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IanAgard
05-02-2013, 06:00 PM
As you probably know, one of the most desirable yet challenging industries to make a living from is in the film and television industry.

By far, the most commonly asked question I receive from people throughout my six years working as actor, screenwriter, director and film producer is...how do you get into the industry and make a living?
As a film producer; I have interviewed, hired and worked with several casts and crews while making my films. It becomes quite easy to notice the difference between individuals who struggle to find film/tv work and those who make a comfortable living.

Is it about luck?

Or

Who you know?

I would like to share with you 5 POWERFUL TIPS that will help you jumpstart your film/tv career and get you on the road towards landing more paying industry work than you can handle.

TIP Number One: Be Willing To Work For Free
I know, you probably didn't want to hear that but it's imperative that you are willing to either work for free or very low pay. It's a sacrifice that many in the entertainment industry must do when starting out, however, you'll have the opportunity to meet others in the business as well as learn on the job. Taking "free" jobs quickly leads to full time careers.

TIP Number Two: Attitude Is Everything
This is one of the most important tips regarding developing a successful film/tv industry career. More important than your talent, your experience or your education; your attitude will determine how far you will rise within your career.

It will determine if people will refer job opportunities to you or hire you again for future projects. You must be a flexible, professional, team oriented person who is committed to "serving" the story/project to the best of your ability.
Production sets are full of egos, there's no need for one more.

TIP Number Three: Recognize and seize opportunity
You've probably heard the old saying luck is when preparation meets opportunity. I like to believe in a slightly different statement, luck = opportunity + willingness.

A certain film/tv industry work opportunity might present itself to you; you're prepared...but are you willing to maybe work for free, work for low pay, work 12 hour days, be team-oriented, be flexible and agreeable or go the extra mile to help the project succeed.

TIP Number Four: Network and be visible
The reality of the film/TV industry is that most production jobs are never advertised. Those positions are usually filled through word of mouth and pre-established relationships. That's why it is extremely important for you to always be committed to meeting new like-minded people.

The best places to meet and connect with people who share your zeal and passion are:

1) Onset while shooting a movie or television show
2) Through industry specific classes
3) At film festivals

TIP Number Five: Always be learning
As humans, we are learning machines. We are most alive and functioning closest to our potential when we are learning, adapting, adjusting and finding new ways, approaches and techniques to improve our lives (and our careers)in some way.

No matter how many years working experience you might have within the film/TV industry it would be hugely important for you to maintain a beginner's mindset. A beginner looks constantly for one new tibit, one or more ways to expand on their current expertise

ATB
05-02-2013, 06:18 PM
But wait! THERE'S MORE!

TIP Number Six: If at first you don't succeed, become a screenwriting guru.

Just visit becomeascreenwritingguru.com

SundownInRetreat
05-02-2013, 06:24 PM
Nothing like "powerful tips" that don't actually say anything.

IMO, the best way to jumpstart your screenwriting career is the same as what could end it: wait until you're a few scripts in (ie: traces of novice should have declined) and get a pro to read and give brutally honest criticism of your ability.

In some cases it will be the eye opener to move on with your life but in others it will be the wake up call required to up your game or else - kinda like someone who has failed to quit a bad habit having a gun pointed at their head.

Richmond Weems
05-02-2013, 08:15 PM
What the hell is "seizure opportunity"? Does this mean I have to become epileptic to be a screenwriter?

slupo
05-02-2013, 08:39 PM
I think this post is a "seizure opportunity."

Juno Styles
05-02-2013, 10:47 PM
Smfh....

EdFury
05-02-2013, 11:34 PM
TIP Number One: Be Willing To Work For Free
I know, you probably didn't want to hear that but it's imperative that you are willing to either work for free or very low pay. It's a sacrifice that many in the entertainment industry must do when starting out, however, you'll have the opportunity to meet others in the business as well as learn on the job. Taking "free" jobs quickly leads to full time careers.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

You first. It's always to good to let others profit from your hard work. Uh huh. And taking free jobs QUICKLY leads to full time careers? Wow... quickly huh? What color is the sky in your world?

tuukka
05-03-2013, 08:35 AM
With the "powerful tips" headline, I kind of anticipated a silly list.

