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cmmora
01-24-2010, 09:21 PM
out of you. As a primer...

I've been pursing a screenwriting career for more years than I like to remember. When I first starting writing, I talked myself out of writing for T.V. since it's almost impossible to break in as a staff writer. So, I dedicated myself to learning the feature script world. Learning the craft. Now after 5 feature scripts, numerous shorts and 4 short scripts I have written and directed, I think I'm hitting my stride. Hopefully, one day I will get repped. It's been a long road, but I have enjoyed it. I love to think up stories from the either.

Now this Sunday I'm sitting here watching the Game (Go Saints) and a commercial comes on for a new series. The plot and even a scene inthe pilot episode looks very smiliar to a feature script I wrote many years ago. My heart dropped. The first thought I has was if I send out my script to anyone they will think I ripped it off from this series. Frustrating to see an idea I've been thinking about for years done by someone else, and not that I am God's gift to writing, so I am sure they did a better job at the premise than I did.

But still, I am looking in from the outside and it's annoying seeing someone else get the golden ring.

I even thought about contacting the show runner and try to get my script to him to see if he has any freelance assignments for the show. I would do a kick butt job with this premise. But, with so many experienced T.V. writers out of work, I'm sure this is a long shot. Which is why I've been doing the feature script route in the first place.

Oh, well. As I always say... Just keep writing. At least I enjoy the process. Even though the process hates me.

NikeeGoddess
01-24-2010, 10:30 PM
there's really only one thing successful screenwriter's have in common - PERSISTENCE! if you give up then no one will come knocking on your door.

btw - maybe one reason so many tv writers are out of work is b/c they're old school and have nothing new to offer. if you can kick their ass with mad skills then so be it. it's just business.

Bono
01-24-2010, 10:49 PM
All writers MUST learn this eventually -- no matter what the idea is, 99% of the time someone just sold the same thing or is working on it or a big star will sell it as a pitch the day after you finish it. Or you write it and three years later, the same premise sells.

The script we just went out with, well we thought of the idea in 2003, wrote it and then a movie/tv show with the exact same premise came out within a few months of us completing it -- so we shelved it thinking it was dead. It was the same script that got us repped in 2009, that a producer/agent are working on setting up as a movie today. Long time... yes.

Ideas are always out there. It's more than that, it's the execution/your voice/ and luck.

We could all take the same idea "boy falls in love with girl" and make a billion stories. And no matter how specific we get "blind boy falls in love with seven foot girl during WWII in 1945 in Texas" all writers will make it their own.

It's a waste of time to worry about such things and you have to expect it.

beerbeastredux
01-25-2010, 02:09 AM
I hate to say it but come out to LA ( which goes against every bit of advice i WANT to give ) and get to know someone..ANYONE in the biz. slowly get to know people. You will ONLY get your stuff read if you know someone.

Sad..but true. It really is all about "who you know"

umo
01-25-2010, 09:09 AM
I hate to say it but come out to LA ( which goes against every bit of advice i WANT to give ) and get to know someone..ANYONE in the biz. slowly get to know people. You will ONLY get your stuff read if you know someone.

Sad..but true. It really is all about "who you know"

Yes, so true.

kidcharlemagne
01-25-2010, 09:54 AM
[there's really only one thing successful screenwriter's have in common - PERSISTENCE! if you give up then no one will come knocking on your door.


I'm just reading Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell and he says the common denominator with many sucessful people is that they have practiced their craft for 10,000 hours whether it be Mozart, Bill Gates, classical violinists, sports men/women or fiction writers. He also says that e.g. with violinists at a certain point the talent is no longer the differentiator and the trigger to success is the amount of hours practiced, the more succesful violinists simply practice more. He even talks about the Beatles and how they honed their craft in clubs in Hamburg playing for hundreds of hours, playing live sets far more often than other bands back home so that when they returned to England they were a much tighter outfit.

10,000 hours. Mmmh....

I make that roughly 2 hours and 45 min per day over 10 years.
Or with 4 hours a day it will take you 6.85 years.

cmmora
01-25-2010, 10:39 AM
I guess even a Mod messes up and puts a thread in the wrong area. My question was more about the business (thus this section) than about TV as I had it before. Thanks for catching this fact my Peeps.

I hear you Beer. L.A. would be ideal to go to and network and all. But at the moment, it is not possible to go and live there. Funny... born and raised in L.A. County and now it may take me a lifetime to get back.

