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Old 01-14-2018, 07:34 PM   #7
StoryWriter
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Default Re: How do you signify a short break between two different shots?

I like the way David Trottier suggests to do it. (Just an opinion.)

Quote:
Master scenes and secondary scenes revisited
Lets go to another example. As you know, you begin a scene with a master scene heading, which names the master (or primary) location; for example, EXT. SMITH HOUSE - DAY. Other locations (such as BEDROOM or HALLWAY) that are part of the master location are called secondary locations; the resulting heading is called a secondary scene heading.

In addition, its okay to add a secondary location to a master (primary) location in a master scene heading. Ill illustrate all of these points below.

First, well begin with the master scene heading that includes a secondary location and then move to other secondary locations.
INT. SMITH HOUSE LIVING ROOM DAY

John slams the front door and races down the

HALLWAY

and into his

BEDROOM

where he dives on top of his bed and sobs.

The above is correct, but it could have just as easily been written like this, which is also correct:

INT. SMITH HOUSE DAY

LIVING ROOM

John slams the front door and races out.

HALLWAY

He runs past pictures of his family.

IN THE BEDROOM

He stumbles in and falls on his bed sobbing.

As you can see, any number of secondary headings can follow as long as the locations are part of the master (primary) location. Once we change the camera placement to an exterior location or to a location that is not part of the master location, we must create a new master scene heading.
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