PDA

View Full Version : Driving Myself Crazy...


snwrist
09-04-2009, 07:48 PM
Here's the deal: a distant relative hooked me up with a producer, who runs his own company(with a co-owner). We met for lunch about a month and a half ago. I write horror...he produces horror and told me I had hit the jackpot. Over lunch, I pitched about four of my scripts to him. He liked the concepts...

...I sent him four of my scripts, at his request. He told me he'd only have time to read one, but would have his assistant read the other three. So I told him to read one in particular(which I've had other producers rave about)...the other three going to his assistant.

Haven't heard back from him yet. He sent me an e-mail two weeks ago, saying he'd be back in touch in a week. Still haven't heard from him, though. I know he's a busy guy and I'm not getting annoyed or anything. Just antsy--I haven't followed up with him yet, but I'm thinking about it.

The thing is--me and this producer really connected. We love the same types of films and he liked my concepts. He was talking about taking me into meetings and setting me up with a new manager or agent(because my current one, nice guy that he is, really hasn't done anything for me).

And here I am, driving myself crazy. Is it possible that it's taking him awhile because he LOVED one of my scripts and is trying to see what he can do with it? I really feel he and I are a great fit and atleast two of my scripts would be absolutely perfect for his company. Maybe his assistant loved my other scripts so it's taking him awhile because he has to read those? Or maybe he completely hates all of them(though I don't THINK this is the reason)? Regardless, I'm sure he'd still get back to me, as he's a good friend of my relative.

Any advice? Thoughts? Just clearing the air here. Sorry for the long schpiel...:)

maralyn
09-04-2009, 08:39 PM
Whatever you do, don't start badgering him with emails. Cos that's a really good way to make them think you're way to intense.

This could take a while, he's got four scripts to look at and who knows, he may be getting others to look at them as well. And no one is making snap decisions at the moment.

And how well have you executed them, a lot really does depend on that.

Chill out a bit, just keep going on your merry way.

snwrist
09-04-2009, 08:40 PM
Thanks-this is what I need to hear. I def. agree with you on not badgering him with e-mails. I'm not even one to follow-up...I'm sure he'll be in touch.

As for execution, I feel that two of them are very well executed. The other two are older(thus, not as strong), but still hold some merit IMO. He really, really loved the concept for one of these older scripts, though.

EvilRbt
09-04-2009, 09:22 PM
Hollywood moves soooooo slow. You have to be patient. On top of that, almost everyone in town vanishes during August. It's like a ghost town around here.

Waiting sucks, but that's 99% of a writer's career.

Ernie Santamaria
09-04-2009, 09:35 PM
"I haven't followed up with him yet, but I'm thinking about it."
--------------------------------------------------
Don't even think about following up yet.

Everything's going as timely and well as it should up to this point. He emailed you two weeks ago to touch base and that's considerate of him and a great early sign of how he does business with writers.

Remember even very minor producers, listed in a few directories, and in places online, average between 5 and 10 (or more) *script* submissions -- requested scripts, not just queries -- so his apparently lone assistant is up to his rear end in them -- probably has 10 or 15 backed up in his pile. He'll cover all 3 of them for the boss and you definitely will hear back from this producer.

It's always pins and needles time when you first strike a connection this solid.
Easy for me to say "Don't drive yourself crazy" but at least don't jump the gun and paint yourself as a "high maintenance amateur" unnecessarily.

And if he doesn't want to pursue your scripts I'm certain you'll get specific feedback from this friend of a friend (or relative) that will greatly help you.

The most likely outcome if he doesn't want to proceed immediately with a script of yours, is he'll ask for some changes in one of them that *did* appeal to him (the one whose concept he loved) and then something may very well come of that, depending on your rewrite's quality.

Chin up for now -- nothing else better serves your interests or changes the necessary flow of events at present. The events are strictly in his hands.

Ernie

Raff
09-05-2009, 10:44 AM
Yes, late August is dead in Hollywood.
Manager told me everyone is back to work on Tuesday, Sept.8
Waiting for some reactions myself but at least manager keeps me informed.

gravitas
09-05-2009, 01:20 PM
Go on to your next script. Put this guy out of your brain and always prepare to wait as EvilRbt said.

maralyn
09-05-2009, 04:43 PM
This is just a by the by, and others may have had different experiences, but giving someone four scripts to look at is a bit too much, I think, unless it's an agent or manager.

