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LauriD
03-19-2011, 11:03 AM
http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/03/21/110321fa_fact_goodyear (http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/03/21/110321fa_fact_goodyear)

"The writer was in despair. For a year and a half, he had been trying to write a script that he owed to a studio, and had been unable to produce anything. Finally, he started seeing a therapist. The therapist, Barry Michels, told him to close his eyes and focus on the things he was grateful for. The first time he did this, in the therapist’s office, there was a long silence. “What about your dog?” Michels asked. “O.K. I’m grateful for my dog,” the writer said after a while. “The sun?” “Fine, the sun,” the writer said. “I’m grateful for sun. Sometimes.”

Michels also told the writer to get an egg timer. Following Michels’s instructions, every day he set it for one minute, knelt in front of his computer in a posture of prayer, and begged the universe to help him write the worst sentence ever written. When the timer dinged, he would start typing. He told Michels that the exercise was stupid, pointless, and embarrassing, and it didn’t work. Michels told him to keep doing it.

A few weeks later, the writer was startled from his sleep by a voice: it sounded like a woman talking at a dinner party. He went to his computer, which was on a folding table in a corner of the room, and began to write a scene. Six weeks later, he had a hundred-and-sixty-five-page script. Six months after that, the script was shot, and when the movie came out the writer won an Academy Award."


Read more http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/03/21/110321fa_fact_goodyear#ixzz1H48zcIbO

Mac H.
03-20-2011, 04:27 PM
Which screenplay won the Academy award (either best original screenplay or best adapted) and had filming completed only 6 months after the first draft was submitted?

Oh - and the screenplay was 165 pages long?

If there isn't any project matching this then the opening anecdote is a fake.
If there is .. then the therapist had just broken patient confidentiality.

Either way .. it doesn't bode well for the honesty of the article!

Mac

Richmond Weems
03-20-2011, 04:56 PM
Which screenplay won the Academy award (either best original screenplay or best adapted) and had filming completed only 6 months after the first draft was submitted?

Oh - and the screenplay was 165 pages long?

If there isn't any project matching this then the opening anecdote is a fake.
If there is .. then the therapist had just broken patient confidentiality.

Either way .. it doesn't bode well for the honesty of the article!

Mac

Very few names were given, and I think it'd be hard to figure out which writer he was talking about. And how do you know that that first draft wasn't knocked down by about 40 pages? I'm pretty confident patient confidentiality wasn't breached.

It'd be one thing to suggest this was on a website that parties in half-truths and rumors, but quite another to suggest that Dana Goodyear and The New Yorker aren't "honest". The New Yorker's one of the best magazines being printed today. Get a subscription and you'll see.

HH (who originally put this link in the books and blogs or whatever the hell it's called thread)

Mario_C
03-20-2011, 05:02 PM
Couldn't the writer have just saved a few hundred bucks and just got a Netflix account? Or gone to the uptown Barnes 'n Borders and spent a few hours reading? Wow, some people have too much money.

- Mario, heartless bastard

Mac H.
03-20-2011, 05:27 PM
It'd be one thing to suggest this was on a website that parties in half-truths and rumors, but quite another to suggest that Dana Goodyear and The New Yorker aren't "honest". The New Yorker's one of the best magazines being printed today. Get a subscription and you'll see.But the therapist gave enough information to the New Yorker and Dana Goodyear so the anecdote can be verified? Seriously? Then by definition he has already violated confidentiality!

Therefore my original point remains .. I don't believe the that New Yorker *DID* verify with the patient that this anecdote was true. I could be wrong, of course. I have no real information .. it just isn't passing my 'sniff' test. I suspect, like most stories, it gets better every time.

Just like those psychics who give great anecdotes about how they helped the police solve murders.

OK - let's ignore the length of the screenplay. How many films won either the Best Original or Best Adapted screenplay and had filming completed only 6 months after the screenplay was completed?

Mac
(PS: See other post for caffeine withdrawal explanation of grumpiness)

Arroway
03-20-2011, 06:47 PM
"Would you see a therapist for writer's block?"

No. I'd get a library card and a Netflix account.

Ulysses
03-22-2011, 02:40 AM
Therapists are well known for fake stories.

All of Freud's "case studies" were fake.

If only therapists would visit each other and left the rest of the world alone with their soul quackery.

Richmond Weems
03-22-2011, 12:29 PM
But the therapist gave enough information to the New Yorker and Dana Goodyear so the anecdote can be verified? Seriously? Then by definition he has already violated confidentiality!

Therefore my original point remains .. I don't believe the that New Yorker *DID* verify with the patient that this anecdote was true. I could be wrong, of course. I have no real information .. it just isn't passing my 'sniff' test. I suspect, like most stories, it gets better every time.

I wasn't going to respond 'cause it's apparent that you're missing the forest for the trees, but then Ulysses chimed in so I thought I'd at least address it.

There are names used in the article. If you'd read it, you'd see that. Based on the way the article was written, it's apparent that Goodyear talked to the patients, then the therapists, and gave attribution when she could. It's also apparent that many of these 'Hollywood types' feel it's akin to being in some kind of exclusive club. If I remember correctly, the therapists haven't taken new patients in years.

