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Old 05-31-2020, 06:12 PM   #11
Bono
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Default Re: Midpoint

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Originally Posted by Satriales View Post
Caught in the tractor beam is def the midpoint, IMO.
I just posted my post after typing it for 25 minutes and see you beat me too it. But technically i beat you as I was typing first! Seriously -- agreed.
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Old 05-31-2020, 06:27 PM   #12
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Default Re: Midpoint

Readers get bored fast and if they’ve actually made it to your midpoint without getting bored then your story will need a kick in the ass, a shot of adrenaline something new added to the ingredients to spice it up and get the reader’s interest rejuvenated. There’s lots of ways to do this depending on the genre. In romcoms this is the point where one of the exes return like in Along Came Polly. New characters are a good way to get the reader excited again. Another is to reveal that a friend to the hero is really a foe. This character who we thought was a good friend of the hero is really on the side of the antagonist. Sometimes the midpoint raises the stakes and makes things life or death, we see all the time the wife and child of the hero abducted by the villain.

Whatever your midpoint is, it has to get your reader excited enough to read to the end.
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Old 05-31-2020, 06:36 PM   #13
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Default Re: Midpoint

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Originally Posted by Cyfress View Post
if they’ve actually made it to your midpoint without getting bored then your story will need a kick in the ass, a shot of adrenaline something new added to the ingredients to spice it up
Which is exactly what the midpoint does. As I, and probably others, already stated.


Quote:
In Romcoms this is the point where one of the exes return like in Along Came Polly....Another is to reveal that a friend to the hero is really a foe. This character who we thought was a good friend of the hero is really on the side of the antagonist.
Which are all examples of point of no return and ticking clocks, as I, and probably others, already stated.
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Old 05-31-2020, 07:06 PM   #14
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Default Re: Midpoint

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Originally Posted by JoeBanks View Post
But the rebellion wasn't on Alderaan. If it had not been blown up, Ben would have delivered the plans to Leia's father and Luke would have been free to go about his life. Maybe he still would have gone with the plans to Yavin but storywise, no Alderaan means he's locked in to the rest of Act II: saving Leia, escaping the Death Star, and delivering Artoo in the absence of Ben. In a way that takes all other options off the table (my recollection from having an old laserdisc version is the side flip halfway through comes exactly when the Falcon is dropping out of hyperspace into the asteroid field)
Except it was blown up.

Luke wanted to join the rebellion from the start of the film. He talked about it on Tatooine when he heard C3PO and R2D2 say they were part of the rebellion. His eyes were always on the stars.

Obiwan said, "you must come to Alderan and learn the ways of the force," Luke "refuses the call" says I can't I have to help my family on the farm. He leaves to find R2D2 and they discover Aunt Beru and Uncle Owen are murdered.

That was the only reason keeping him on Tatooine, and when they were murdered all his ties were cut, and he was free to learn the ways of the force. The entire trip to Alderan is where Luke begins his first lessons to become a Jedi and learn the ways of the force.

That was his goal. To learn the ways of the force. Become a Jedi. At that moment, they are trying to disable the tractor beam so they can continue on their journey-- Luke to become an apprentice and Obiwan to deliver the plans to the republic. Then...

So, I checked the script, and exactly in the middle of the script is when Luke discovers Princess Leia is on the Death Star and Luke talks Han into helping him save her. He convinces Han by telling him the reward would be, "well more than you can imagine." "I can imagine a lot kid."

This is Luke's moment of no return. He has firmly sided with the rebellion in that moment, not only to become a Jedi Apprentice, but to fight the good fight. He has chosen his path and because he has chosen to save Princess Leia he will forever be hunted down by the Empire. At that moment he becomes a fugitive and his old life as he knew it, is gone. He can never be Luke from Tatooine again, and instead becomes, Luke the rebel.

There are a lot of great beats in this middle 30 pages. But if Luke didn't try to save the Princess, the story would be over. There is always questions about Star Wars, but it follows the Heroes Journey to a T.