But I do visit the folks often. I guess I will have to do a better job of power networking the times I am there.

Bono... so true. Thanks for reminding me.

Thanks for your thoughts everyone.

Geoff Alexander
01-25-2010, 10:45 AM
out of you. As a primer...

I've been pursing a screenwriting career for more years than I like to remember. When I first starting writing, I talked myself out of writing for T.V. since it's almost impossible to break in as a staff writer. So, I dedicated myself to learning the feature script world. Learning the craft. Now after 5 feature scripts, numerous shorts and 4 short scripts I have written and directed, I think I'm hitting my stride. Hopefully, one day I will get repped. It's been a long road, but I have enjoyed it. I love to think up stories from the either.

Now this Sunday I'm sitting here watching the Game (Go Saints) and a commercial comes on for a new series. The plot and even a scene inthe pilot episode looks very smiliar to a feature script I wrote many years ago. My heart dropped. The first thought I has was if I send out my script to anyone they will think I ripped it off from this series. Frustrating to see an idea I've been thinking about for years done by someone else, and not that I am God's gift to writing, so I am sure they did a better job at the premise than I did.

But still, I am looking in from the outside and it's annoying seeing someone else get the golden ring.

I even thought about contacting the show runner and try to get my script to him to see if he has any freelance assignments for the show. I would do a kick butt job with this premise. But, with so many experienced T.V. writers out of work, I'm sure this is a long shot. Which is why I've been doing the feature script route in the first place.

Oh, well. As I always say... Just keep writing. At least I enjoy the process. Even though the process hates me.

Wait a minute, this is a great opportunity for you to try and get your material into the hands of folks that may be predisposed to reading it and could have the ability to hire you on something.

What are you waiting for? Get that script to someone involved with the show.

cmmora
01-25-2010, 10:58 AM
Wait a minute, this is a great opportunity for you to try and get your material into the hands of folks that may be predisposed to reading it and could have the ability to hire you on something.

What are you waiting for? Get that script to someone involved with the show.

I'm researching this as I type this note...:D

SoCalScribe
01-25-2010, 12:37 PM
I'm just reading Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell and he says the common denominator with many sucessful people is that they have practiced their craft for 10,000 hours whether it be Mozart, Bill Gates, classical violinists, sports men/women or fiction writers. He also says that e.g. with violinists at a certain point the talent is no longer the differentiator and the trigger to success is the amount of hours practiced, the more succesful violinists simply practice more. He even talks about the Beatles and how they honed their craft in clubs in Hamburg playing for hundreds of hours, playing live sets far more often than other bands back home so that when they returned to England they were a much tighter outfit.

10,000 hours. Mmmh....

I make that roughly 2 hours and 45 min per day over 10 years.
Or with 4 hours a day it will take you 6.85 years.


There's also the belief among many that you have to write a million words before you get good enough to write professionally. Granted that came from the world of novelists where you're talking 50,000 to 100,000 word manuscripts... but even in comparing the ratio, you're talking 10-20 complete works before you're good enough to write that type of work professionally.

Either way, whether it's hours or words... I've still got a ways to go. :D

Shot Across the Bow
01-25-2010, 01:57 PM
Is it "Past Life?"

cmmora
01-25-2010, 02:36 PM
yes.

beerbeastredux
01-25-2010, 03:31 PM
Keep writing.

To quote Rocky IV ( 3? ) "You gotta punch, and punch, and punch, and punch! Til you can't punch no more!!"

jtwg50
01-25-2010, 03:32 PM
Dear BeerBeastRedux:
No offense, but you could not be more wrong. I wrote my first script in 2007. I lived in Georgia (now Florida). I got read at CAA, William Morris, ICM and UTA after cold querying by phone. I also got read by two A-list managers and Academy Award winning producer. The script ended up getting optioned for $20,000 against a $100,000 purchase price. I got paid quickly. The option has not been exercised, but I couldn't care less (I'm a realist in that sense).
Now, I'm ready to go out with a follow-up script. And once again, I have had no trouble getting read.
The fact that you make the claim you do is just an excuse, which is the same thing many newbies do on here.
Yes, it's a very tough business, but every month, every season, every year, somebody new breaks in somehow -- sale, option, major rep, you name it. All you need is a great script. You don't need to know anybody to get a foot in the door.

joe9alt
01-25-2010, 04:59 PM
You will ONLY get your stuff read if you know someone.

