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JenkinsD
06-08-2012, 10:15 AM
Okay so here is my dilemma. I wrote a script that is getting some serious interest as a studio film. I really want to direct, however since it would be my first feature the word I'm getting is it is a really tough sell. I have directed short films, and my last was very well received at a top tier festival. So my question is how hard do I fight to stay attached? I could try to go the indie route but the film deserves a bigger budget...

Thanks for any advice...

Johnny Boy
06-08-2012, 11:07 AM
I think this is a question only you can answer.

SoCalScribe
06-08-2012, 11:10 AM
Okay so here is my dilemma. I wrote a script that is getting some serious interest as a studio film. I really want to direct, however since it would be my first feature the word I'm getting is it is a really tough sell. I have directed short films, and my last was very well received at a top tier festival. So my question is how hard do I fight to stay attached? I could try to go the indie route but the film deserves a bigger budget...

Thanks for any advice...

What's more important to you, selling the script or directing the movie? In every negotiation, there are always dealbreaker terms. If selling the script is more important, you have to be willing to give up the directing if it becomes a dealbreaker for the company to let you direct (i.e. if you insist on directing, they won't buy the project). If directing the movie is more important, you have to be willing to say, "Okay, if that's a dealbreaker, then I guess we don't have a deal." That means no money for the script, no more company support for the project, etc.

How hard you fight is not the issue (you should always fight hard for what you want)... figuring out what's more important to you (script sale or directing) is the issue because that will determine at what point you need to compromise to get what you want.

Juno Styles
06-08-2012, 01:10 PM
It is a tough sell when all you've done is short films no matter how well received it was. It's more of a gamble for them because you haven't been "tested" yet directing a feature film where there are a hundred more places you can f%*k up. On the flip side, until you direct that first feature film with name talent (and not a micro budget feature either) then you will always have to play this game when dealing with a studio. Personally I think you should negotiate as hard as you can to direct until you get their final offer. If they're really trying to buy the script you're in a win-win situation regardless. Good luck.

holly
06-08-2012, 02:00 PM
heres the thing - you can't do it tepidly. you can't toss out the idea that youd really like to direct, if they'd consider that. youve got to be absolutely, resolutely (but politely and collaboratively) confident that you're the guy to direct it. and only you.

impossible things happen all the time. im the girl that sold my first script and i ran my first series. i also once had a job where i decided if first time directors should direct their own scripts.

what they want to see is total confidence. you can't waver in any way and you've got to answer every question tossed at you perfectly. many first timers have made excellent first features. they know this. be that guy. self assured, confident. have the conversation with every buyer. if everyone says no, you can still sell the script. good luck.

JoeDonBaked
06-08-2012, 02:19 PM
Direct the next one.

Geoff Alexander
06-08-2012, 03:58 PM
heres the thing - you can't do it tepidly. you can't toss out the idea that youd really like to direct, if they'd consider that. youve got to be absolutely, resolutely (but politely and collaboratively) confident that you're the guy to direct it. and only you.

impossible things happen all the time. im the girl that sold my first script and i ran my first series. i also once had a job where i decided if first time directors should direct their own scripts.

what they want to see is total confidence. you can't waver in any way and you've got to answer every question tossed at you perfectly. many first timers have made excellent first features. they know this. be that guy. self assured, confident. have the conversation with every buyer. if everyone says no, you can still sell the script. good luck.

GOLD!

holly
06-08-2012, 04:10 PM
Direct the next one.

part of the confidence and self assuredness they want to see in any director is evidenced in someone who has the balls to know they are ready, right now. your odds arent a whole lot better on the second one, frankly. and there may not be one.

Levenger
06-08-2012, 04:23 PM
You're better off trying to impress whichever producer first and having them back you if they feel you could do it.

ATB
06-08-2012, 04:24 PM
What about putting together a teaser? Kinda like what the writers of Grimm Night did... It would give a sense of what you could do with this story.

Then again, your shorts (if in the same genre) should give them an idea of what you're capable of...

JoeDonBaked
06-08-2012, 04:38 PM
part of the confidence and self assuredness they want to see in any director is evidenced in someone who has the balls to know they are ready, right now. your odds arent a whole lot better on the second one, frankly. and there may not be one.

There's always Kickstarter, folks.

TravisPickle
06-08-2012, 10:10 PM
I say... buckle up, hit the craps table, and grab the bull by the balls, baby.