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Old 05-09-2018, 06:55 PM   #31
TigerFang
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 1,661
Default Re: How important is voice in screenwriting?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerFang View Post
I think any read is cleaner without “we see” and better, too.... As ever, Story trumps quirky writing every time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerFang View Post
The shuttlecock about screenwriting “rules” and “gurus” gets bandied about here too often. (meaning that I don't agree with “guru rules.”)

There's no debate. Find your “voice” and write what you will.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Centos View Post
And yet we still have people parroting these nonsensical claptrap "rules" on a regular basis.
Not I. Read me again in a different light. I only don't like or use “We see.” Others, Like Jeff Lowell, have no issue with it. I would not condemn a screenplay for using it. I only say that I don't use it. In my estimation, a screenplay is written to be seen, so I see no value in using “We see” in my screenplays. It's not an adherence to a “rule,” it's a choice, my choice.

Once again, previous quotes from me: “There's no debate. Find your “voice” and write what you will.” “Story trumps quirky writing every time.”

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffLowell View Post
I trot this out every once in awhile. It's time again.

I was a final round reader for Austin a few times. During one of these debates, I pulled up the twelve scripts I was sent. They were all by amateur writers. These scripts had all made it through multiple rounds of readers to the finals of one of the most prestigious competitions.

So not only did the scripts advance to me - disproving the "readers use violations of 'rules' to toss scripts" argument, but it disproves the "only pros can do it" argument.

And before someone says it: if you want to adhere to a bunch of made up rules, have fun. But don't believe it if someone says you shouldn't.
Thank you (but does the last sentence need an edit?). All of them must have been great STORIES to advance that far. Those writers found their voice for those stories and executed them well, well enough to make the grade even with flashbacks (Citizen Kane, Casablanca, The Godfather Part II anyone?), voiceover (Cannery Row, Goodfellas, Adaptation, Apocalypse Now, A Clockwork Orange, The Big Lebowski, The Shawshank Redemption, All About Eve, Sunset Boulevard, anyone?) and other so-called “mistakes” as touted by rule-mongers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Centos View Post
I wasn't responding to your post. I was responding to a single line in TigerFang's post. I didn't see anything objectionable in what you wrote.
Shuttlecock poppycock. Read me again in a different light. Oftentimes, I get the distinct impression that many of the boys here are just spoiling for a fight instead of merely airing their writing preferences. I notice that the ladies here always seem to take the high road.

Once again: “There's no debate. Find your “voice” and write what you will.” “Story trumps quirky writing every time.”
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Last edited by TigerFang : 05-10-2018 at 04:37 AM.
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