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View Full Version : Is a Los Angeles Address/Phone Number Really Important?


Swashbuckler
01-31-2014, 02:54 PM
Some have warned that agents, managers, and producers won't even take a new writer seriously if s/he lives outside Los Angeles.

Since I'm not an Los Angeleno, should I get a L.A. mailing address and phone number for contact info purposes?

And would a PMB be good enough for mail or can anyone suggest something better?

grumpywriter
01-31-2014, 03:48 PM
I wouldn't worry about it. Just worry about writing a great script. If you have a great script, they won't care if you're living in Iceland...

ATB
01-31-2014, 04:01 PM
No.

jtwg50
01-31-2014, 04:06 PM
+1 to ATB and Grumpy. If your script is great, it doesn't matter if you live on Mars or anywhere else. The logline and the script are all that matter.

Swashbuckler
01-31-2014, 04:22 PM
But they have to read the script first.

Obviously Joss Whedon could live in Outer Mongolia and nobody in Hollywood would care. But Whedon is a known quantity.

Is the standard different for a new writer, an unknown quanity?

(Put another way: with 100,000+ new specs already out there, do Hollywood readers come up with dumb excuses not to read a script just to lighten their reading load?)

Ronaldinho
01-31-2014, 04:24 PM
Home addresses aren't as common on scripts as they used to be, anyway. People just use email.

As far as phone numbers, most people keep the number they had before they moved to LA anyway, so an area code no longer tells people where you live.

MJ Scribe
01-31-2014, 04:27 PM
All above are correct...

As far as getting read, the logline itself normally inspires interest for a read. As such, most email queries normally don't include your phone number to for the first contact.

Bunker
01-31-2014, 05:52 PM
I've been in LA for 10 years, and I still have my Portland area code. Nobody has cared.

And, as Ronaldinho said, all your initial communication with people will be via email. And email doesn't betray your location.

jboffer
01-31-2014, 06:13 PM
No, but you can always be tricky and get yourself a free google voice number with an LA area code.

ducky1288
01-31-2014, 07:36 PM
Also if they think you're in LA they are gonna want to meet and then you'll have to tell them you lied you don't live there and that's not a good way to start off a relationship.

Just write, get it requested, send, then worry about that.

wcmartell
01-31-2014, 08:59 PM
No.

And getting one, thinking that you are fooling people will backfire the minute you get a call for a meeting in 2 hours at Sony (which might take me 2 hours to get to from the valley). Anything that is deceptive is a bad idea, those things always backfire big time. Just be you...

Bill

IGetsBuckets
01-31-2014, 09:20 PM
But they have to read the script first.

Obviously Joss Whedon could live in Outer Mongolia and nobody in Hollywood would care. But Whedon is a known quantity.

Is the standard different for a new writer, an unknown quanity?

(Put another way: with 100,000+ new specs already out there, do Hollywood readers come up with dumb excuses not to read a script just to lighten their reading load?)

I don't live in LA, nor do I have an LA area code.

I was offered representation before they even knew where I lived. We were about half-an-hour into our conversation before they ask, "So, where are you located?"

Nobody cares where you live. You can be from Antarctica. All you need is a great script.

Patrick Sweeney
01-31-2014, 10:22 PM
That's what stopped me from following the advice you hear of getting an LA number - so, great, I fool someone into thinking I'm in LA, how exactly do I continue pulling this off once they start asking me to come in for meetings?

jtwg50
02-01-2014, 08:11 AM
OP: For what's it's worth, I've written four spec scripts. Two have been optioned and one sold. That script goes into production later this year. I also just completed a writing assignment for a film that is shooting in L.A. right now with a pretty significant cast. I live 3,000 miles away in Florida and I'm 63 years old. As I often point out, if I can do it, anybody can do it.
And I am never asked where I live or how old I am.
All you need is a strong script and a logline that gets it read in the first place. Location means nothing. FYI, there are several big-name working pros that come here to DD that do not live in L.A. Just focus on your scripts and everything else will take care if itself.

Swashbuckler
02-05-2014, 11:47 AM
Thanks, guys, I appreciate your advice. It's settled then:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nl4SRVXgGiI

finalact4
02-05-2014, 01:14 PM
OP: For what's it's worth, I've written four spec scripts. Two have been optioned and one sold. That script goes into production later this year. I also just completed a writing assignment for a film that is shooting in L.A. right now with a pretty significant cast. I live 3,000 miles away in Florida and I'm 63 years old. As I often point out, if I can do it, anybody can do it.
And I am never asked where I live or how old I am.
All you need is a strong script and a logline that gets it read in the first place. Location means nothing. FYI, there are several big-name working pros that come here to DD that do not live in L.A. Just focus on your scripts and everything else will take care if itself.

I think I love you. :)

sppeterson
02-05-2014, 03:38 PM
As a counterpoint...

I had been seeking representation for a time while on the East Coast -- had even worked with a big management company developing a script, visited the company once on a trip to L.A. -- and no offer of representation.

A few months later a junior agent liked one of my new scripts and wondered if we could meet. Fortunately, he was going on vacation at the time so it wasn't an immediate meeting. I did some research on the company and saw somewhere online where they mentioned they specifically only repped writers in L.A.

I flew out to L.A., sublet a room for the summer, and at the meeting told him that, yes, I was living here.

That's how I got my first agent.

I've been living here ever since and it's amazing how much more progress I've made in the last 2.5 years than in the previous 8.