The point of a midpoint turn is to TURN the story in a new direction. The tractor beam is an obstacle that is preventing them from from continuing on their journey. In order to continue their journey they must first disable the Tractor beam in order to escape. It doesn't change their goal, it is ONLY when they discover the Princess is on board in the detention center and they decide to save her does the story turn (for our hero) into a new direction. As stated above.
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Old 05-31-2020, 07:24 PM   #15
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Default Re: Midpoint

I didn’t read beyond the original post before I wrote mine up. But what’s your point in quoting my post and then state others have said it. You were the 6th or 7th poster on the thread Sundown, do you really think you didn’t repeat anything that was said? Why did you single my post out?
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Old 05-31-2020, 07:38 PM   #16
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Default Re: Midpoint

I think it's clear Cyfress -- she was raising the stakes of this thread!!!! We are at the Midpoint!!!
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Old 05-31-2020, 07:41 PM   #17
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Default Re: Midpoint

Found this from some blog talking about Syd Field's breakdown of a New Hope. I think we are all saying the same midpoint. Sometimes it's not just 1 scene. And honestly I recall SPACEBALLS a lot more than STAR WARS.

For example, in Star Wars a New Hope, the startling new revelation is that Alderaan has been destroyed and they are caught in the grip of tractor beam from the Death Star. The first half of Act 2 is all about Luke and Obi-Wan finding a ship and taking the droids to Alderaan. The second half of Act 2 is all about rescuing Princess Leia and escaping from the Death Star
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Old 05-31-2020, 08:45 PM   #18
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Default Re: Midpoint

The problem with the labels we find in theory is that good art, quality art is not that formulaic. A random person can’t go buy a screenwriting book and then drop an inciting incident, first act climax, midpoint, 2nd act climax, and resolution into a script and have a solid story. Often times I wonder if we’re just labeling events that are a product of focused, forward momentum to a character’s journey. And I think that’s what the classical structure paradigm tries to do is promote forward progression of a story. It’s so easy to meander and even when we think we aren’t doing it when we let that first reader read the pages they point out spots in scenes, in sequences, in acts where they thought we We’re wasting time and slowing the story.

I always tell writers I read for that it’s about the scenes between the major plot points. What’s happening in there? Good writers have a great command of character. They can writer natural, realistic voices. They know how to create things like a shadow, a need, a want. They know how to challenge the character, they know how to reveal character. As best you can you should try to have some kind of win or loss for the hero. Some big, some small., but some kind of challenge is the only thing worth reading. Again, easy to say. Extremely hard to do but I think being cognizant of it helps.
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Old 05-31-2020, 09:06 PM   #19
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Default Re: Midpoint

We aren't making good art. We are writing spec screenplays to sell. There is surely a road make (formula) to what makes a movie work.

Always exceptions, yada yada -- but let's be real. There are just things that are true about good stories and people can change it around, but it all means the same thing.

I feel screenwriter is not that far away from learning the rules of basketball. Same rules for everyone. But each player (thus script) is unique in it's own way, but you still understand it's a person trying to play basketball (or it's a spec).

To be clear -- I don't find writing a piece of art to fit a specific medium formulatic -- I find it's just what it is. A bagel is a bagel. So I don't equate knowing the formula to making bad art.

Another way -- we all are at home making banana bread. Same basic recipe. But man do they all taste different. And unique. But all technically banana bread. But if someone baked a shovel -- that's just wrong. You can to know what is required so you can let your art flourish.

In a way it's exciting to be limited to 110 pages and people expecting things to happen. What a fun challenge vs writing a book that can be 100 pages or 1000 pages.
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Old 05-31-2020, 09:17 PM   #20
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Default Re: Midpoint

There's lots of people that know and understand the theory of story, but a small percentage of them have the craftsmanship to pull those "theories" off on the page. Knowing the road to story will only get you so far. You need to know how to build the road and to that there is no playbook.
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