But as someone who is a professional in the industry, I agree with those five points.

And if you think those things are obvious: I've noticed that most people who want to work in the industry, don't follow those principles, leading to weak careers, or no careers at all.

So there is no harm in reciting those things.

odocoileus
05-03-2013, 09:08 AM
TIP Number Three: Recognize and seizure opportunity


:bounce::rolling::dunce: :rolling::bounce:

Sweeney Todd
05-03-2013, 09:37 AM
I love that one of the tips is "Be Willing to Work For Free" when the website is selling an e-book titled How to Make Money as a Screenwriter.

:confused:

Procrastinator
05-03-2013, 10:02 AM
By far, the most commonly asked question I receive from people throughout my six years working


And that's where I stopped.

stainjm
05-03-2013, 10:02 AM
Aren't people being a bit harsh? It's good advice, considering everyone gets there in random ways/ no path seems the same.

Procrastinator
05-03-2013, 10:04 AM
Aren't people being a bit harsh? It's good advice, considering everyone gets there in random ways/ no path seems the same.



I think people around here are skeptical when it comes to "gurus", especially ones promoting eBooks.

JeffLowell
05-03-2013, 11:04 AM
Aren't people being a bit harsh? It's good advice, considering everyone gets there in random ways/ no path seems the same.

Considering how many people who are experts in the field (Mazin, August, Elliott, Rossio, etc, etc) that give advice away for free, isn't there something a little off about people who aren't experts and charge for it?

slupo
05-03-2013, 11:10 AM
Aren't people being a bit harsh? It's good advice, considering everyone gets there in random ways/ no path seems the same.

We're being harsh because it's lame spam. Where are the mods?

tuukka
05-03-2013, 11:11 AM
With the "powerful tips" headline, I kind of anticipated a silly list.

But as someone who is a professional in the industry, I agree with those five points.

And if you think those things are obvious: I've noticed that most people who want to work in the industry, don't follow those principles, leading to weak careers, or no careers at all.

So there is no harm in reciting those things.

While I stand by my original comment, I didn't realize that the OP is essentially spam.

The thread should be probably locked.

bjamin
05-03-2013, 11:17 AM
If you want to try and make money from selling eBooks, more power to you. If you want to spend your money on purchasing an eBook so you can "jumpstart your career," well I wish you all the best. I'm not sure why so many are hating on this person. JMHO


*I wrote this before I realized the post was spam. whatever. it is what it is

LateNightWriter
05-03-2013, 11:38 AM
The OP put up his pitch in the wrong category. It should have been posted under "Announcements, News, Opportunities" in the GENERAL category, where the mods would have screened it for validity before allowing it.

Perhaps the announcement should be moved there?

Just my $.02.

Late Night Writer
Whoops! Didn't see that it already has been posted there.

Hamboogul
05-03-2013, 11:45 AM
I miss Ron Aberdeen.

JeffLowell
05-03-2013, 12:04 PM
If you say his name two more times, he appears.

Please don't.

Juno Styles
05-03-2013, 12:06 PM
I don't think it's spam in the typical sense though because he's already posted this in the Announcements, Articles, etc section. This is the Business Questions and Advice section so technically he's within bounds to post this here. He's giving advice. It may be bad advice or "no sh*t advice" but it is advice. He just conveniently happens to have his link in his signature to go buy his ebook. It's not like he said "and by the way buy my book."

But let me stop there because it sounds like I'm endorsing this....I typed "smfh" earlier because my first thought is that this "advice" is primarily to get people to click the link and buy the book. :|

Idk...seems to be a grey area to me. Doesn't seem like dude should be selling advice at all if he's still at the level of needed advice/feedback himself from random writers on a messageboard (http://messageboard.donedealpro.com/boards/showthread.php?t=70748).

slupo
05-03-2013, 01:22 PM
All right. I saw the post about his e-book (13 pages!) and then this so I figured it was straight up spam. So I'll just say it's spammy.