Investing too much into one contact.

I've done it, not four but three, and it felt like my stomach was hanging over the edge of one of those crocodile feeding boats. It was still in the early days before I'd optioned any scripts, which made me even more vulnerable I think. And then that all dragged on for a year. And ended in nothing.

After that I decided, no one ever gets more than one at a time. And they only get to see something else if we've talked first.

NikeeGoddess
09-07-2009, 07:52 AM
it may be as long as six or ten months before he gets back to you. by then you should have another first draft script in the works. and it will be a pleasant surprise when he finally hits you back.

also, check to see if he's attending any screenwriting events (like the expo in october) or film festivals. then see if you can go yourself. this way you can send a follow-up email saying that you hope to catch up with him there.

snwrist
09-07-2009, 08:24 AM
Funny you should say that, nikkee. I did, in fact, pitch him the current script I'm working on, which I've just finished the first draft on...bout to go back into the trenches and tear it apart, but it's a solid first draft. Still needs a little work and I definitely don't want to blow this contact.

grant
09-07-2009, 09:53 AM
This is just a by the by, and others may have had different experiences, but giving someone four scripts to look at is a bit too much, I think, unless it's an agent or manager.

Investing too much into one contact.

I've done it, not four but three, and it felt like my stomach was hanging over the edge of one of those crocodile feeding boats. It was still in the early days before I'd optioned any scripts, which made me even more vulnerable I think. And then that all dragged on for a year. And ended in nothing.

After that I decided, no one ever gets more than one at a time. And they only get to see something else if we've talked first.

What exactly are you investing? You can still send all four script to other people, right? Without knowing snwrist's exact situation, it seems a little weird that he sent four scripts, instead of sending four loglines and letting the exec pick one script to start with. But I don't see what sending four scripts costs you, if all parties are cool with it.

maralyn
09-07-2009, 02:47 PM
Anyway, I don't think there's a right or wrong way to go about things, but if you're unsold, and this person you've spoken to has never read any of your work, then, wait till they've read some, and see if they're still talking to you before you start deciding that they're talking to you, if you know what I mean.

Just from my memory of that situation it felt like "one" person was having too much sway over how I thought my career would pan out or something. And that put a lot of pressure on the situation. I just think it's good to protect yourself emotionally a bit, and only give one script out at a time. If they like your work, they'll talk to you whether they want to buy it or not. Even just to say they enjoyed the read, because they want to keep you in their loop.

And then you can say, hey, thanks for getting back to me, actually I've just finished another one, you wanna have a read of that?

And they ALWAYS say yes. Because now you're talking. And you've got them as a regular contact.

Anyway, done is done, and who knows, maybe this will all be fine. Maybe he'll find one or even two he wants.

I guess I'm suggesting to keep your knees together a bit, not just hand it all over. Because having it all on the line all at once like that can make you feel a bit out on a limb, and it puts a lot of pressure on the relationship, which is not a good thing to do. Like dating someone who brings up that they want to have children straight away. Twins would be better. Hey, why don't we just have triplets? Oh, pleeease, it would be so much FUN!

Too much.

But look, I bounced back and learned from all of that. And got a lot stronger in the process. Ultimately you have to work in which ever way suits you personally.

And maybe this person will have a completely different experience.

maralyn
09-07-2009, 03:36 PM
But the way I would try to salvage this now, is to email them in about two months, and say you're just following up, and you haven't really had all four scripts read alongside each other like that before, and you would be interested to know if he thinks any of the four are ready for sale.

And thanks for any feedback.

NikeeGoddess
09-07-2009, 05:00 PM
Funny you should say that, nikkee. I did, in fact, pitch him the current script I'm working on, which I've just finished the first draft on...bout to go back into the trenches and tear it apart, but it's a solid first draft. Still needs a little work and I definitely don't want to blow this contact.as long as he likes you and your writing then you should be fine. you might not have the perfect script that he's looking for but he'll keep reading what you have because you never know. the script you sent him a while back he might want two years from now. if he likes it he'll remember it.