Sad..but true. It really is all about "who you know"

What a defeatist, borderline moronic attitude.

People that can't craft a logline...can't craft a query email...can't project well in person...and can't write all that well often adopt this attitude.

All you need to KNOW to get read in this business is somebody's email address. :rolleyes:

spacefarer
01-25-2010, 05:09 PM
I hate to say it but come out to LA ( which goes against every bit of advice i WANT to give ) and get to know someone..ANYONE in the biz. slowly get to know people. You will ONLY get your stuff read if you know someone.

Sad..but true. It really is all about "who you know"

Dude, I don't know anyone in the US side of the business and I've been read many times over. Most of the times I got a NO but I also got one YES. And I don't even live on that side of the Atlantic.

Laura Reyna
01-25-2010, 06:03 PM
Have to agree with the people who say you don't "need to know someone in the business"...

Writers right here on DD have gotten managers off of a cold query or a contest.

It does help to get a personal recommendation, but what ultimately makes people want to work with a new writer is the material.

If you have good, commercial ideas, know how to write an entertaining script, & are persistent, you will eventually find success.

:)

Ulysses
01-25-2010, 08:35 PM
I hate to say it but come out to LA ( which goes against every bit of advice i WANT to give ) and get to know someone..ANYONE in the biz. slowly get to know people. You will ONLY get your stuff read if you know someone.

Sad..but true. It really is all about "who you know"

This doesn't make any sense. Who keeps you from getting to know people?

You have a script. You don't know anybody. You research who might be good for it (either producing it, or representing you).

Then you contact these people and get them to meet you. How good a logline writer are you? Can you make people curious about your work?

Then you are going to meet them.

Now it depends on who you are. Can you grab their attention and fire up their imagination with your work and your personal qualities, your charm and your entertaining character features?

It's not about who you know, but who you are.

hscope
01-25-2010, 08:54 PM
I'm convinced I will not sell a script until someone buys one from me.

No doubt someone here will point out the error of my theory.

Butch Jarvinen
01-25-2010, 11:08 PM
I set my expectations HIGH; I expect my first script to be read, optioned and produced in a very short period of time.

However, it's not like I got outta bed last month, wrote an outline for an idea, made it into a movie script, and making all the mistakes, that I've read about on here over the past two years.

The thought process, the writing, the research, the rewriting, asking questions, more rewriting, reading, more research, more questions; ten years later - 50% complete.

Optomistic that I will finish this year, with a very marketable script. Much of the quality of the final product I can credit to the guidance and advice that I have received from professional here on DDP.

I do not buy "in order to be successful, you have to have written a million words, or ten scripts". Unless, you can count rewriting the same words five time.
Echo

mtoomey
01-25-2010, 11:27 PM
yeah, have to agree...getting read isn't the hard part. getting them to like your sh!t is the hard part. Or rather, writing really good sh!t that they'll like is the hard part. :-)

MT

Hasil Adkins
01-25-2010, 11:29 PM
I see a lot of people here placing great emphasis on "getting read".

As if that were some great accomplishment.

Of course you can 'get read' from cold queries. Of course you can 'get read' without any networking, or friends in the business, or living in LA.

How's 'getting read' working out for you?

It's not defeatist or moronic to suggest that personal connections, networking, or recommendations count for a lot. Especially if you're talking about starting and sustaining a career, and not 'getting read' or getting one option that never goes anywhere and bowing out.

And: this?

I do not buy "in order to be successful, you have to have written a million words, or ten scripts".

OK. You don't buy it. What are you basing that on?

I feel like I'm branding myself into a nay-saying crank but some of the things I read here just amaze me.

And, finally, to prove I'm not a nay-saying crank, to the OP, when you start to feel down, remember the words of the late great Joe Strummer:

Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence. Talent will not. There is nothing more common then unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not. Unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not. The world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and Determination alone are Omnipotent.

cmmora
01-25-2010, 11:52 PM
And, finally, to prove I'm not a nay-saying crank, to the OP, when you start to feel down, remember the words of the late great Joe Strummer:

Thanks Hasil. Words to ponder, indeed.

WritersBlock2010
01-25-2010, 11:52 PM
I set my expectations HIGH; I expect my first script to be read, optioned and produced in a very short period of time.

Not to be an a$$hole, but very rarely does it work this way. At least, in my experience.

