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Old 01-31-2014, 01:17 PM   #651
michaelb
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

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Originally Posted by Bods View Post
Hey Michael,

If you have the time: I have been told that if you are an aspiring writer, you shouldn't even bother writing original pilots, since tv is more exclusive, and as an unknown you really have zero chance to break into tv unless you climb the tv ladder, etc...

I get that TV is more about the pitch, but I feel like, especially on the drama side, it at least happens -- if it's a great idea with a great execution, it's at least possible to attract some attention.

Do you consider/look at original pilot scripts -- or from your POV is the attitude more, it's not worth your time unless the writer's already on a show on the verge of getting staffed...?

Thanks in advance.
As a young writer, you have to write original pilots. That's how your foot in the business. Original spec pilots from new writers sell every season.

Best,

MB
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Old 03-26-2014, 06:44 PM   #652
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

Hey Michael!

Cold query question. Logline and summary or logline only? Also, if a producer, director or screenwriter read your script and liked it do you care?

Lastly, I got a read at CAA as a favor from someone. It got a consider. Does that hold any value?

Thanks!
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Old 04-07-2014, 02:37 PM   #653
michaelb
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

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Originally Posted by RayRayRay View Post
Hey Michael!

Cold query question. Logline and summary or logline only? Also, if a producer, director or screenwriter read your script and liked it do you care?

Lastly, I got a read at CAA as a favor from someone. It got a consider. Does that hold any value?

Thanks!
Logline only for me (usually). Far too often writers will say "such and such IMDB producer likes my script". The reality is that they are most often siting someone that is wayyy off the grid and doesn't mean anything/move the needle for anyone.

I will say that as the black list website has become what it has, a link to the scripts page if it received a good rating makes it very easy for me to just go read the review and get the script myself.

That being said, you still need a great logline/pitch on the story.

Best,

MB
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Old 06-02-2014, 06:38 AM   #654
london89
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

Hi Michael,


Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions.


I'm about to start a new script, currently agonising over concepts. The only story I'm really itching to write is quite ambitious. Is it a complete waste of time for an amateur trying to break in to write a big budget high concept sci-fi /action spec???

I really don't want to waste my time only to be shot down in flames in six months time because (amongst other things) my story is simply too expensive to produce.

But then Pacific Rim was a spec script wasn't it?! Hmm...

Or, how about leveraging it as a calling card???


Arghhhh!!!


Thanks in advance
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Old 06-10-2014, 12:29 PM   #655
michaelb
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

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Originally Posted by london89 View Post
Hi Michael,


Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions.


I'm about to start a new script, currently agonising over concepts. The only story I'm really itching to write is quite ambitious. Is it a complete waste of time for an amateur trying to break in to write a big budget high concept sci-fi /action spec???

I really don't want to waste my time only to be shot down in flames in six months time because (amongst other things) my story is simply too expensive to produce.

But then Pacific Rim was a spec script wasn't it?! Hmm...

Or, how about leveraging it as a calling card???


Arghhhh!!!


Thanks in advance
Not at all. More important than cost is you hitting it out of the park in the execution of the script.

Best,

MB
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Old 06-11-2014, 12:19 PM   #656
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

Thank you!
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Old 06-14-2014, 11:07 AM   #657
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

Want to go bowling sometime?
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Old 06-23-2014, 10:25 AM   #658
EJ Pennypacker
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

Hi Michael,

Thanks once again for taking the time to answer questions here.

I'll keep this short. If a new writer was trying to break in the industry, would you advise that person to concentrate on TV rather than a film spec? Is it worth now doing an original pilot versus a feature spec?

It seems like there's an element of "Gold rush" in TV right now. Is this something you agree with?

EJ
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Old 07-15-2014, 03:41 PM   #659
michaelb
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

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Originally Posted by EJ Pennypacker View Post
Hi Michael,

Thanks once again for taking the time to answer questions here.

I'll keep this short. If a new writer was trying to break in the industry, would you advise that person to concentrate on TV rather than a film spec? Is it worth now doing an original pilot versus a feature spec?

It seems like there's an element of "Gold rush" in TV right now. Is this something you agree with?

EJ
Honestly, both are tremendously hard. And TV is harder than it ever has been with established feature writers going there to create, or even just work.

It's not about writing for film or TV, it's about coming up with the best story you can, and executing it very well.

So, if your great idea is in film, write a feature. If it's a TV show, write a pilot.

Good luck!

Best,

MB
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Old 07-15-2014, 06:51 PM   #660
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Default Re: Question for Michaelb (clients productivity)

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Originally Posted by Bob Smargiassi View Post
Hitching myself to an idea and taking those first few steps of the marathon is my biggest weakness. In any given year I waste months workshopping ideas that never come together.

I need a Robotard 8000.
Oh, you too? LOL.
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