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Midnite
01-02-2010, 06:39 AM
Is finding a Distributor really that beneficial? Any advice would be sincerely appreciated.

An independent production company is in the editing process now on a very low budget script of mine. From the very beginning, they never considered trying to get it wide spread distribution...It has no sex, violence or obscenities...Just a lot of heart, based on the true story of how a very young girl's battle with leukemia inspired four strangers to do something special.

During the course of filming, they have received the commitment of the CW Network's Dayton Ohio Affiliate station manager to show the film during their regional broadcast hours.

The Enzian Theater in Orlando, Florida, which is very involved in the indie circuit, has offered to host(at no charge) a Friends and Family Premiere Weekend.

An international Website with tens of thousands of members whose families have dealt with childhood cancer has endorsed the film, and although they can't officially advertise it, we can post news releases on their main page and the word of mouth has already been spreading, which bodes well for DVD sales, which they will be doing directly from the film's website.

They also plan on showing it in a variety of independent local theaters...there are several "crowd scenes" filmed on location in a couple of different small towns, so they're counting on decent attendance for short runs in those towns.

The film's editor is assuring them that the movie "doesn't totally suck".

So the question is, would finding a distributor actually be financially beneficial? Would the contract get so convoluted that the profits would actually be less in the long run?

Just wondering...& Thanks.

Midnite

Rantanplan
01-02-2010, 07:41 AM
Is finding a Distributor really that beneficial? Any advice would be sincerely appreciated.

An independent production company is in the editing process now on a very low budget script of mine. From the very beginning, they never considered trying to get it wide spread distribution...It has no sex, violence or obscenities...Just a lot of heart, based on the true story of how a very young girl's battle with leukemia inspired four strangers to do something special.

During the course of filming, they have received the commitment of the CW Network's Dayton Ohio Affiliate station manager to show the film during their regional broadcast hours.

The Enzian Theater in Orlando, Florida, which is very involved in the indie circuit, has offered to host(at no charge) a Friends and Family Premiere Weekend.

An international Website with tens of thousands of members whose families have dealt with childhood cancer has endorsed the film, and although they can't officially advertise it, we can post news releases on their main page and the word of mouth has already been spreading, which bodes well for DVD sales, which they will be doing directly from the film's website.

They also plan on showing it in a variety of independent local theaters...there are several "crowd scenes" filmed on location in a couple of different small towns, so they're counting on decent attendance for short runs in those towns.

The film's editor is assuring them that the movie "doesn't totally suck".

So the question is, would finding a distributor actually be financially beneficial? Would the contract get so convoluted that the profits would actually be less in the long run?

Just wondering...& Thanks.

Midnite

The film's editor is assuring them that the movie "doesn't totally suck".

Well with that kind of endorsement, how could the producers not aim for wider distribution, LOL.

I'd say this film sounds like it's going to get some decent grass-roots exposure, so congrats on that. It's probably the best way to go. Your producers could just keep trying to book more venues and submitting the film to more television markets and of course promote the DVDs agressively. Maybe submit to some festivals if the local release doesn't disqualify the film?

Midnite
01-02-2010, 08:07 AM
The film's editor is assuring them that the movie "doesn't totally suck".

Well with that kind of endorsement, how could the producers not aim for wider distribution, LOL.

I'd say this film sounds like it's going to get some decent grass-roots exposure, so congrats on that. It's probably the best way to go...

Thanks R...Yeah, I'm not sure how well "doesn't totally suck" will work as a marketing campaign.....But you know how folks can get all excited and try to turn something simple into something bigger than it's meant to be...And then they get caught up in a contract that ends up screwing 'em over.

The voice of sanity keeps whispering grass roots & keeping it simple, and I appreciate you chiming in.

Midnite

carcar
01-02-2010, 10:36 AM
Have you discussed the film's future with the producers? Are you asking about distribution because they've turned it down? Or because the issue hasn't come up yet? And is the issue that wider distribution will result in more money for you, or more exposure?

It sounds like they're building platforms to a larger audience, but if you get the sense that it's totally random, you may want to find out what their plan is. And as the screenwriter (you sold it to them?), you may not get a decisive voice in this. But it sounds like they're moving ahead with some direction, and they may be angling for a bigger distributor down the road.

You may want to try asking these questions on a more indie-film production-oriented board, with people who've gone through this cycle, to get a wider range of opinions, although there's a good thread going right now about making a low-budget feature.

But in the meantime, I'd say make the most of what's already in place. If it's being shown on television in a local area, try and get some face time with that station, an interview about how you put the story together. And you're going to attend that screening, right? I don't have any experience with the Enzian myself, but I have a cousin who was very involved with it and my understanding is that it's the heart of a very passionate film community, and they're pretty good about getting visibility for their films. Be a presence, make yourself as much a part of the face of the filmmaking team as you can.

maralyn
01-02-2010, 02:41 PM
indietalk.com might have some info,

Midnite
01-03-2010, 05:08 AM
indietalk.com might have some info,

Thanks Maralyn & CarX2...I'll be checking out those other Sites.

The film was produced by a local guy I was involved with for a year on several 48 hour Film Projects...When he felt ready to do a feature, and had lined up a small amount of investors' money, he asked if I had anything low budget.

I felt that the script wasn't commercial enough, and besides, he was looking for a cop kind of story, so told him no, all I had was a little tear jerker.

But he got a hold of the script, fell in love and it became his passion project...Most of my money comes off the back end, so the future distribution, etc. will affect me, and yes, because it's a local indie, I still have a fair amount of input.

At this point, it's more about the exposure of the film, and the story behind it, than it is about the $$$...

So, again, Thanks for the input.

Midnite

carcar
01-03-2010, 08:30 AM
Good luck with it, Midnite. It sounds good.

maralyn
01-03-2010, 09:06 AM
I would get a distributor on board tho. And get it on tv. Depending on its production values.

Don't be afraid of contracts.

SoCalScribe
01-03-2010, 01:16 PM
Is finding a Distributor really that beneficial? Any advice would be sincerely appreciated.

...

So the question is, would finding a distributor actually be financially beneficial? Would the contract get so convoluted that the profits would actually be less in the long run?

It's really hard to answer a question like this, because distribution agreements are complex contracts that involve a lot of negotiation and, often, compromise. Would finding a distributor be financially beneficial? It depends on the terms of the distribution agreement, on both sides... what you get out of it, and what the distributor is offering for it. If you have a terrible distribution agreement, you could end up with less in the long run, but a good distribution agreement could yield a significant additional profit.

Ultimately, I wouldn't accept or reject any avenue of potential revenue outright. Explore your options and find out of wider distribution through a third-party distributor can help you reach your goals. Then it's all about the negotiation and, at the end of the day, you either have an agreement you're willing to sign, or you don't.