Like John Lennon said, Life is what happens when you make plans :)

I hope you are the exception to the rule, Butch, but be prepared for the long wait most of us have endured.

You can be optimistic, but don't get your hopes up to the point of naivete, or unrealistic expectations.


I do not buy "in order to be successful, you have to have written a million words, or ten scripts". Unless, you can count rewriting the same words five time.

Even so called prodigies in their chosen fields had to go through a learning process. This means, the very first things they wrote, played, painted, sculpted were not masterpieces. It takes time to hone one's in-grained talent, irregardless of who they were e.g. Michelangelo; Renoir, etc.

Like Haskil said, getting read is easy. Even in this shrinking economy of specs. I personally know a number of writers on this site who are not in L.A., who are being read by moves and shakers. Myself included.

It's getting those movers and shakers to say, "Yes"... Yes, I want to option this. Yes, I want to buy this. Yes, I want to produce this... This is the brass ring we should all be reaching for with optimistic, but tempered expectations.

Butch Jarvinen
01-26-2010, 12:35 AM
mostly said tongue in cheek - naw, i'm not that niave. I have the rest of my life. fortunately, my disability keeps me alive and a roof over my head.

once the writing is finished, the work begins
;)

Ulysses
01-26-2010, 02:22 AM
It's not defeatist or moronic to suggest that personal connections, networking, or recommendations count for a lot. Especially if you're talking about starting and sustaining a career, and not 'getting read' or getting one option that never goes anywhere and bowing out.



Looks to me as any decent career has some strong and important personal connection somewhere.

Like Hemingway's one armed character finds out at the end of his tether: you can't do it alone. (I mean the book, not the sweetish Howard Hawks movie that has nothing to do with the book)

jtwg50
01-26-2010, 08:40 AM
BeerBeast -- another thought:
If you have a good logline and a good attitude, you can get help here at DD, too. I just got a referral to a top manager (former A-list agent) by contacing someone here, who then referred me once he saw my logline.
So dude, it is WAY easiser to get to know someone or get read.
I hope the others who posted here convinced you just how clueless you are.
Write a great script, get on the horn, and something will happen. No doubt about it. The hard part is writing the great script.

beerbeastredux
01-26-2010, 01:24 PM
It's not defeatist or moronic to suggest that personal connections, networking, or recommendations count for a lot.

Yes, that was my point. It was not to suggest there aren't other paths to success. I am speaking from my own personal experience of working in Hollywood for the last 15 years.

I've worked for Sony, Dreamworks, Cartoon Network, Ted Turner, Nickelodeon, and Fox ( where I'm currently employed ) The job market is BRUTAL. Even with my talent, degree, and resume it took 3 years from my LAST job, to get this one. And the only reason I got in was because I asked a friend who worked here to get me a storyboard test. Even more talented, experienced animators than myself are struggling. The competition is insane.

Now, I also write. I already had an IN at the studios I pitched to, I had a pitbull of an agent pitching my stuff around town. And in 15 years of pitching, I've only ever had ONE property optioned ( a tv show pilot which was never aired )

So that's really all I meant. And as you can see, even when you're "IN" and you "know people" it's still a constant battle. And by no means am I suggesting anyone give up on their dreams.

Ulysses
01-26-2010, 02:23 PM
Yes, that was my point. It was not to suggest there aren't other paths to success. I am speaking from my own personal experience of working in Hollywood for the last 15 years.

I've worked for Sony, Dreamworks, Cartoon Network, Ted Turner, Nickelodeon, and Fox ( where I'm currently employed ) The job market is BRUTAL. Even with my talent, degree, and resume it took 3 years from my LAST job, to get this one. And the only reason I got in was because I asked a friend who worked here to get me a storyboard test. Even more talented, experienced animators than myself are struggling. The competition is insane.

Now, I also write. I already had an IN at the studios I pitched to, I had a pitbull of an agent pitching my stuff around town. And in 15 years of pitching, I've only ever had ONE property optioned ( a tv show pilot which was never aired )

So that's really all I meant. And as you can see, even when you're "IN" and you "know people" it's still a constant battle. And by no means am I suggesting anyone give up on their dreams.

Congratulations on your job.

You original post must have been written in a dark hour. This is why is sounded defeatist to many.

joe9alt
01-26-2010, 03:02 PM
I see a lot of people here placing great emphasis on "getting read".