But worse than that, he is trying to give advice about how to make a living as a screenwriter when he clearly isn't himself.

I mean, his "powerful tips" are so general you could apply them to anything.

UpandComing
05-03-2013, 01:23 PM
Idk...seems to be a grey area to me. Doesn't seem like dude should be selling advice at all if he's still at the level of needed advice/feedback himself from random writers on a messageboard (http://messageboard.donedealpro.com/boards/showthread.php?t=70748).

Oh no you di'int....lol...

Juno Styles
05-03-2013, 02:16 PM
Oh no you di'int....lol...

Words carefully chosen btw ;)

ATB
05-03-2013, 03:11 PM
Doesn't seem like dude should be selling advice at all if he's still at the level of needed advice/feedback himself from random writers on a messageboard (http://messageboard.donedealpro.com/boards/showthread.php?t=70748).

Now I just feel sorry for him...

I mean at least he's not the bum on the sidewalk mumbling for change. He's the voiceover dude in Ohio who offers a quick, baritone paragraph of narration for your $3.99.

At least he's cheap. So, I mean... there's that.

wcmartell
05-03-2013, 03:47 PM
Wait - it's 13 pages for $3.99? My Blue Books are around 200 pages for $2.99.

- Bill

mikejc
05-03-2013, 04:19 PM
The five points are the same 5 points you could give to anyone pursuing any kind of career.

Perhaps his book has various versions with just the title changed.

stainjm
05-03-2013, 05:01 PM
Considering how many people who are experts in the field (Mazin, August, Elliott, Rossio, etc, etc) that give advice away for free, isn't there something a little off about people who aren't experts and charge for it?

Yes.

Juno Styles
05-03-2013, 05:15 PM
Wait - it's 13 pages for $3.99? My Blue Books are around 200 pages for $2.99.

- Bill

Worth every penny btw. Broke me out of a recent writer's block. Was just telling another writer yesterday to check them out.

davidjohnhall
05-03-2013, 07:02 PM
Worth every penny btw. Broke me out of a recent writer's block. Was just telling another writer yesterday to check them out.

Same here. Those Blue Books are non-stop awesome. Bought two this week.

tuukka
05-04-2013, 02:23 AM
All right. I saw the post about his e-book (13 pages!) and then this so I figured it was straight up spam. So I'll just say it's spammy.

But worse than that, he is trying to give advice about how to make a living as a screenwriter when he clearly isn't himself.

I mean, his "powerful tips" are so general you could apply them to anything.

It probable that he has collected those ideas from pros.

But I don't think they easily apply to any career.

In most fields of work you don't start by working free. In TV and film industry, you typically do.

In most fields of work, jobs are usually advertised, and many people try to apply. In TV and film industry, they are not. You get jobs on "I know this guy, he's really good" basis.

There was already one member of this board who strongly disagreed with the "work free" aspect. So this is not useless advice, even if it's connected to spam.

DangoForth
05-04-2013, 04:37 AM
Wait - it's 13 pages for $3.99? My Blue Books are around 200 pages for $2.99.
- Bill

See, Bill? PROOF that you are cheap and easy...
:)

Richmond Weems
05-04-2013, 05:21 AM
Ron Aberdeen. Ron--

I can't do it. I'm scared.

JoJo
05-04-2013, 09:05 AM
Wait - it's 13 pages for $3.99? My Blue Books are around 200 pages for $2.99.

- Bill

And are golden!

mikejc
05-04-2013, 09:11 AM
It probable that he has collected those ideas from pros.

But I don't think they easily apply to any career.

In most fields of work you don't start by working free. In TV and film industry, you typically do.

In most fields of work, jobs are usually advertised, and many people try to apply. In TV and film industry, they are not. You get jobs on "I know this guy, he's really good" basis.

There was already one member of this board who strongly disagreed with the "work free" aspect. So this is not useless advice, even if it's connected to spam.

I guess you've never heard of an internship.

odocoileus
05-04-2013, 02:13 PM
Agard's trying to sell his weak product in a market that's already overcrowded with much better products, many available at low cost or free. This is a terrible business plan. He's wasting his time. He'd be delivering more value, to himself, and to society, if he got a hack's license and started driving cab.

