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Old 09-17-2019, 10:36 AM   #31
sc111
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

I don't think 'write what you know' literally means you're limited to storylines about things you've done or experienced.

It applies to characters, back story, locations, etc. It simply gives your work more realism, in my opinion.

With the example of the serial killer, the 'write what you know' could apply to their back story which would be part of their motivation. If the writer had, let's say, military experience, it may be a good idea to have the killer be ex-military to more effectively create the character.

Write what you know would, IMO, also include extensive research. I've seen work that seems to have used other movies as reference rather than research for something fresh.

Just my opine.
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:13 PM   #32
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

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Originally Posted by sc111 View Post
I don't think 'write what you know' literally means you're limited to storylines about things you've done or experienced.

It applies to characters, back story, locations, etc. It simply gives your work more realism, in my opinion.

With the example of the serial killer, the 'write what you know' could apply to their back story which would be part of their motivation. If the writer had, let's say, military experience, it may be a good idea to have the killer be ex-military to more effectively create the character.

Write what you know would, IMO, also include extensive research. I've seen work that seems to have used other movies as reference rather than research for something fresh.

Just my opine.
Yes, that.
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:24 PM   #33
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

I think we’re all agreeing.
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:29 PM   #34
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

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I think we’re all agreeing.
That's just not right!
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Old 09-17-2019, 01:33 PM   #35
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

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Yes, that.
I'm still a bit foggy on what you by writing "beyond myself." It sound interesting as I think I understand it but I don't want to assume I know what you mean.
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Old 09-17-2019, 03:40 PM   #36
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

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I'm still a bit foggy on what you by writing "beyond myself." It sound interesting as I think I understand it but I don't want to assume I know what you mean.
I'm thinking why limit ourselves. We should experiment with writing about things we don't already know. We should try to express emotions we haven't expressed. We should try to create characters we haven't seen. Even experiment with voice. Things like that.

I don't know if I am making what I mean less foggy. How do you interpret "writing beyond yourself?"
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Old 09-17-2019, 03:42 PM   #37
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

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That's just not right!

So boring if we all agreed.
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Old 09-17-2019, 04:34 PM   #38
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

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I'm thinking why limit ourselves. We should experiment with writing about things we don't already know. We should try to express emotions we haven't expressed. We should try to create characters we haven't seen. Even experiment with voice. Things like that.

I don't know if I am making what I mean less foggy. How do you interpret "writing beyond yourself?"
Per the BF: I was thinking of digging deeper within oneself. I have no problem with, as you say, "experimenting with writing about things we don't already know." However, we still tell our stories through characters. And characters are motivated (or inhibited) by certain aspects of human nature. And, IMO, our understanding of human nature begins with understanding ourselves a la "Know thyself." And that takes willingness to dig deeper into parts of our psyche we may not be ready to look at.

Example: My one script that came closest to "close but no cigar" was a female buddy roadtrip comedy. The premise was a career woman, who had issues with her dad, is faced with his sudden death, compounded by finding at the reading of his will that she had a half-sister she knew nothing about.

Now, my own Dad died young so I had that in common with my protags but that was where the similarities ended. The Dad in my script was nothing like my Dad. I have no sisters, no secret half sibs. I was struggling with writing the co-leads. They didn't feel genuine to me and I was writing them.

So I sat with that a while and realized that many people, including myself, who lose a parent unexpectedly and relatively young, vacillate between idealizing the parent and anger at the parent about things they were unable to resolve with them before the sudden death.

So I went back and wrote each of the sisters from each perspective: one idealizing the Dad seeing only his positive traits, the other seeing only his negative traits and angry at him. That required me to do some digging within, face some stuff I hadn't looked at in a while.

Here's the weird part -- I personally think I was too influenced by my rep at the time on the plot points. I'm not crazy about the script. However, I think it got the wee bit of momentary traction it did get because of the emotional "write what you know" route I took with the lead characters. It resonated even though I know the script had other weaknesses.

Anyway -- that's what I was thinking may also fall under the topic of write what you know.
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Old 09-17-2019, 05:14 PM   #39
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

some reason i thought you were talking about SUBTEXT in writing and was think about a foot massage and what it really means to give a good foot massage

does it mean you're into feet, like sexually or just that you give pleasure to someone else or just a foot massage ... truth is, nobody knows why Marcellus threw Tony out of that four story window except Marcellus and Tony. When you little scamps get together, you're worse than a sewing circle.
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Old 09-17-2019, 05:48 PM   #40
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Default Re: Bring yourself to your scripts

I'm not understanding the confusion. Writers observe the world around them and the people in it and draw from that to create their own worlds and characters, whether closer in nature to their personal world and experiences or completely new and foreign. But either way, it involves imagination, an understanding of human nature and skill with the craft. And just because you're writing something closer to home doesn't make it easier. You still have to distill it and make it transcend your own personal experience in such a way that it resonates with a large audience. For some people it's actually easier to write about killer androids in a different galaxy.
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