As if that were some great accomplishment. :

Don't devalue it, though. Reads are a totally necessary thing. You have to be able to get reads and if somebody wants to get happy or feel good about getting a read let 'em, man. Gratifying moments are few and far between in this business and if you have to use those positive moments to propel you forward and build you confidence THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH THAT.

I still remember that great feeling I had when somebody would ask to read my script after querying them. I still remember the excitement of checking my email the next morning after a night of sending out fifty or a hundred e-queries. I’m at a different stage in my career now but those positive moments got me through those cold nights when it was just me starin’ at the mountain, ya know?

Don’t devalue reads…but don’t quit your day job, either, if you’re getting them. Just enjoy the process, hope for the best, and see where it goes.



Of course you can 'get read' from cold queries. Of course you can 'get read' without any networking, or friends in the business, or living in LA.


How's 'getting read' working out for you?

It's working out alright, man. I’m on my third manager and I’m repped at a three letter agency. My first two managers I emailed cold. My agent I emailed cold. So those reads worked out real well for me.

I’m a big advocate of moving to LA if at all possible. In my case, it’s not possible right now so I’ve had to do it all outside the walls so to speak. I’m doing it, though. It’s only a matter of time. It definitely can be done. Many of us are proving that. If you can afford to move to LA and work for $8 an hour (or work free) as a prod co or studio intern then go for it. You’ll make tons of contacts and you’ll learn a ton of valuable lessons that will help you as you climb this ladder. If you CAN’T afford to do that or can’t do it for whatever reason, don’t use the fact that you don’t live in LA as the excuse for why you’re not succeeding. Work harder. Write better. Do whatever you need to do but don’t use that as an excuse because it’s a BS excuse, ya know? You can do this from ANYWHERE. That's the beauty of it. Now I want to direct down the line so there may come a time when moving my family to LA is what I need to do but at this stage I don't NEED to be there. I need to go down there a few times a year for a week or so at a time to take meetings. I need to keep cranking out specs. I need to doggedly pursue the assignments my reps put me up for. I need to keep nurturing my contacts...but I don't NEED to live in LA. Not yet. Maybe not ever? I don't know. Time will tell.



It's not defeatist or moronic to suggest that personal connections, networking, or recommendations count for a lot. Especially if you're talking about starting and sustaining a career, and not 'getting read' or getting one option that never goes anywhere and bowing out.

I agree with this statement, Hasil, but that’s NOT what was initially said, though (and I appreciate you backtracking, beer)…what was initially said was:

You will ONLY get your stuff read if you know someone.

And that, my friend, IS moronic and defeatist because in so many cases (mine included) it’s simply not true. It's just not.

In Spring 2005, I started writing my first script and knew nobody in the industry…not a soul…I’d send them emails pitching my script and some would ask to read the script and some wouldn't. That first script (which according to many posters here would have to be total piece of crap because it was my first script) went on to win a contest...not a major contest...but my script won this little contest and the guy who is currently my agent was on the Advisory Board for that contest and that fact would help me big time later on when I emailed him cold asking him to read my stuff. That would have never happened had I thrown that script in the trash heap because a lot of people on here say first scripts suck. Mine didn't. Yours might not, either.

Slowly but surely..starting with that very first script...I started building a network of fans...people who liked that first spec and told me they were open to reading whatever I wrote the next. The next time around it was a little easier getting reads.

I’m a big advocate of writers going after representation. A writer needs quality representation, especially when approaching this from out of town. Target managers and agents. It’s gonna be hard. It’s very competitive. These guys and gals have a ton of writers and scripts to choose from so they’re typically very selective but somewhere out there is the one that will get your voice and see the potential in you. That’s corny but true.

If you work hard enough and write well enough your script is the thing that will introduce you to people. Your script is the thing that will make people want to know who you are. Think of it like wearing a name tag at a conference or whatever. Make sure your name tag says, “Hi, my name is Joe and I’m a BAD ASS.”

Now go be bad asses, people. :cool:

WritersBlock2010
01-26-2010, 04:00 PM
That would have never happened had I thrown that script in the trash heap because a lot of people on here say first scripts suck. Mine didn't. Yours might not, either.

I agree with this philosophy, actually.

I am reluctant to tell people this because they think I am lying, or bragging (or both), but the second script I ever wrote scored me my first agent many years ago.

However, one can also argue it was the right script, for the right person (agent) at the right time. It probably was.

