PDA

View Full Version : People with class


Rantanplan
02-25-2011, 08:09 PM
I know as aspiring scribes we're supposed to accept our lowly status and just be grateful if anybody ever responds to us or otherwise acknowledges our existence, but reps or producers or CE's who take the time to pen even a one-line pass on a script they read, or respond to a follow-up inquiry, well those are just classy people in my book.

I completely realize that the electronic age has made everybody busier and rushed and forced to work at light speed (remember the days where you got a letter, responded to the letter, mailed the letter, and then waited 2-5 days for a response? Lordy.), but when basic civility is practiced, in any professional field, well I for one take note and appreciate it.

Anyway. This was prompted by an e-mail I just received at 7 pm my time on a Friday night by the CE at a big production company, apologizing for taking so long to read my script (sent mid-December), passing on it in a very nice way and asking me to keep in touch. *Classy.*

Yeah I know I sound corny, but I think the world would be a better place with just a tiny bit more respect going around between human beings.

Craig Mazin
02-25-2011, 08:54 PM
That goes both ways. Excellent advice.

C.

Rantanplan
02-25-2011, 08:56 PM
That goes both ways. Excellent advice.

C.

Absolutely. Which is why I thanked this person and told her it was very classy of her and sincerely appreciated and wished her an awesome weekend.

Now she gets to start her weekend being called classy and I get to start mine feeling more like a human being and less like a doormat :)

DavidK
02-25-2011, 11:54 PM
You can imagine how shocked and disappointed I was to notice a thread with this title and then discover it wasn't about me. By all accounts I didn't even make the short list. And so it's with a considerable sense of despondency and that I now take a bottle of wine and retire to my hammock to console myself. I had class once, you know. I really had it.

sarajb
02-26-2011, 05:23 PM
Todd Karate has class.

Derek Haas
02-26-2011, 06:21 PM
I am reminded of the last year Nolan Ryan was pitching for the Rangers (did you figure out I am a baseball fan?)

Ryan agreed to sign autographs for an hour after each spring training game. One hour only.

Lines would form around the field, stretching as far as the eye could see.

Ryan would have a nice word to say to each fan as he signed their cards or baseballs.

After an hour, his handler would come out and say "sorry, but Mr. Ryan has to get to the gym now. Our apologies... he'll be out tomorrow."

I was watching the spectacle out of curiosity. I heard a dad who was fourth in line when the line shut down. He grabbed his kid's hand and headed away in a huff. As they pass me, the kid says, "He won't sign anymore?"

And the dad says, "What a jerk!"



I'm no Nolan Ryan... Craig is of course, but I'm not. I just ask you guys to realize that we get requests to read pages all the time, to meet for coffee, to have lunch, to get some personal tips, to speak at conferences, to judge contests, etc. Amplify that by the fact that I edit a short story website in my "spare" time. EVERYONE has written a short story... even people who haven't finished scripts.

Anyway... I wish I (or we) could say yes to everyone. But we can't. I do try to answer all emails, but sometimes those answers are, "I can't right now." I hope you guys don't walk off in huffs and say "what a jerk."

nic.h
02-26-2011, 06:28 PM
Anyway... I wish I (or we) could say yes to everyone. But we can't. I do try to answer all emails, but sometimes those answers are, "I can't right now." I hope you guys don't walk off in huffs and say "what a jerk."

Like I said on the thank you thread - you guys (pros generally) have a million things going on way more important than worrying about us. Not to point too fine a point on it, but frankly, everything you contribute here is a bonus. And should be viewed that way.

But some people are idiots and have an inherent sense of entitlement. That's OK - that happens. Normal people know who the real jerks are in this scenario.

And just for reference - Craig asked me about my situation. I didn't seek him out. If I had, I doubt anything like what happened would have. (I know this isn't what you mean, Derek, but just in case it's prompting an inundation of unsolicited PMs.)

gravitas
02-26-2011, 06:40 PM
I am reminded of the last year Nolan Ryan was pitching for the Rangers (did you figure out I am a baseball fan?)

Ryan agreed to sign autographs for an hour after each spring training game. One hour only.

Lines would form around the field, stretching as far as the eye could see.

Ryan would have a nice word to say to each fan as he signed their cards or baseballs.

After an hour, his handler would come out and say "sorry, but Mr. Ryan has to get to the gym now. Our apologies... he'll be out tomorrow."

I was watching the spectacle out of curiosity. I heard a dad who was fourth in line when the line shut down. He grabbed his kid's hand and headed away in a huff. As they pass me, the kid says, "He won't sign anymore?"

And the dad says, "What a jerk!"



I'm no Nolan Ryan... Craig is of course, but I'm not. I just ask you guys to realize that we get requests to read pages all the time, to meet for coffee, to have lunch, to get some personal tips, to speak at conferences, to judge contests, etc. Amplify that by the fact that I edit a short story website in my "spare" time. EVERYONE has written a short story... even people who haven't finished scripts.

Anyway... I wish I (or we) could say yes to everyone. But we can't. I do try to answer all emails, but sometimes those answers are, "I can't right now." I hope you guys don't walk off in huffs and say "what a jerk."


