isn't a set standard for how a comic script is suppose to look. It's nothing like a screenplay. As long as the artist can take what you write and illustrate it, it doesn't really matter what the script looks like.

thought_arcade
08-06-2009, 10:44 AM
And the other thing is that there really isn't a set standard for how a comic script is suppose to look. It's nothing like a screenplay. As long as the artist can take what you write and illustrate it, it doesn't really matter what the script looks like.


There's a truth to that, but for submitting a script to a major publisher, the industry actually HAS adopted a kind of standard formatting for comic scripts. But that is only for when there is no art attached (let's say you had a great story but no artist and wanted to query based on the story alone). If you're just working on it on your own, then you can do whatever the hell you want of course, but on many occasions now I've seen a kind of proxy standard develop. It's almost like a literary storyboard. I'm going to see if I can't rustle it up and link one here.

ETA:

http://www.finaldraft.com/support/software/templates/

At the bottom there are Dark Horse templates and some others. I've seen these used a LOT nowadays.

aaron_c
08-06-2009, 10:54 AM
There's a truth to that, but for submitting a script to a major publisher, the industry actually HAS adopted a kind of standard formatting for comic scripts. But that is only for when there is no art attached (let's say you had a great story but no artist and wanted to query based on the story alone). If you're just working on it on your own, then you can do whatever the hell you want of course, but on many occasions now I've seen a kind of proxy standard develop. It's almost like a literary storyboard. I'm going to see if I can't rustle it up and link one here.

ETA:

http://www.finaldraft.com/support/software/templates/

At the bottom there are Dark Horse templates and some others. I've seen these used a LOT nowadays.

Cool, thanks. That's good to know. It's been a few years since I was trying my hand at writing for comics.

josephdluna
08-07-2009, 02:04 PM
I also have some big-budget stuff that would make a killer graphic novel. And it made it to the quarters of the Page contest.

I looked briefly into getting an artist interested. I found that artists (especially the good ones) are slightly higher up on the work-for-spec food chain than us lowly writers. Unless they're a friend, they want some money to do sample pages. And there is one guy offering to do a whole comic book of anybody's script, but he is quoting $3K to $5K.

Would love to hear the alternatives.

thought_arcade
08-07-2009, 02:14 PM
I also have some big-budget stuff that would make a killer graphic novel. And it made it to the quarters of the Page contest.

I looked briefly into getting an artist interested. I found that artists (especially the good ones) are slightly higher up on the work-for-spec food chain than us lowly writers. Unless they're a friend, they want some money to do sample pages. And there is one guy offering to do a whole comic book of anybody's script, but he is quoting $3K to $5K.

Would love to hear the alternatives.


Well, in my case the artist IS a friend. I got him excited about the idea and basically... even though it was my idea and my screenplay... I am granting him 50% ownership of the ideas, content, merchandise, everything.

Basically, we're in it together as a labour of love. And to be honest, to be working with a friend makes me truly happy. And even more, he's an IT professional who has NEVER drawn a comic book.... never taken an art class... and about 1 year ago I saw some of his so-called doodles... he's incredible. Kicks the ass of an awful lot that I've seen in pro-publications.

So you really only have three choices: Draw it yourself, pay someone, find a friend.