Click here for Done Deal Pro home page

Done Deal Pro Home Page

Loading

Go Back   Done Deal Pro Forums > Business > Business Questions and Advice
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-06-2019, 03:18 PM   #11
Rantanplan
Member
 
Rantanplan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,528
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bono View Post
East coast baby.
P.S.: Aren't you in NY? There's got to be some HW writing action in NYC, too, no? OR: write a play, get it produced on Broadway, have it sell out for 2 years, boom, problem solved
Rantanplan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-12-2019, 07:13 PM   #12
Vango
User
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 112
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

I think the best job for an aspiring screenwriter is to get a job in professional writing. Copy, ghostwriting, academic writing, journalism. It also helps to absorb as much writing in all contexts as possible -- literature, screenplays, poems, news, slogans. Other good jobs include occupations where you're likely to meet interesting people, or travel to interesting places. If you're wife is great enough to let you be a stay at home dad, that can work too, if you can get some writing done in between handling the minions.
Vango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 03:07 AM   #13
Merrick
User
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 99
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

You can do anything, really. It doesn't matter. I'm the CEO of a company. I think there is a big myth about what you have to do to make it. Write well and don't get discouraged. Those are the only rules in my opinion. Everything else is make it up as you go.
Merrick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 11:24 AM   #14
Done Deal Pro
Administrator
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: West Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 1,584
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

If you are a showrunner or staff writer, you aren't really waiting for any big breaks. You're in. You are getting paid really good money and you are working in a part of the business which has skyrocketed in the last few years to all new levels. Most of the "work" and money is in TV right now. We list more deals for TV than film and it wasn't that way years ago. The people working at that level in TV aren't too worried about film. (Not saying they might not be interested in writing features, but they are fine.)

In terms of a job "before" breaking in, I wouldn't suggest looking at it quite like that. Considering most writers will never break in, find a job that you at least like, that pays you well enough to live and allows for you to write.

Along with the various suggestions above, personally, I would say, depending a bit on the person, find something that doesn't mentally tax you so much that by the time you get home, your brain is too fried to write and your eyes are tired. Find a decent, stable job with reasonable hours so you can write at night or even get up in the morning and write before you go in (at say, 9am). Hopefully the job wouldn't require weekend work, or at least not often. Or too much travel which might prove disruptive. And depending on your own personal likes & dislikes, think about whether a writing "day" job is too much writing already before you start to write for you. Everyone is different, so make the best decision for you, of course.

I love working in production and I'm glad I started out that way. It's great to be a part of the entire process from development to release. Not necessary for a writer to really know, but I think good to know. The hours are long and I only ever got writing done when we were in post or between films.

Quite a few folks out here work as servers and bartenders so they can more easily switch shifts for meetings or auditions; and even get time off for actual film & TV work. Temp gigs, Uber driving, etc. can also work for some in terms of flexibility. (A screenwriter drove us to the airport about eight weeks ago. I'm friends with writer who drives so he can write.) I wouldn't suggest a mindless job, but again something pleasant enough with some freedom and not overloading literally or figuratively. You might be in that job for awhile so make it count at least towards a decent life.

Hope this can help in some fashion and not muddy the waters.
__________________
Will
Done Deal Pro
www.donedealpro.com

Last edited by Done Deal Pro : 10-13-2019 at 12:31 PM.
Done Deal Pro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2019, 08:03 AM   #15
dworhach
User
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 56
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

Although I rarely post personal stuff, I thought I'd share news about a gig that's worked well for me. For the past 20 years, I've been a reservist with FEMA, often deployed to a disaster for 30 days or more, mainly serving as a writer at a field office during the day and staying at a nice hotel at night. (Over the past two years, I've spent 30 days at a Spring Hill Suites in Tallahassee, 30 days at a Fairfield Inn in Omaha, 4 days training at an old army base in Anniston, 30 days at a Residence Inn in Raleigh, and 45 days at a condo on the beach in St. Croix.) While deployed, I've written anything from a news release on how to restore flood-damaged documents, to an op-ed piece for the Washington Post by a federal coordinating officer, to talking points for the Secretary of Homeland Security.

Good pay and perks. Interesting work. Plenty of time to write. Home base can be anywhere in the country. For those interested:
Reservists (On-call)
FEMA consistently seeks talented and hard-working people who are eager to assist disaster survivors and first responders on an on-call basis as Reservist employees. They are the main FEMA workforce during an emergency or disaster.
Reservists travel, receive training, build professional networks and support those in need. The work is available intermittently. Applicants must commit to working on an on-call basis, be available to travel within 24-48 hours, be deployed for 30 or more days and possess a strong work ethic.
How to Apply
Reservists are also hired to a position within a Cadre based on their skills and experience. Cadres are groups of personnel organized by operational function. If interested, please review the cadre options below and see where your skills and interests align.
Applying for a Reservist Position is easy! You can apply to be a Reservist by emailing your resume to fema-careers@fema.dhs.gov and include the reservist "cadre" of interest in the subject line.
External Affairs
The External Affairs (EA) cadre engages and communicates with stakeholders in Congress, the media, state, local, tribal, and local governments, the private sector, and internal FEMA employees. They also serve as advisors to FEMA program and support offices on decision making, development, and maintenance of policies and programs.
If you are interested in a position in the External Affairs cadre, please email your resume to fema-careers@fema.dhs.gov and include "External Affairs" in the subject line.
dworhach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2019, 01:58 PM   #16
Rantanplan
Member
 
Rantanplan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,528
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

Interesting, thank you!
Rantanplan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2019, 03:11 PM   #17
sc111
Member
 
sc111's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 7,321
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vango View Post
I think the best job for an aspiring screenwriter is to get a job in professional writing. Copy, ghostwriting, academic writing, journalism. It also helps to absorb as much writing in all contexts as possible -- literature, screenplays, poems, news, slogans. Other good jobs include occupations where you're likely to meet interesting people, or travel to interesting places. If you're wife is great enough to let you be a stay at home dad, that can work too, if you can get some writing done in between handling the minions.
I've been an advertising copywriter/marketing writer/ghostwriter for more years than I'll cop to.

For me, the downside is, after writing all day for clients, I just want a break from the darn keyboard.

When this is your day job, there is an upside, though.

You're not precious about your writing. You develop a really thick skin. And you also develop the ability to been as objective as a human can be about your own work.

Simply put -- you know when what you've written sucks, doesn't suck and rocks. At the same time, you're detached about it (a la, "Oh, well).
__________________
Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. “Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.”
sc111 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2019, 07:46 PM   #18
DangoForth
Member
 
DangoForth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Secluded Mountain Fortress
Posts: 825
Default Re: Best Jobs While Waiting For The Big Break in Film

I worked 3 days a week as a nerd for a number of years (Three 13 hour days). Allowed me to write a lot. Of course, I had a specialty. But then, the company moved my entire department to India and I had to get a real job. But it was fun while it lasted. Go nerds!
DangoForth is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Done Deal Pro

eXTReMe Tracker