Craig Mazin
05-09-2013, 02:02 PM
Here are FIVE POWERFUL TIPS!

ONE! If you work for free, you too can have Ian Agard's exciting career!

TWO! BLAH BLAH BLAH!

THREE! WHOOP DEE HOO HA HAY!

FOUR! ???????

FIVE! PROFIT!

Juno Styles
05-09-2013, 03:08 PM
This damn thread is full of powerful tips. :)

UpandComing
05-09-2013, 04:36 PM
Here are FIVE POWERFUL TIPS!

ONE! If you work for free, you too can have Ian Agard's exciting career!

TWO! BLAH BLAH BLAH!

THREE! WHOOP DEE HOO HA HAY!

FOUR! ???????

FIVE! PROFIT!

Testimonial:

I followed Craig Mazin's plan, and now I am a Screenwriting Superstar!! :thumbsup:

EdFury
05-09-2013, 07:54 PM
Here are FIVE POWERFUL TIPS!

ONE! If you work for free, you too can have Ian Agard's exciting career!

TWO! BLAH BLAH BLAH!

THREE! WHOOP DEE HOO HA HAY!

FOUR! ???????

FIVE! PROFIT!

Best List Ever. How much are you charging???

mikejc
05-10-2013, 10:07 AM
Craig, I think you have an undiscovered career as a motivational speaker.

The Mazin Method.

Richmond Weems
05-10-2013, 07:43 PM
I use the Mazin Method on my girlfriend.

Wait. I don't have a girlfriend. So what the hell have I been doing all this time???

Staircaseghost
05-10-2013, 08:08 PM
I jumpstarted my career with this ONE WEIRD OLD TRICK

MoonHill
05-11-2013, 09:27 AM
I jumpstarted my career with a 12-volt lead-acid battery system delivering 2.5 amps! Really got my motor running!

wcmartell
05-11-2013, 11:00 PM
I used jumping jacks with Jack LaLanne!

- Bill

BurOak
05-12-2013, 08:37 AM
I jumpstarted my career with this ONE WEIRD OLD TRICK

The one WEIRD OLD TRICK that doctors/accountants/mechanics/the IRS don't want you to know about and that language professors/plastic surgeons hate?

NYNEX
05-13-2013, 03:59 AM
TIP Number One: Be Willing To Work For Free
I know, you probably didn't want to hear that but it's imperative that you are willing to either work for free or very low pay. It's a sacrifice that many in the entertainment industry must do when starting out, however, you'll have the opportunity to meet others in the business as well as learn on the job. Taking "free" jobs quickly leads to full time careers.


Unfortunately, rent, bills, medical costs, food, cellphone, internet, among other costs are not free. Are you suggesting people who want to enter the industry move into a homeless shelter and/or get on WELFARE? I'm going to say this is pretty bad advice.

I've met people who broke in who had day jobs in the industry, who broke in via networking, who won some sort of award or got into some major screenwriting lab (think Sundance), etc. If you're a 19 year old college student, a free internship may make sense if you have parental support and you're doing something to pad your resume. But for any one else, its to the point where you need to borrow the lines from the prostitute Satine from Moulin Rouge. "There's no way 'cause you can't pay".

With that said, there's nothing wrong with say volunteering for film festival or some sort of special event like that. Something that has a short time period of involvement. But there are so called internships that expect people to work full time (for free) and I'm sorry, that's for idiots, especially if you aren't a college student. Just like a hooker doesn't work for free, artists have to be able to support themselves as well.

tuukka
05-15-2013, 05:25 AM
I guess you've never heard of an internship.

You should be doing a lot of free work long before you apply for internship. Once you start writing as a hobby, you should attach yourself to a lot of projects, to hone your skills. And at that amateur level, you're typically not getting paid. You're an amateur, and you are writing for other amateurs, for amateur projects.

In Europe, free internships are the most typical model. But interns get unemployment fees, etc. In USA most interns get paid (very, very little), but free internships are becoming more common.

