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nightcrawler
03-28-2011, 12:26 PM
Hi guys.

Just wanted to get your opinion. I recently posted a script on Triggerstreet for some feedback. A woman emailed me saying she's in the producing program at New York Film Academy. She read my script and would really like to use it as her thesis film. Has anyone ever been in this position? Or has considered letting a student make their script?

She was real professional, and expressed her likeness of my script. She said in the program, she'll be guided by industry pros to develop and prepare my script by August this year. We'd have to sign an attachment agreement. Then, if there's enough money and actors attached, they'd shoot it.

What do you guys think?

Juno Styles
03-28-2011, 12:45 PM
I think it sounds interesting. Are there any profits involved after its done? Like is she going to be entering it into any festivals or trying to get distribution if it performs well?

The bigger question is what was your original hope for the script?

Whatever you do I'd get an airtight agreement drawn up by a lawyer. Don't half step that if you move forward with her. There are going to be a lot of eyes on your work and it'll get passed around a lot....not sure how an agent or manager or studio would feel if they were interested ...it all depends on how you feel about the script though IMO.

Hamboogul
03-28-2011, 12:54 PM
I think it sounds interesting. Are there any profits involved after its done? Like is she going to be entering it into any festivals or trying to get distribution if it performs well?

The bigger question is what was your original hope for the script?

Whatever you do I'd get an airtight agreement drawn up by a lawyer. Don't half step that if you move forward with her. There are going to be a lot of eyes on your work and it'll get passed around a lot....not sure how an agent or manager or studio would feel if they were interested ...it all depends on how you feel about the script though IMO.


Really? Involve a lawyer for a standard dollar agreement between a film student and a writer?

nightcrawler
03-28-2011, 01:01 PM
Hamboogul, Can you tell me what the dollar standard agreement between a student film and a writer is? I'm not sure what I do next.

nightcrawler
03-28-2011, 01:02 PM
@JunoStyles - Well the script is written intentionally as an indie. I wrote it to where it could be made with a small budget. Although, I feel like it's a script that can draw in actors. I may be biased though. I wrote it after all.

I'll ask those questions you mentioned.

jcgary
03-28-2011, 01:04 PM
If this person wants to wake up every morning thinking to herself, "How am I gonna get Nightcrawler's script made?" then the answer is yes, yes, that's what you want.

My one caveat is I'd have the contract lay out that you're the only writer allowed to work on the project (if that's what you want).

Hamboogul
03-28-2011, 01:07 PM
Hamboogul, Can you tell me what the dollar standard agreement between a student film and a writer is? I'm not sure what I do next.

Each film school has a cookie cutter standard agreement that they'll give the film student to secure rights to a script so they can produce or film their thesis project.

It's been standard at all the major film schools. The idea is that the student director uses ALL of his/her resources toward the actual production of the film.

Now if you think your script is financially viable, then don't do this. But if you think this person can shoot the film, possibly be the next John Singleton, and/or you feel you'll gain a lot of experience from this, go ahead and do it.

Please don't involve a lawyer in things like this. It's just a student film. There are times to involve lawyers for aspects of your career but this isn't probably the time.

That being said, I have very low opinion of New York Film Academy because it's the University of Phoenix of film schools.

nightcrawler
03-28-2011, 01:17 PM
Thank you for the replies guys! I will be asking her if she has the director in mind, and if it's a fellow student, then I'd want to see his/her previous films. She's just the producer. No, I probably won't get a lawyer involved, but I will find out more about the attachment agreement.

Juno Styles
03-28-2011, 02:06 PM
Really? Involve a lawyer for a standard dollar agreement between a film student and a writer?

I asked the OP additional questions to find out what the intentions were of the producer/student or whoever else was involved. He mentioned they'd sign an "agreement"...no mention of dollar agreement specifically, so I didn't assume. If the film turns out great and they decide to make other plans to get $$$ I imagine a standard dollar agreement may or may not cover whatever monetary terms he wants. Again, with more info and dialogue he can make that decision once they know what the future plan is for the film.

@JunoStyles - Well the script is written intentionally as an indie. I wrote it to where it could be made with a small budget. Although, I feel like it's a script that can draw in actors. I may be biased though. I wrote it after all.

I'll ask those questions you mentioned.

Oh okay cool, I thought it may be something you were writing trying to get that big spec sale, whatever. :)

one seven spectrum
03-28-2011, 03:16 PM
That's awesome dude!

We write screenplays to have them produced. Sure, you might not earn big bucks from it, but I dare say you've got a Producer here who, while maybe not as experienced as other Producers - she sure is keen to get your story made.

That's gold. Congrats mate.

Ronnie Danjer
03-28-2011, 03:30 PM
Sorry to go off topic, but what is the deal with triggerstreet? Don't they hold perpetual rights of use on work submitted to their site? I was scared off by their over-reaching terms of use agreement. Anybody have thoughts on this? Does their agreement limit your rights or reduce the project's chances of commercial success?

nightcrawler
03-28-2011, 04:37 PM
@Ronnie - I think if your script makes screenplay of the month, they have a first look 90 day right to your script I think. It gives them time to review the top script of that month and decide whether or not they'd want to pursue it. I have yet to see this happen though. So I guess after 90 days of being screenplay of the month, you're free to take it anywhere. But as far as I know, it's only the screenplay of the months in which they do this, not all the scripts submitted.

@one_seven -- Thanks! I'm waiting on her reply.