But I echo what Joe is saying about being fearless and believing in yourself when you are starting out.

At the same time, I also think my previous statement about scoring an agent, option or something of this magnitude with the very first script someone ever writes is few and far between, too. It's not a contradiction, but a generalization (the good kind) that applies to a lot of those who aren't lucky enough to have the stars align, and/or who still need to perfect their craft when all is said, and done.

Alyssa Runswithwolves
01-28-2010, 04:22 AM
Out learn them and out live them.

DaltWisney
01-28-2010, 04:52 AM
This sort of thing happens all the time. I've had a couple ideas that, on the surface, closely resembled projects that were later set up. It's frustrating, but I take it as a compliment. Isn't it a good sign that you're coming up with ideas that are commercial enough to become sales/pilots/features/etc?

That's what you want. You just want to be the guy getting paid for it.

Making money from creative writing isn't an easy venture. Most people won't earn a dime. Even most of the writers who read sites like DD and put legitimate effort into learning their craft will never become working professionals. I've been at this for a few years now and I've learned at least one important lesson:

Don't write unless you enjoy it - Pretty simple. If you don't enjoy writing, don't do it. It's a tough career. You'll have a much easier time making money doing something else. If you enjoy writing, you'll have a good time with the pursuit regardless of whether or not your career takes off.

I've had my fair share of peaks and valleys over the past few years in this game. I've had brief flirtations with success and extended romances with failure. I've gone through long stretches where I've been completely unproductive. I've struggled to finish uninspired crap that I started writing mainly because I thought it would be commercial. I eventually remembered why I started doing this in the first place: because it's fun.

Now I'm writing stuff that I enjoy. If it takes off, great. If not, oh well. It's an interesting challenge and I'm having fun with it. If I wasn't getting anything out of the writing process itself, I wouldn't write.

DaltWisney
01-28-2010, 05:06 AM
One other little addendum:

A writer is a factory. Written works are the products he manufactures.

In order to make money, you have to have something to sell. This means you should always be working on things. You might get pipped once or twice by parallel development, but if you're constantly cranking out professional caliber stories then I have to think that you'll eventually make a breakthrough.

I think some writers make the mistake of putting all their chips in one basket. Spending two years on one script can work, but I don't think that's the best use of a writer's time. I ascribe to the Scott Rosenberg philosophy: write it, try to sell it, and move on. This process shouldn't take more than a few months.

If you get beat to the punch, oh well. There's a pretty good chance that your "take" on the concept is unique even if the concept itself isn't. If your story is too similar to be sellable after someone beats you to the punch with something similar, it can still function as a writing sample and you're not totally sunk because you didn't spend years on it.

Anagram
04-05-2012, 02:21 PM
Thanks guys, I know it's an old thread but some really inspirational stuff. :)

I ascribe to the Scott Rosenberg philosophy: write it, try to sell it, and move on. This process shouldn't take more than a few months.

I love this quote. It's a really encouraging message - you've finished your script and now it's time to put it down and get excited about all the other ideas lurking in your mind. It makes me happy to move on.

mikejc
04-05-2012, 03:31 PM
yes, this is an old thread, but interesting and one that will still apply 50 years from now.

But, here is another point. It does not matter WHAT business you are in, being an independent operator/worker/business person is VERY tough.

Having an ongoing operation earning you the income a consistently working screenwriter can make is IMPOSSIBLE on every rational level--which is why most people don't attempt it or quit.

Screenwriting is not unique in that respect.

Take an example; you want to break into the grocery business? You are competing for shelf space with Coke and Proctor and Gamble and Kraft. You think you are going to just waltz in and get a chance? And, if you do get a chance, they keep track of sales per inch of shelf frontage, and if your stuff doesn't measure up, you're gone.

I'm not in the grocery business, but that's a real example.

No matter what you do, unless you want to punch the clock and get hourly wages, you have to work your ass off if the result amounts to anything significant.

And, you have to keep at it.

One old trite saying goes something like this: losers stop at the first "no" they get. Winners stop at the first "yes."

holly
04-05-2012, 06:46 PM
I would love an analysis of regularly working screenwriters - how many scripts did they write before getting in, and how many years did they work at it prior?
For most working screenwriters I know personally (small sample) it was one of their first few scripts in the first couple years of writing.

Which isn't scientific, and it isn't to dissuade anyone who takes a longer road.