This is a tough thing for people to grasp, but I think everyone here, most here, get it. I can't even imagine how many requests you get. There aren't enough hours in the day, especially if you want a life outside of writing. Then you have to wonder, who is your friend, who is giving the single white female vibe, who is actually cool. I've developed some pretty good friends that started as business contacts, but I'm always careful who I ask to read my stuff, out of consideration. Love Popcorn Fiction btw.

hscope
02-26-2011, 08:46 PM
I've never asked a pro writer to read my work; the ones who have were all masochistic volunteers.

Deion22
02-26-2011, 08:47 PM
I am reminded of the last year Nolan Ryan was pitching for the Rangers (did you figure out I am a baseball fan?)

Ryan agreed to sign autographs for an hour after each spring training game. One hour only.

Lines would form around the field, stretching as far as the eye could see.

Ryan would have a nice word to say to each fan as he signed their cards or baseballs.

After an hour, his handler would come out and say "sorry, but Mr. Ryan has to get to the gym now. Our apologies... he'll be out tomorrow."

I was watching the spectacle out of curiosity. I heard a dad who was fourth in line when the line shut down. He grabbed his kid's hand and headed away in a huff. As they pass me, the kid says, "He won't sign anymore?"

And the dad says, "What a jerk!"



I'm no Nolan Ryan... Craig is of course, but I'm not. I just ask you guys to realize that we get requests to read pages all the time, to meet for coffee, to have lunch, to get some personal tips, to speak at conferences, to judge contests, etc. Amplify that by the fact that I edit a short story website in my "spare" time. EVERYONE has written a short story... even people who haven't finished scripts.

Anyway... I wish I (or we) could say yes to everyone. But we can't. I do try to answer all emails, but sometimes those answers are, "I can't right now." I hope you guys don't walk off in huffs and say "what a jerk."

I think you, Koppelman, and Craig have paid it forward by what you're doing here posting. You're reaching thousands of writers by just posting and answering questions, instead of to just one individual writer. No one can really ask more than that. I think people have learned and been helped a lot more with all of your input.

Juno Styles
02-26-2011, 08:57 PM
yea i can only imagine the amount of PM's and emails the pros are getting since being active on the boards. while i havent been one that has asked to be read, i'm sure at least a third or less of the people you dont get to respond to or give a short reply are doing the "what a jerk" thing the dad did in derek's example.

Terrance Mulloy
02-26-2011, 09:14 PM
Anyway... I wish I (or we) could say yes to everyone. But we can't. I do try to answer all emails, but sometimes those answers are, "I can't right now." I hope you guys don't walk off in huffs and say "what a jerk."

The fact that you even bother to respond at all is enough for most of us.

You're one of the good guys, Derek.

Hamboogul
02-26-2011, 09:16 PM
The fact that you even bother to respond at all is enough for most of us.

You're one of the good guys, Derek.

+1

And because of that, I'm even watching WANTED on some Spanish station (no, I don't speak Spanish).

"Un simple hombre de oficina (James McAvoy) es reclutado por una misteriosa y despampanante mujer (Angelina Jolie) para que haga parte de un grupo de a"

Rantanplan
02-27-2011, 12:00 PM
Just to be clear, I wasn't talking about blind querying or hitting someone up for a read.

I was talking about a rep or producer requesting a script, whether from a query, contest placement or other, and then not responding to a follow-up inquiry.

There are those who do and those who don't, and those who do are a class act in my book.

NikeeGoddess
02-28-2011, 07:46 AM
Just to be clear, I wasn't talking about blind querying or hitting someone up for a read.

I was talking about a rep or producer requesting a script, whether from a query, contest placement or other, and then not responding to a follow-up inquiry.

There are those who do and those who don't, and those who do are a class act in my book.i sent "new year" e-cards to a few who read (or offered to read) my scripts last year. partly b/c it was a long distance hint that i'm still around but also to see who would respond. all i said was, "thank you for believing in me." the e-card had a notification when it was picked up and an "easy button" thank you reply. i got 50%... classy ;)

Gillyflower Cooms
02-28-2011, 08:25 AM
i sent "new year" e-cards to a few who read (or offered to read) my scripts last year. partly b/c it was a long distance hint that i'm still around but also to see who would respond. all i said was, "thank you for believing in me." the e-card had a notification when it was picked up and an "easy button" thank you reply. i got 50%... classy ;)


Did you send a "thank you" for their "your welcome" from your "thank you"? No? Not classy.

Richmond Weems
02-28-2011, 09:15 AM
Wait. Is this thread an ass-kissing thread? I need to know so I know whether to agree with anyone or not.

HH

Rantanplan
03-07-2011, 09:26 PM
Actually, that thread about the Contest Scripts, which basically said that they often collect dust in a big fat pile, remain unread and then eventually get recycled, leads me to think that:

We can never be sure if our scripts were even read, especially if we're unrepped writers. If contest scripts are low priority, even though they were specifically requested by reps or producers and even though they have in some way been pre-screened via the contest, then scripts arriving from requests off cold queries are probably even less of a priority. So maybe that's an even worse pile to be in. And so if we never hear back, sometimes it's because there is nothing to say because they never read the script. They saw something appealing in the logline and requested the script, then just got bogged down with work and never got around to it.

