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Old 12-22-2010, 12:40 AM   #41
prescribe22
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

Your agent is inherently on your side. They only profit if your script sells.

He/she is invested in the script just like you. So, if your agent passes, it means something.

As for this script consultant stuff... if they're charging to review your script, then they're interests are different.

They make money no matter what they say about your script. Their biggest interest is to get you to come back and pay again and/or send more business their way.

You have to rely on their good intentions in order to get an HONEST appraisal. I don't care how good their intentions may be, we all know what the road to hell is paved with.

Your agent has no agenda other than to sell your scripts. Again, if they're passing, it means something.
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Old 12-22-2010, 06:48 AM   #42
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

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Originally Posted by emily blake View Post
Be careful how enthusiastically you take that though. "Send it through your agent" is a standard response companies give to weed out the unprepped writers. I know I've gotten it before.

Not trying to burst your bubble - just saying, don't pin all your faith in these requests unless you're sure they're real requests, because much of the time if a producer REALLY wants to read your script they don't give a crap who sends it.

That said, I don't have a lot of experience with the big studios - just the little guys. Maybe with the big guys it's different.
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Originally Posted by Rantanplan View Post
It's not always easy to tell. I once talked a production company into letting me send the script without a rep, and their response was, OK, but just please make sure to include this whole correspondence so we have proof of how the script came to us.

That made me understand where they're coming from a bit more. I think that if someone is not interested, they'll give you the typical brush-off (well aside from deleting without reading, or reading and not responding). If they say "submit through your rep," I think they might actually be interested, they just need that legal protection. I actually once had someone from Plan B CALL me to tell me I could submit through an entertainment attorney.

I also think it's totally up to the individual. I have a script in at two pretty big production companies right now, one sent a release form, the other didn't. So you never know. Same with big agencies. You can send 50 queries to agents, and maybe you'll get the note from the legal department only once.
One of these people I was talking to wanted to read the script but said I must send it through my agent because within the last year they had someone accuse them of stealing their concept. So I don't want to go against the policies of these companies. It can start things off terribly or ruin these opportunities.

Quote:
Originally Posted by prescribe22 View Post
Your agent is inherently on your side. They only profit if your script sells.

He/she is invested in the script just like you. So, if your agent passes, it means something.

As for this script consultant stuff... if they're charging to review your script, then they're interests are different.

They make money no matter what they say about your script. Their biggest interest is to get you to come back and pay again and/or send more business their way.

You have to rely on their good intentions in order to get an HONEST appraisal. I don't care how good their intentions may be, we all know what the road to hell is paved with.

Your agent has no agenda other than to sell your scripts. Again, if they're passing, it means something.
This is true. He wants the best for me and he's being honest, which is probably rare in this business so I can't just brush it off and move on without him. I'm heading back to the drawing board to rework things. I've already started, but won't have an objective view till I talk further with him.

Thanks for the tips and for sharing your thoughts.
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Old 12-23-2010, 07:20 PM   #43
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

Just a hunch, and I know nothing about this particular situation ... but, perhaps your agent has problems with the execution of the script, something that an e-query would not reveal. So, perhaps the pitch works very well for the script, and your agent wants you to bring the script up to the level of the pitch.

Good luck with it!
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Old 12-23-2010, 07:53 PM   #44
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

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Originally Posted by peasblossom View Post
Just a hunch, and I know nothing about this particular situation ... but, perhaps your agent has problems with the execution of the script, something that an e-query would not reveal. So, perhaps the pitch works very well for the script, and your agent wants you to bring the script up to the level of the pitch.

Good luck with it!
I was just thinking about this today. It's definitely a possibility. I really believe the concept is compelling and very unique, but perhaps certain scenes weren't executed well and the dialogue may need some work. And I'm more than willing to work hard on both weak spots.

Thanks for your thoughts and encouragement!
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Old 12-27-2010, 10:58 PM   #45
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

I can't read thru all these posts but lemme offer this...

It happens to me often. I mostly spec sh!t my reps don't like. In the end, you're screwed and it's time to find alternative avenues while WRITING A NEW SPEC. (for those that remember, Me and Mongo had to put one of these projects on the internet.)

When I spec edge, non-commercial sh!t, I know the odds are my reps won't wanna go wide with it. They're not in that business.

