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Old 05-23-2019, 01:47 PM   #1
GhostWhite
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Default Shadowing a Writers Room

One of the creators of a hit show has invited me to sit in the room for a week to learn how they break their stories, but I'm not really sure how to maximize this experience. He's a big fan of my creative work outside of screenwriting, so I'm somebody who was discovered by him on a personal level, and not invited on the strength of a pilot, through management, or anything similar.

There's plenty of great info available for new writers entering a room, but what might be expected of someone in my situation to make a good impression? I'm great at being a fly on the wall and absorbing information, but pretty clueless otherwise.

Should I just keep my mouth shut the whole time, or are there ways I can participate without coming off as intrusive or out of line?

Any help from those experienced with this type of situation is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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Old 05-23-2019, 03:49 PM   #2
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

This is crazy cool and we're all jealous.

I would not say anything when everyone is in the room doing the work in a huge group, but after they break off, I'd try to causally make conversation with the writer's assistants and the lower level writers.

But something tells me that the creator will lead the way for you... if they invited you there, they obviously think highly of your writing and maybe it's possibly seeing if he can use you on his staff. That's how it reads to me?

Did you ask him about coming by the writer's room or he offered out of nowhere?
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Old 05-23-2019, 04:03 PM   #3
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

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Originally Posted by GhostWhite View Post
Should I just keep my mouth shut the whole time, or are there ways I can participate without coming off as intrusive or out of line?
Just shut your mouth and listen. Be the best fly on the wall you can. It's not your place or your job to chime in. Even new staff writers will wait a week or two before "chiming in" in a room and they are being paid to be there. There are egos involved so tread very lightly.

Observe. Even takes some notes. Thank the man who invited you at the end of the day. Tell him how great it was to be there and you look forward to being back tomorrow. Then unless he offers up some small talk, hit the road. Do the same thing the next day. Watch out the room works. See the dynamics of who does what. Make a few notes to yourself for the fun of it, in case h asks you any thoughts. But keep it to a minimum. Be respectful to all. And stay humble. (Not that you would't.)

If you haven't already, I'd even say listen the the Writers Panel by Ben Blacker. There are various/numerous episodes where writers talk about being in the room for the first time and how they handled themselves. Might be a nice warm up for you.
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Last edited by Done Deal Pro : 05-23-2019 at 05:12 PM.
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Old 05-23-2019, 05:08 PM   #4
GhostWhite
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

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Did you ask him about coming by the writer's room or he offered out of nowhere?
He put me in a hotel downtown over the weekend for something unrelated to that TV show, and we had dinner on Saturday night. We were talking about his writing process, and he mentioned they were about to start writing the next season of that show. I asked if I could drop in and observe for a day, and he said a week would be better. He also suggested there might be an opportunity for the following season if things went well moving forward. I didn't ask about anything like that, so I almost dropped dead when he said it. But for now I'm just looking forward to seeing how they break down stories.
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Old 05-23-2019, 05:11 PM   #5
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

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Originally Posted by Done Deal Pro View Post
If you haven't already, I'd even say listen the the Writers Panel by Ben Blacker. There are various/numerous episodes where writers talk about being in the room for the first time and how they handled themselves. Might be a nice warm up for you.

This looks great. I'm checking it out now. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 05-23-2019, 05:13 PM   #6
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

You are most welcome. Sounds like a great experience for you. Hope it goes really well.
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Old 05-24-2019, 01:10 PM   #7
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

so jelly jelly here.

props on the opportunity.

go in taking notes. he will lead you when/if he feels it's appropriate for you to participate. i wouldn't be surprised if he even asks you your opinion. pay close attention to everyone in the room. at the first break tell him, in your own way, how you feel about this opportunity to be in the room.

really just follow his lead, take a lot of notes, be the positive force and make sure you try in a natural way to connect with the other writers in the room. and most of all, be respectful, not saying you won't be, but be respectful that all these people in the room want to be there. you showing up might feel a little threatening to someone who might not feel completely secure in their own position. again, not saying that's the case.

good luck and enjoy the **** out of it.

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Old 06-02-2019, 03:41 PM   #8
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

This happened to me before I got my first staffing job. My advice is just listen, the showrunner might actually ask you what you think about a pitch of if you have any ideas. If you do, feel free to pitch. If you don't just mention how much you respond to one of the ideas that's already being considered and state why.

Ask the other writers questions but not during room time. Ask before room time starts or if you're in a room that has an actual lunch break ask questions then.

Most importantly treat this as a learning opportunity for you to grow as a writer and not an opportunity to staff. Also be kind and gracious to everyone down to the writers PA.

Good luck!
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Old 06-04-2019, 01:54 PM   #9
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

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Originally Posted by GhostWhite View Post
He put me in a hotel downtown over the weekend
Huh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostWhite View Post
and we had dinner on Saturday night.
Huh?

like... you're dating?
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Old 06-04-2019, 08:51 PM   #10
GhostWhite
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Default Re: Shadowing a Writers Room

It's a really strange situation. I'll try to explain it the best I can.

So, there are these things called shows, and some types of shows take place in front of a live audience that usually consists of humans. Sometimes the people who produce and/or host these shows have guests, which means there's a possibility they could be coming from out of town. If that's the case, the producers of that show normally pay for the guest to take temporary residence in something called a hotel, which is a building designed to accommodate short-term stays. During his stay, a guest might become hungry and eat, if he wishes to survive for any significant period of time past that point. If the producer in question wants to know more about that person prior to doing an interview in front of a live audience, the possibility exists that the two of them might end up eating together at a restaurant to discuss such things. At that point, the producer has more information about the guest, and can reference those conversations that took place at dinner when he needs material during the show.
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