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-   -   Fatal Flaw? (http://messageboard.donedealpro.com/boards/showthread.php?t=54124)

instant_karma 04-01-2010 10:33 AM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by NikeeGoddess (Post 632384)
here's my take that i posted several pages back.

redd talks about how he spent so many years inside that he didn't think he could survive in the real world. remember when the first old guy got released and hung himself? redd thought he was on that same path but andy's desire to get out of that prison even after 17 years inspired him to survive out there. that's why redd is the protagonist and andy is the main character.

To me, that's just a character's arc being altered by interacting with the protagonist. Which should happen to a greater or lesser degree with almost every major character the protagonist encounters. Again, I think this has already been quite well established in various story telling theories, and I don't see the need to try and create a new storytelling device to address a problem that doesn't exist.

ScreenplayQA 04-01-2010 10:58 AM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
Can you make it that the USB is encrypted and can only be decrypted by inserting it into a specif computer with the proper MAC address [ Media Access Control ]

That solves your issue right there.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steven Jenkins (Post 630975)
I just spotted a huge flaw in my story - but think it isn't critical. Just after some advice :)

My plot is about getting a mem-stick with vitally important data on it to a particular person & place.

My flaw is that this data could feasibly be uploaded to the person via the internet, or the mem-stick posted in the mail, which kinda undermines my hero's hazardous trek across the country.

I'm covering this flaw by exposing that the mem-stick is hardware protected, so if it's inserted into a standard USB port the data gets fried - and if it's posted in the mail it could get intercepted by the authrities who are hunting for the mem-stick.

This arse-covering seems a bit feeble I know, but I'm still feeling kinda safe here because my flaw is the self-same one I've just spotted in STAR-WARS, and nobody else ever seems to have done so.

What do you think? Am I safe on this one, or not?

Many thanks :)

Steve Jenkins
rebel base
3rd planet on left past death-star
galaxy far-far-way

hmm!
Maybe I just answered my own question.


Steven Jenkins 04-01-2010 11:13 AM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
Thanks for the hint :)

I was more thinking along the lines of USB voltage, with the higher voltage of a standard USB burning out the circuits.

But that would have needed unnecessary exposition.

I thought about a give-away line that it's protected, which later turns out to be a lie.

But in the end I've abandoned that ploy altogether, and made the antagonist (the cat :) ) want my hero to read the contents as part of her cunning stunt. ;)

ScreenplayQA 04-01-2010 11:15 AM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
hahaha

if you ever need any computer/hacker ideas just let me know. I'm a programmer for a living - ya know until someone decides to pay me to write about stuff, instead of actually doing stuff.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steven Jenkins (Post 632406)
Thanks for the hint :)

I was more thinking along the lines of USB voltage, with the higher voltage of a standard USB burning out the circuits.

But that would have needed unnecessary exposition.

I thought about a give-away line that it's protected, which later turns out to be a lie.

But in the end I've abandoned that ploy altogether, and made the antagonist (the cat :) ) want my hero to read the contents as part of her cunning stunt.


sarajb 04-01-2010 12:20 PM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JimHull (Post 632378)
Re: loglines for Shawshank and Casablanca

I have an idea where you are headed with this question, but before I bite...

In my estimation, loglines are about as useful to an author as the concept of "raising the stakes." They're great for development executives and the back of DVD boxes, but they don't really give a writer the tools necessary to write a complete story. They are reductive and meaningless and should not be a part of the creative process as they don't delineate any structural features of a story.

Reductive in a good way. Loglines are crucial to my creative process, crucial as headlights on a car.

Protagonist, antagonist, goal and stakes - understanding a story at its base lets a writer see where other elements should build, branch and connect. Loglines aren't mandatory, but they're really not meaningless endeavors.

zenplato 04-01-2010 12:58 PM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
I think this guy is pulling our chain. Surely no one really thinks like Jim does.

Rick as the antag?

JimHull 04-01-2010 01:00 PM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
LOL - if you read any of my posts, I never once stated that Rick is the Antagonist. Maj. Strasser is clearly the Antagonist.

Re: Red as simply being the Narrator

Red has a problem that many of the other inmates share, namely, that they easily go along with whatever the warden or any of the other guards tell them to do. They have become institutionalized. The thing that elevates Red beyond his fellow inmates, at least as far as dramatic structure goes, is that we get a close intimate look into what that it feels like to think this way. The parole hearings are scenes that are solely all about Red. We don't get scenes like that with any of the other characters (you could argue that there is the section with Brooks when he is let go, but I would say that is more of a substory, whereas Red's storyline is key throughout.

Through his relationship with Andy, Red changes and transforms the way he looks at life. I believe his relationship with Andy is the heart of the story, in much the same way that Rick's relationship with Ilsa is the heart of "Casablanca." Andy does not have this kind of relationship with any other character in the story and is another reason why I would argue that it elevates Red beyond simply the guy telling the story. When he chooses to "get busy living" he is basically telling us that he has adopted Andy's way of seeing things. When he tells the parole board to basically shove it up their ass, he is finally standing up to the system like Andy did. Andy's was on a much larger scale, Red's was more of a personal one.

Red's storyline gives the audience the opportunity to experience what it is like to be a person who has lost all hope, who has become an institutional man and who goes along with whatever is told him. And then it gives us the very emotional experience of what it would be like to stand up against those who oppress you and transform yourself into someone who believes that "hope springs eternal." While this experience is somewhat mirrored in Andy's storyline, it is presented in a more objectified manner and what's more, I would argue that Andy had that sense of hope from the very beginning. Sure, there were moments when he had his doubts, but when it came right down to it, he stuck to his guns and stuck it to the warden.

Steven Jenkins 04-01-2010 01:13 PM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by zenplato (Post 632441)
I think this guy is pulling our chain. Surely no one really thinks like Jim does.
Rick as the antag?

Somebody was pulling MY chain when I suggested Rick may be Lazlo's Antag (not the Story's Antag).

There's some big parrallels between Casablanca and Scrooge, I'm certain. Scrooge is unquestionably the antagonising protag, the same way as Rick is.

But on the other hand, Bob Cratchit isn't at the forefront of a global and noble cause, putting his life in danger at every turn.

Also, Dickens wasn't trying to show some heroic type leading a noble cause in the background, while in the forground the story's MC just watches on the sidelines agonising about something intensely personal. However, I do believe both authors almost scream at their audience the question: "notice anything familier".

But I wont mumble any more rubbish about this. At the end of the day what the hell do I know about multiple storylines. I'm struggling with just one.

zenplato 04-01-2010 01:18 PM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by JimHull (Post 632442)
LOL - if you read any of my posts, I never once stated that Rick is the Antagonist. Maj. Strasser is clearly the Antagonist.

You might as well have...I mean seriously, what are you trying to say other than you are confused about the dramatic elements.

Have you ever read Poetics by Aristotle? I think that's a good start...

zenplato 04-01-2010 01:28 PM

Re: Fatal Flaw?
 
Sorry Jim, I've confused your and Steve's posts.

Please accept my apology...

Steve...have you read Poetics? lol!!!


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