If your reps can't get behind your script, they're not gonna be able to sell it. They're not gonna be able to sell you on the next job.

Get over it and start writing a new spec.
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Old 12-27-2010, 11:01 PM   #46
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

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Originally Posted by BattleDolphinZero View Post
I can't read thru all these posts but lemme offer this...

It happens to me often. I mostly spec sh!t my reps don't like. In the end, you're screwed and it's time to find alternative avenues while WRITING A NEW SPEC. (for those that remember, Me and Mongo had to put one of these projects on the internet.)

When I spec edge, non-commercial sh!t, I know the odds are my reps won't wanna go wide with it. They're not in that business.

If your reps can't get behind your script, they're not gonna be able to sell it. They're not gonna be able to sell you on the next job.

Get over it and start writing a new spec.
So what exactly are you saying? Write what you want and know that you will have to get it out there yourself, or never write what your rep won't take out?
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Old 12-28-2010, 10:49 AM   #47
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

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So what exactly are you saying? Write what you want and know that you will have to get it out there yourself,
Pretty much this.

And I'm also saying people shouldn't expect reps at major agencies to be interested in "difficult" material unless that was an understanding going on... and it's never an understanding going in unless you're a known commodity: Rian Johnson, Paul T Anderson, etc.

When I write stuff with kids being shot in the face, I know there's no "market" for that. I know the only way that spec is gonna get traction is if it one day finds a producer who feels passionate about it. I also know i have my bills paid before I write it because I know what I know which is mostly everything--or at least I know that I"m gonna get limited support from my reps and the town.

Look at the movies hollywood is making. Did you write one of those? Yes? Then there's a good chance you're gonna get traction with that script in some form. Did you write a western? Did you write a ballerina thriller? Did you write about Stephen Dorff living at the Marmont? Then you wrote some sh!t that hollywood only makes for the Coens, Aronofsky, and Coppola.

Can't be mad at the system, can't beat the system, you can only understand it and accept it in your face.
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Old 12-28-2010, 11:01 AM   #48
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

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Originally Posted by BattleDolphinZero View Post

Can't be mad at the system, can't beat the system, you can only understand it and accept it in your face.
This is awesome. If I wasn't feeling so lazy, I'd probably make it my signature.
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Old 12-28-2010, 11:21 AM   #49
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

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Originally Posted by BattleDolphinZero View Post
Pretty much this.

And I'm also saying people shouldn't expect reps at major agencies to be interested in "difficult" material unless that was an understanding going on... and it's never an understanding going in unless you're a known commodity: Rian Johnson, Paul T Anderson, etc.

When I write stuff with kids being shot in the face, I know there's no "market" for that. I know the only way that spec is gonna get traction is if it one day finds a producer who feels passionate about it. I also know i have my bills paid before I write it because I know what I know which is mostly everything--or at least I know that I"m gonna get limited support from my reps and the town.

Look at the movies hollywood is making. Did you write one of those? Yes? Then there's a good chance you're gonna get traction with that script in some form. Did you write a western? Did you write a ballerina thriller? Did you write about Stephen Dorff living at the Marmont? Then you wrote some sh!t that hollywood only makes for the Coens, Aronofsky, and Coppola.

Can't be mad at the system, can't beat the system, you can only understand it and accept it in your face.
I think most of us realize that "difficult material" is not likely to get a whole lot of traction, especially from unknown writers. What interests me in this thread is the decision that writers make to yes or no try to get their passion projects out there on their own if their rep won't. I'm curious as to how much that happens and how it affects the writer / rep relationship.
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Old 12-28-2010, 12:47 PM   #50
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Default Re: When your agent doesn’t like your script…

I'm in similar but different position right now.

I'm a little bothered but, am working on a new spec right now and am almost done with the first draft. And have a another script, bout to be in play so we have distractions. But I totally feel your pain here, it's a difficult position to be in. And you don 't want to go against your agent, but never know who may be right.

John August said something that gives me nightmares. He said his agent didn't believe in GO, and he fired him. Got a new rep and then sold GO. But you have to ask yourself, did John August luck out? Or was he smart to trust and bet on himself, and now we have a happy Hollywood ending? In this climate going the John August route may be tricky. At the same time there comes a point when a writer has to trust and bet on himself.

My old manager said something, "If we could do your job, we would be writers. No one is ever right until the script sells".
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