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Alliebro
10-07-2009, 10:00 PM
Okay, in all honestly I am not now and probably will never be, A TV Writer.
It's just not my thing.

So, If you can forgive that for a while, and, too, this intrusion into the Writing For TV Forum, I hope someone may answer a question or two.

I'm writing an feature screenplay and as I do so, see the possibility of it also developing into a source for a comedy TV series. So much so that I even wrote some ideas for several scripts should the screenplay ever get produced and go that step further. How's that for a dreamer? (Sure, aren't we all?)

I am quite deficient in TV episodic comedy fare presently on the box and would like to know if a feature movie ever went on to spawn a TV comedy series. I think some MOW's have done so. Is it possible?

Usually it's a pilot script that gets developed into a series, it's my understanding, with a bunch of writers sitting around a table thinking up jokes for the episodes. Not my kind of thing, but, that's me.

artisone
10-08-2009, 10:17 AM
My Big Fat Greek Wedding was turned into a comedy series. And of course, the grandaddy of them all - M*A*S*H. I can't think of any contemporary examples.

Alliebro
10-08-2009, 10:28 AM
Thanks for that, artisone.

The Gunshark
10-10-2009, 05:30 PM
Thanks for that, artisone.

Stargate SG-1 was another one (albeit more of a science fiction action series) that got made from a movie. Look how well that did.

Alliebro
10-10-2009, 06:07 PM
Thanks, all. So, the chance is good a movie may spin off a TV series. Those script ideas I worked on might not be in vain after all. Now, back to writing the movie.

Midnite
10-11-2009, 09:08 AM
Does "The Odd Couple" ring any bells? Sticking with comedies...

"Alice" came from "Alice doesn't live here anymore", which was not a comedic film.

The Magnificent 7 had a brief run a coupla years ago, and then there's the Sarah Conner Chronicles, Buffy the Vampire slayer.....

Midnite

Wojciehowicz
10-11-2009, 02:34 PM
Read By Ken Levine (http://kenlevine.blogspot.com/) regularly. Just for the effect he has of making television comedy writing seem more approachable by making the people who've worked it seem more human and less legendary if that's all you need. For the accidental signposts to further resources with pop up all the time if you want to work the series adaptation yourself a bit.

Alliebro
10-12-2009, 09:25 AM
Read By Ken Levine (http://kenlevine.blogspot.com/) regularly. Just for the effect he has of making television comedy writing seem more approachable by making the people who've worked it seem more human and less legendary if that's all you need. For the accidental signposts to further resources with pop up all the time if you want to work the series adaptation yourself a bit.

Hey, Woj, thanks for your comments. The Ken Levine site looks quite interesting and I love his style. Will be haunting that place often. Thanks.

UltraSuperMegaMo
10-12-2009, 07:44 PM
Mr. and Mrs. Smith either was / is in development as a television series.

artisone
10-12-2009, 08:10 PM
Mr. and Mrs. Smith either was / is in development as a television series.

It was in development. A script was ordered and I think a pilot was shot. And i think it sucked.

jcgary
10-12-2009, 11:01 PM
Some advice: don't think about it. Don't work on story ideas for a TV show unless you really really want to be a TV writer. Don't expend energy in places where it likely won't pay off. Keep that energy for the big show, the feature.

If you realize midway through you're writing a TV show, consider it for awhile, meditate, and then if you decide you're right, ditch the feature and put all your energy into a TV show. Otherwise? Just stick to the feature. Put all your ideas for episodes into the feature. Worry about turning it into a TV show after you get a green light for the feature.

A caveat: if you're trying to sell the feature to a company that has a robust TV department (I'm thinking a family movie with kid cartoon spin-off potential), then develop the TV show to make that part of the feature pitch. "Hey, I'm handing you guys a franchise. See?" But otherwise, spend every last ounce of blood sweat and tears you have on the feature.