The point of the article, to me, isn't so much whether the above anecdote is true or false, but that creative people are willing to pay a LOT of money for helping them out. It's like professional athletes paying for psychological help for the big games.

It was an interesting article. I didn't read it to try to figure out who was who, but to get an insight into the ridiculous amounts of money professionals are willing to pay for help. If it helped them, great. If it didn't, I don't have to worry about it 'cause I doubt I'll make enough money to afford that kind of therapy, anyway. Also, there were some neat little exercises in the article that some may find beneficial. I wouldn't, but that's just me. Maybe someone else would. And then the anecdote above won't matter if it's true or not.

HH

sc111
03-22-2011, 02:11 PM
My ex-husband was a therapist. I've know many therapists as a result. So the answer would be, "No."

Mac H.
03-22-2011, 04:48 PM
I wasn't going to respond 'cause it's apparent that you're missing the forest for the trees, but then Ulysses chimed in so I thought I'd at least address it.Yeah - I think I was just in a bad mood when I read the article.

If you look over my recent posts there was a spate of 3 where I was being particular annoyed by everything. I have no idea why - I'm still choosing to blame low quality coffee.

Thanks for the discussion though ... I'm glad my recently blighted outlook isn't justified !

Mac

Richmond Weems
03-22-2011, 06:35 PM
Yeah - I think I was just in a bad mood when I read the article.

If you look over my recent posts there was a spate of 3 where I was being particular annoyed by everything. I have no idea why - I'm still choosing to blame low quality coffee.

Thanks for the discussion though ... I'm glad my recently blighted outlook isn't justified !

Mac

No worries, Mac. On the other hand, I'm not sure your recently blighted outlook ISN'T justifed.

I've known a few people in the "therapist" business, and I can only think of one off-hand who seemed to be all there. Hell, I've got a good case to make that the last marriage counselor my ex and I saw actually helped my divorce along. (Yeah, yeah, I was never at fault.)

HH

sc111
03-22-2011, 07:36 PM
No worries, Mac. On the other hand, I'm not sure your recently blighted outlook ISN'T justifed.

I've known a few people in the "therapist" business, and I can only think of one off-hand who seemed to be all there. Hell, I've got a good case to make that the last marriage counselor my ex and I saw actually helped my divorce along. (Yeah, yeah, I was never at fault.)

HH

Me too. Me and the ex did a last ditch effort and went to counseling. The counsleor was intrigued -- she'd never had another counselor in for marriage counseling. After about 3 weeks, she called me in for a private session. She says to me, "Divorce him. Before he drives you crazy. He's starting to drive me crazy."

My totally unscientific opinion after being married to a therapist and meeting all his therapist cohorts. Maybe one out of ten know what they're doing. The rest actually need a good therapist. And likely went into the profession to "heal thyself."

Mario_C
03-22-2011, 10:26 PM
SC, ouch! But I hope it was for the best.
Therapists are well known for fake stories.

All of Freud's "case studies" were fake.

If only therapists would visit each other and left the rest of the world alone with their soul quackery.
There are legitimate uses for psychoanalysis and psychiatry, but the system is abused by insecure and lonely and neurotic people - Dr. Phil (yeah, yeah, I know) referred to his old career as a "rent-a-friend". :rolling: And it drives up the cost beyond the reach of those who actually need it.

nic.h
03-23-2011, 01:13 AM
Me too. Me and the ex did a last ditch effort and went to counseling. The counsleor was intrigued -- she'd never had another counselor in for marriage counseling. After about 3 weeks, she called me in for a private session. She says to me, "Divorce him. Before he drives you crazy. He's starting to drive me crazy."

That is spectacular. If that isn't in one of your scripts, I'm going to steal it. :)

sc111
03-23-2011, 06:59 AM
That is spectacular. If that isn't in one of your scripts, I'm going to steal it. :)


I did put one other moment in an early comedy. Not this one. But there's more. It wasn't painful at that point though. It was helpful as in confirmation it was indeed over. :)

Ulysses
03-24-2011, 03:54 PM
SC, ouch! But I hope it was for the best.

There are legitimate uses for psychoanalysis and psychiatry, but the system is abused by insecure and lonely and neurotic people - Dr. Phil (yeah, yeah, I know) referred to his old career as a "rent-a-friend". :rolling: And it drives up the cost beyond the reach of those who actually need it.

If you believe in psychoanalysis.

It's not a science. It's a belief system. And a great business: patients coming back for years, and developing pride of their symptoms and are getting experts in whining and self-pity.

It's a great system for psychoanalysts to not let forget their patients what they once experienced - and cash in on it.

Rent-a-friend is probably a good comparison. A real friend would do much better than any psychoanalyst.

It's so funny they claim to analyze the soul.

It's generally pointless to discuss with those who believe in psychoanalysis. It's a secular religion declaring itself as a science and as such a contradiction in itself and well sealed off from rational argumentation.

Richmond Weems
03-24-2011, 04:34 PM
It's generally pointless to discuss with those who believe in psychoanalysis. It's a secular religion declaring itself as a science and as such a contradiction in itself and well sealed off from rational argumentation.

Not really, but to each their own.

HH