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Mintclub
02-13-2013, 07:55 PM
Hey guys and gals,

I'm flying over for my first batch of LA meetings next week. Met all the movers and shakers back in London this past year so am used to being in rooms with UK execs (us Brits can be quite reserved!) but any advice from DD'ers who've had their fair share of meet and greets around town would be most appreciated...

Knaight
02-13-2013, 08:07 PM
Get there early, use the bathroom, take the water.

Have a few good ideas to pitch. Be yourself. Be excited. Don't be weird.

Most of all -- enjoy it!

JoeBanks
02-13-2013, 08:28 PM
wear something skimpy

Armak
02-13-2013, 09:49 PM
Shave your legs. During the meeting, start rubbing your calf up and down on their leg. Don't change your expression.

CColoredClown
02-13-2013, 10:49 PM
Bring some coke.

ducky1288
02-14-2013, 01:10 AM
Definitely agree on the bathroom and water, it seems to hit you right before you go in.

Be relaxed and be yourself unless you're weird then try to be someone who is less weird.

YakMan
02-14-2013, 12:20 PM
Ooookaaaay peepuls :rolleyes: . . . separating the wheat from the chaff . . . we look to John August for some "generals" insight:

http://johnaugust.com/2009/what-should-i-do-in-a-general-meeting

:cool:

m.j.r.
02-14-2013, 12:34 PM
http://johnaugust.com/2008/how-to-meet

This is good too.

Levenger
02-14-2013, 01:01 PM
If a conversation about football arises, hit them with this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4msKdfMtGY

Hamboogul
02-14-2013, 01:10 PM
John August covers great points. A few additional things to consider...

Most general meetings are during the 11AM, 3PM, and 5PM slots. Know that with 5PM slots, you will need to account for heavy LA traffic. If you are given flexibility, try to get the 11AM slot because that's when they are least hurried. 3PM tends to have executives who might be tired after a long day or a big lunch. At 5PM, they are more concerned about returning all the calls they missed during the day.

For studio meetings, arrive at least 15 minutes early to the gate. Make sure you have a valid license or passport. Otherwise, you drove all that way for nothing.

Sign of a good meeting is the energy level. Just because your meeting lasted 20 minutes doesn't mean it was bad. Conversely, just because a meeting went an hour doesn't mean it was great.

Try to send a thank you email within 24 hours of your meeting. And make sure you highlight one or two discussion points from the meeting.

Hasil Adkins
02-14-2013, 01:11 PM
If you don't have a smart phone, get a car with GPS.

Bring money because assistants sometimes don't give you enough validation stickers.

Breath mints.

If you are prone to sweaty palms, blame it on the condensation on the water bottle.

There are some freaky ass aggressive squirrels at Disney. Do not make eye contact.

BenJacoby
02-14-2013, 01:29 PM
Bring some coke.

Do not bring coke. This is insulting. Instead, offer to buy coke at a generous price from the executive you're meeting.

m.j.r.
02-14-2013, 02:14 PM
You do coke?

BenJacoby
02-14-2013, 02:50 PM
You do coke?

Only when it comes in a can with bubbles and corn syrup.

glantern2814
02-14-2013, 05:17 PM
Hey guys and gals,

I'm flying over for my first batch of LA meetings next week. Met all the movers and shakers back in London this past year so am used to being in rooms with UK execs (us Brits can be quite reserved!) but any advice from DD'ers who've had their fair share of meet and greets around town would be most appreciated...

Being both American and British, here are a few things I learned of note:
--UK executives are way more polite. They'll reject your script, then send you a long letter of apology. US execs usually don't even acknowledge receiving it half the time.
--Americans in general are intimidated by British accents. It's a reverse prejudice -- if you speak with a British accent (even if its something like Welsh or Yorkshire), then they automatically assume you are smarter than they are. This rule may not apply in Hollywood, however.
--Brits seem genetically engineered to arrive at a place exactly on time (e.g. Phileas Fogg). Given LA traffic, assume long delays.

cmmora
02-14-2013, 05:28 PM
--Americans in general are intimidated by British accents. It's a reverse prejudice -- if you speak with a British accent (even if its something like Welsh or Yorkshire), then they automatically assume you are smarter than they are. This rule may not apply in Hollywood, however.


This rule also does not apply in San Francisco... :) (sorry, I couldn't resist to not invade this thread.)

Bill WiggleArrow
02-14-2013, 06:18 PM
Don't be a classy European and wear a suit and tie. Suits are for the power folks. Writers are casual. Jeans and jacket work.

JoJo
02-18-2013, 08:25 AM
Being both American and British, here are a few things I learned of note:

--Americans in general are intimidated by British accents. It's a reverse prejudice -- if you speak with a British accent (even if its something like Welsh or Yorkshire), then they automatically assume you are smarter than they are.

WTF? Maybe cause I'm a New Yorker I'm not intimidated by anybody, fancy-pants accent or not. I sure as hell don't assume anyone is smarter than me either because they speak with a British accent. :rolleyes:

carcar
02-18-2013, 09:37 AM
Shave your legs. During the meeting, start rubbing your calf up and down on their leg. Don't change your expression.

