Thread: Nicholl 2019
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Old 03-03-2019, 07:49 PM   #26
finalact4
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Default Re: Nicholl 2019

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Originally Posted by UpandComing View Post
Hey finalact4, thanks for providing this insight. It seems that you thought both managers were strong contenders. Just curious about what made you ultimately choose one over the other. Were there more than a few factors? And did you not get a sense of his producorial leanings when considering him? I get the sense that writers should ask this question upfront so they can know what to expect.
if i'm honest, and i like to be, my manager was very excited about my spec. i mean, i couldn't believe how excited he was about it and i just had a really great feeling. i had just started sending it out and they both requested it within a day of receiving my query ad read it immediately.

i'd had about 14 read requests from cold queries and black list 8s and 9s really helped with that. i even emailed every manager that requested it to read and told them when it was no longer available out of respect for their time. they were gracious and every single one congratulated me.

the second rep, who i will be reaching out to when my new spec it ready, was just as excited. said he was "so bummed," and when i told him that i signed with someone, he immediately called him, on his own, i didn't give him his number or contact info, just to tell my manager how lucky he thought my manager was.

and i'm not sure, but maybe part of the problem with the option, that i would not have been privy to, was the fact that my manager was attaching as a producer. maybe the other party wasn't so keen on that, i'll never know. i wouldn't have been a party to those conversations. who knows.

i was just so happy to have a manager, i just let things slide after the first two specs. and in my opinion he is excellent at guiding you to make the script shine. you know, things that are in your head and no quite on the page.

i could tell he wasn't into 'managing' and really only wanted to develop things he was interested in.

i was pretty disappointed that one day i had a manager and like that, i didn't. no meetings. sent me some copies of the emails he sent out, but didn't cc me on anything.

i'd like to know from other writers how they keep track of who's been sent your spec? does your manager just tell you "it went out to such and such and this was their response" or are you, as the writer, cc'd on everything? it would seem the party receiving the information might be more forthright with their opinion of the script if the writer was not on the cc.

i'm hesitant to tell this story, but i think women need to hear it--

i will say, one thing that happened that i thought was the most disappointing. i was invited to a location set where they were filming a pilot and it was amazing. i really learned a lot just watching the actors, director and crew.

i met one of the actors and we chatted about passion for our craft and how he got started and how i got started. a real nice, professional feeling conversation.

it took me like 3 1/2 hours to get there, including a ferry, and after i left to go home, i got a call from my manager saying that the actor was really impressed with me and wanted to know if i would come back for to have dinner with him.

i mean, he was trying to play it off like it was all innocent and funny, but he kept coming back around to getting me to travel back. this actor was in a very famous movie in the 80s, so he's like my father's age. i'd just spent almost 7 hours traveling. ugh.

i finally had to say, "tell him i've got a boyfriend." he was pushing pretty hard and i felt very uncomfortable and when he pushed one last time, "so it's a no?" i said firmly, "yes, it's a no." i don't think i've ever been so insulted. i've dealt with that kind of **** my whole life. i learned a very good lesson, i think. i'll be more up front this next time with my expectations. i know he just wanted to make the actor happy, but damn, i'm not a ****ing booty call.

anyway, i'm hoping this is a good year. right now i'm fortunate enough to be writing full time. not sure how long it will last, but busting my ass everyday to get as much writing in as possible.

good luck to all.
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