So: just one more frustrating aspect of this bitch of a biz.... :)

Storytell
03-07-2011, 10:49 PM
Thanks Rantanplan for posting.

I'm a nobody in the screenwiritng world and hardly feel qualified to offer comments or advice, but it's always bothered me that someone who requests a script doesn't at least respond back, especially after a follow up two months later, with a simple short email. "Sorry, pass."

Common courtesy shouldn't be discarded because there's no time for it. I know, I'm hopelessly out of touch with the reel world...

Fortean
03-08-2011, 12:19 AM
Remember when a handshake actually meant something?

http://msnbcmedia3.msn.com/j/ap/britain%20gadhafi%20western%20ties-1468689640_v2.grid-6x2.jpg

http://assets.nydailynews.com/img/2009/07/10/alg_obama_gadhafi.jpg

http://www.sofiaecho.com/shimg/zx500y290_1049178.jpg (http://www.sofiaecho.com/shimg/zx500y290_1049178.jpg)

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/world/images/attachement/jpg/site1/20080831/0013729e4ad90a243f5006.jpg


I remember being invited to attend Prime Minister Trudeau's being greeted at the White House by President Nixon, in 1969. Many Canucks were ushered into the Entrance Hall (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrance_Hall) as guests for the event, and I was a bit surprised by the crush of the mob pressing forward in the hope of shaking hands with Trudeau or Nixon. Standing back from this crowd, I was a bit more impressed by another gentleman, whom I recognized quietly standing nearby, (but who was ignored by this crowd). Neither Nixon nor Trudeau stopped to shake hands with anyone in the Canuck mob, (much to their disappointment); however, I had the pleasure of exchanging greetings with Eugene Allen (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/gallery/2008/11/06/GA2008110603114.html?sid=ST2010040103462), (whose life story may be made into a film (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/recount-scribe-pen-butler-83176)).

Ronaldinho
03-08-2011, 12:30 PM
I understand why people tend not to do that.

I was talking to a female friend of mine about online dating. She pointed something out:

The vast majority of the time, if she got a pleasant first email from a guy that she wasn't interested in, for whatever, reason, and she responded to politely say "thanks but no thanks," the guy took it as a cue to keep trying.

Even if everybody didn't do that, a high enough percentage did that writing "no thanks," emails became a pretty big chore. So she stopped writing them, and now, if you message her and she's not interested, she just won't respond.

I suspect that something similar happens with CEs. A certain percentage of the people they send nice rejection emails to see it as a crack in Hollywood's armor and try to squeeze through it any way they can. That's a rather substantial p.i.t.a. so they just smile and move on rather than send the emails.

Storytell
03-08-2011, 12:36 PM
I can understand not responding back to unsolicited emails but just don't with scripts they request. Seems to be just basic courtesy but I'm in the Midwest and maybe we're way to sensitive about such things. But I've certainly gotten use to the way things are done in the biz, so am pleasantly surprised when someone has the class to actually respond back.

Hamboogul
03-08-2011, 12:42 PM
I understand why people tend not to do that.

I was talking to a female friend of mine about online dating. She pointed something out:

The vast majority of the time, if she got a pleasant first email from a guy that she wasn't interested in, for whatever, reason, and she responded to politely say "thanks but no thanks," the guy took it as a cue to keep trying.

Even if everybody didn't do that, a high enough percentage did that writing "no thanks," emails became a pretty big chore. So she stopped writing them, and now, if you message her and she's not interested, she just won't respond.

I suspect that something similar happens with CEs. A certain percentage of the people they send nice rejection emails to see it as a crack in Hollywood's armor and try to squeeze through it any way they can. That's a rather substantial p.i.t.a. so they just smile and move on rather than send the emails.

My best friend is a CE at a studio. She used to write polite "no thanks" but these people would not stop pestering her... sometimes trying to add her to FB or following her on Twitter. So she went from "responding to every query" to "reading only through agents and managers she knows" in 2 months.

Juno Styles
03-08-2011, 01:36 PM
if they don't respond back over blind submissions/unsolicited queries, i honestly do not lose any sleep over it. i'm not so sure i'd consider someone "without class" if they don't respond on those though. even if they've requested a script and i dont hear back. whatever. i'll take that as not interested and keep moving. people are busy. i've done it to people who contact me about random things regarding wanting to be in the next short film or whatever. sometimes i respond sometimes i dont.

i met a girl on facebook who happened to work at a talent agency that represented a good amount of producers and some actors. told her about my script, she mentioned she knew of some investors, which was good because i have a 20 page investment/business package setup for the script as well. she says she'll give it to them and see what they think....then....nothing. no response back to my message a week or two later asking if she'd heard anything. no response to our 20 or 30 so back and forth messages by inbox. no response period. just a bunch of status updates about her damn kids and their Halloween play :|.

weird. no class. whatever. i'll never forget her name and face though for some reason. pissed me off.

MargoChanning
03-08-2011, 02:15 PM
It's not at all corny and you're absolutely right. Whenever I get a response like that, it galvanizes me to keep going.