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VanceVanCleaf
05-23-2011, 08:37 AM
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Joaneasley
05-23-2011, 10:38 AM
Good luck on your submission. We all go through a lot of rejection, and it's normal to feel a little nervous/excited when you submit.

To give you a little more ability to believe you're ready to submit, get feedback from other writers first. There are always writers who want people's reactions to their scripts and they will give you their reactions to yours in exchange. If you get a few reactions from other writers on your script before you send it out to the industry, you have more confidence that you've written a script at least some people really like.

ihavebiglips
05-24-2011, 04:59 AM
thanks...

now the next 'horrible' thing happened: someone wants to call me because of the script. :eek:

Does this happen to you, you struggle like hell to get noticed, and when you finally get, you start to tremble and wish you'd never have written a word? Or I'm the only poor one...?

I know I have to overcome this, I know...
I start in preparing all sorts of answers concerning my work - or do you consider this wrong? I just don't want to lose track or struggling for words because of language problems. But of course it should not sound as if I 'read' a paper....

Be careful of becoming your own worst enemy.

Think of yourself as a ball player... do you want to be Will The Thrill or Jason Heyward - one of those guys who step up to the plate and own it, knocking the ball out the park in their first Major League at bat... or do you want to be one of the countless scores of other guys who defeated himself in the on deck circle and strikes out?

Own that ****. The best thing you can do is be a normal, personable person and BE AN AUTHORITY on your own story. If you know your script inside and out like you should, there is no reason to go over all of these neurotic questions and stress yourself out. There is nothing they can say to stump you.

If they like the script, they are likely calling to get to see about YOU as well (if this is a rep).

Don't show them your ass. Act like you can knock a script out at a high level every few months, not that this was some labor of love that took you years or a few short, inspired weeks to accomplish. If they call to talk about YOU, do that - don't keep steering the conversation in directions. Don't seem desperate or needy.

Be the guy they wanna work with. If it's about the script: again - don't get defensive or explain your work in detail. Keep it breezy and follow their lead. They do these kinds of calls all the time. So do successful writers. At least appear to be one, if you can.

And good luck!

Joaneasley
05-24-2011, 12:07 PM
I think it's smart to have answers ready for the questions you'll likely encounter, and even to rehearse the answers so that you sound natural and not like you're reading. A lot of writers, including me, are observers, more comfortable in the background than as the center of attention, and we can get flustered when we're forced to think of quick answers in tense situations. If we were more outgoing, we might not be writers.

I know a writer who was interviewed for the Warner Brothers Comedy Writers Workshop but didn't get in... until the next year, when he came prepared with rehearsed but natural-sounding funny conversation.


thanks...

now the next 'horrible' thing happened: someone wants to call me because of the script. :eek:

Does this happen to you, you struggle like hell to get noticed, and when you finally get, you start to tremble and wish you'd never have written a word? Or I'm the only poor one...?

I know I have to overcome this, I know...
I start in preparing all sorts of answers concerning my work - or do you consider this wrong? I just don't want to lose track or struggling for words because of language problems. But of course it should not sound as if I 'read' a paper....

Joe Unidos
05-27-2011, 01:54 PM
Haha no one called. And I was in naked panic for the last days. Well, cost me some years of my useless life again. :o

Admins, this topic can now be deleted, thx.

Others can learn from the advice you were given. Why delete it?

Laura Reyna
05-27-2011, 02:28 PM
When I got my 1st call on a script, I was soooo nervous. I probably didn't make much sense to the guy.

The 2nd call (from another manager) was better. I was less stressed & probably sounded like an actual human.

I suspect the next time I talk to someone in the industry about one of my scripts it'll be even less stressful.

Like anything else, you get better & more confident with practice.

VanceVanCleaf
05-28-2011, 05:47 AM
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