Most ambitious interns I've known kept on attaching themselves to short-term side-projects (Short films, music videos, etc) where they didn't get paid.

When you get an entry-level internship at some production company, it often happens that they won't allow you to do what you really want to do. They have already pro's doing it, and you're not yet good enough. Which is why you keep on working on unpaid projects, where you do get to do exactly what you want to do. To hone your skills.

The Road Warrior
06-05-2013, 09:08 AM
As you probably know, one of the most desirable yet challenging industries to make a living from is in the film and television industry.

By far, the most commonly asked question I receive from people throughout my six years working as actor, screenwriter, director and film producer is...how do you get into the industry and make a living?
As a film producer; I have interviewed, hired and worked with several casts and crews while making my films. It becomes quite easy to notice the difference between individuals who struggle to find film/tv work and those who make a comfortable living.

Is it about luck?

Or

Who you know?

I would like to share with you 5 POWERFUL TIPS that will help you jumpstart your film/tv career and get you on the road towards landing more paying industry work than you can handle.

TIP Number One: Be Willing To Work For Free
I know, you probably didn't want to hear that but it's imperative that you are willing to either work for free or very low pay. It's a sacrifice that many in the entertainment industry must do when starting out, however, you'll have the opportunity to meet others in the business as well as learn on the job. Taking "free" jobs quickly leads to full time careers.

TIP Number Two: Attitude Is Everything
This is one of the most important tips regarding developing a successful film/tv industry career. More important than your talent, your experience or your education; your attitude will determine how far you will rise within your career.

It will determine if people will refer job opportunities to you or hire you again for future projects. You must be a flexible, professional, team oriented person who is committed to "serving" the story/project to the best of your ability.
Production sets are full of egos, there's no need for one more.

TIP Number Three: Recognize and seize opportunity
You've probably heard the old saying luck is when preparation meets opportunity. I like to believe in a slightly different statement, luck = opportunity + willingness.

A certain film/tv industry work opportunity might present itself to you; you're prepared...but are you willing to maybe work for free, work for low pay, work 12 hour days, be team-oriented, be flexible and agreeable or go the extra mile to help the project succeed.

TIP Number Four: Network and be visible
The reality of the film/TV industry is that most production jobs are never advertised. Those positions are usually filled through word of mouth and pre-established relationships. That's why it is extremely important for you to always be committed to meeting new like-minded people.

The best places to meet and connect with people who share your zeal and passion are:

1) Onset while shooting a movie or television show
2) Through industry specific classes
3) At film festivals

TIP Number Five: Always be learning
As humans, we are learning machines. We are most alive and functioning closest to our potential when we are learning, adapting, adjusting and finding new ways, approaches and techniques to improve our lives (and our careers)in some way.

No matter how many years working experience you might have within the film/TV industry it would be hugely important for you to maintain a beginner's mindset. A beginner looks constantly for one new tibit, one or more ways to expand on their current expertise


.


I'D PREFER... FIVE POWERFUL LIPS!


.

The Road Warrior
06-05-2013, 09:19 AM
What the hell is "seizure opportunity"? Does this mean I have to become epileptic to be a screenwriter?

I believe It's just mugger parlance - for when you collapse in the street and somebody takes your wallet!

Terrance Mulloy
06-05-2013, 07:50 PM
What the hell is "seizure opportunity"?

It's Carpe Diem for invalids.

Vance
06-06-2013, 12:05 AM
I jumpstarted my career with this ONE WEIRD OLD TRICK

This is how Uncle Frank wound up with community service and having to talk to schoolkids about the reality of STDs.

LIMAMA
06-06-2013, 02:57 PM
Always late to the party. Maybe this guru should take some tips from the Michael Douglas method of, uhm, acting.

;)

BurOak
06-06-2013, 07:36 PM
This is how Uncle Frank wound up with community service and having to talk to schoolkids about the reality of STDs.

:cool:

Juno Styles
06-07-2013, 11:41 AM
Boy did this guy pick the wrong website/forum to try and preach to lol