Depending on your gender, this could actually work quite well.

Knaight
02-18-2013, 07:34 PM
I assume that anyone who doesn't sound American is smarter than me because they're not American.

ScriptGal
02-18-2013, 08:14 PM
Don't be a classy European and wear a suit and tie. Suits are for the power folks. Writers are casual. Jeans and jacket work.

YES! God - no suits, no ties. Jeans and an untucked Oxford is considered dressy for most writers.

ClintW3
02-18-2013, 08:54 PM
But Robert Ben Garant & Thomas Lennon always suit up. So they say in the vastly entertaining "Writing Movies for Fun and Profit!"

WaitForIt
02-18-2013, 11:31 PM
I assume that anyone who doesn't sound American is smarter than me because they're not American.

ding ding ding!

Mintclub
03-07-2013, 08:09 PM
Meetings went great. Appreciate all the tips peeps.

I'm curious about something though:

When a script doesn't sell and instead becomes a sample. What's deemed a good # of meetings off the back of said spec?

Levenger
03-08-2013, 12:56 PM
It's all relative. I'd rather have one meeting with an exec who really loved my work and is excited to try to cook something up than ten free bottles of water from guys who my reps pushed into sitting down with me.

Geoff Alexander
03-08-2013, 04:46 PM
Meetings went great. Appreciate all the tips peeps.

I'm curious about something though:

When a script doesn't sell and instead becomes a sample. What's deemed a good # of meetings off the back of said spec?

Depends on how many people read it--also, Levenger is right that it's better to get meetings with people who really want to meet with you than folks that your reps had to push or ask for the meeting.

JoJo
03-10-2013, 09:55 AM
I assume that anyone who doesn't sound American is smarter than me because they're not American.

NYers believe they're smarter than everyone, American or not, and a lot of the Hollywood types are from NY... kinda hard to intimidate..

Just sayin'.

Hamboogul
03-10-2013, 12:47 PM
Meetings went great. Appreciate all the tips peeps.

I'm curious about something though:

When a script doesn't sell and instead becomes a sample. What's deemed a good # of meetings off the back of said spec?

Among the writers I know who recently were introduced to Hollywood via their spec scripts, the meetings ranged from 4 to 130+. But with each general, it's an opportunity for the executive to put a face behind the script so that the person can remember you when a writing opportunity arises.

NYNEX
03-11-2013, 03:27 AM
Being both American and British, here are a few things I learned of note:
--UK executives are way more polite. They'll reject your script, then send you a long letter of apology. US execs usually don't even acknowledge receiving it half the time.
--Americans in general are intimidated by British accents. It's a reverse prejudice -- if you speak with a British accent (even if its something like Welsh or Yorkshire), then they automatically assume you are smarter than they are. This rule may not apply in Hollywood, however.
--Brits seem genetically engineered to arrive at a place exactly on time (e.g. Phileas Fogg). Given LA traffic, assume long delays.

You have a lot of British accents that are nearly indecipherable by American standards. Its far from automatic that Americans think British accents sound smart. And when you really talk to someone, regardless of what country they are from, its pretty easy to pick out people who live a high end life from those who live a low end life.

cmmora
03-11-2013, 12:49 PM
I was recently in a cafe working on my latest spec script where there were three people behind me talking. As I often do, I was listening in on the conversation, taking notes, in case anything good was said. They were 2 girls and one guy. The guy had a French accent, one girl had an Irish accent and the third girl had an English accent. I did not have any trouble understanding the French guy or the Irish girl. But the girl speaking English -- I did not understand a word she said. I am not familiar with all the different accents they have in England, but this girl's accent sounded like a mumble, gutterable. She sounded like she was not educated in the slightest, even though she might have been, since her friends sounded intelligent and if she was hanging with them she also must have brought something to the table. I was disappointed to not understand her, because whenever she spoke her friends would laugh as if they had heard the funnest joke imaginable. I come from immigrant parents, so I think I have the ability to decipher any and all accents and from any country if they are trying to speak in English. But her accent will forever leave me wondering.

cshel
03-11-2013, 02:19 PM
This thread has moved far afield, but...

The singer, Adele, cracks me up because her speaking voice/accent is so different than you would expect if you just saw her perform. She always looks so mature and refined for her age. Then she has this beautiful singing voice. But when she opens her mouth to speak, she has this cockney? type accent, and she swears like a sailor, and she's hilarious. One more reason to love Adele. :)

CJ Walley
03-12-2013, 10:34 AM
She sounded like she was not educated in the slightest... whenever she spoke her friends would laugh as if they had heard the funnest joke imaginable.

Sounds like what you may have spotted here is the Common English Northerner. Was she drinking a pint? If so, did she throw it at anybody?

cmmora
03-12-2013, 12:38 PM
Sounds like what you may have spotted here is the Common English Northerner. Was she drinking a pint? If so, did she throw it at anybody?

Yes, she was drinking a pint, but was not throwing it at anyone. Now, that would have been a sight. A pretty girl attacking her friends.