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Old 06-20-2020, 07:24 PM   #11
finalact4
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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How much did the previous Imagine Impact winners who received deals get?

The previous program sounded like you had a lot more opportunity to network and build relationships.
Not only that, your work was going to a lot of different executives to consider. That's why there was a 4-way bidding war for TUNGA, which Netflix ultimately won. It seems that's what they're trying to avoid this time. That's a fair market value based on industry demand.

This opportunity is going to ONE PLACE with a preset fee for your services, and little or no negotiations. I still am not certain about the last part-- can anyone chime in on the language? I might have to just ask them outright if that is the only fee or is there an opportunity to negotiate a purchase price for the the IP you are selling. It's not like it's an assignment where they GIVE you the story. This is your hard earned IP.
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Old 06-20-2020, 08:11 PM   #12
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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Not only that, your work was going to a lot of different executives to consider. That's why there was a 4-way bidding war for TUNGA, which Netflix ultimately won. It seems that's what they're trying to avoid this time. That's a fair market value based on industry demand.

This opportunity is going to ONE PLACE with a preset fee for your services, and little or no negotiations. I still am not certain about the last part-- can anyone chime in on the language? I might have to just ask them outright if that is the only fee or is there an opportunity to negotiate a purchase price for the the IP you are selling. It's not like it's an assignment where they GIVE you the story. This is your hard earned IP.

It sounds closer to the way Amazon had it set up a while back. That's assuming the budget is over 5 million. If not, it's closer to 70 grand...not sure how much after taxes. I guess it's ok if the project doesn't go anywhere or is not widely viewed. But, then again if it turns out to be the Lion King, the writer would feel pretty stupid. Most likely, it won't. The original impact attendees seem a lot more lucky. They got to go the plush Imagine offices, get catered food and mingle with the whos who of writing and directing.
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Old 06-21-2020, 02:00 AM   #13
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

I can only chime in about what I understand the language to mean. You will be paid the WGA minimum for the writing portion of the work (story, screenplay, one round of revisions, name credit, etc.). You will not be paid anything else for writing it.

The other general terms are under Netflix's standard contract - probably things like term (time), territory, usage, ownership, etc.

This blurb doesn't mention anything if you manage to become attached as director, producer, etc. I suppose you negotiate a separate fee.

So - to summarize, and only looking at this one clause - if you enter, you are bound to agree to the WGA minimum payment for all writing for your story and screenplay.

It does leave out a looooot of info though like. What if they ask you to do a second round of revisions? More money? Or same fee? Do they own your IP and can make spinoffs, sequels, etc. without you attached?

This, amongst loads of other missing clauses in this "agreement," is why I wouldn't pre-negotiate my sales price by submitting to something that locks you into terms from the get go.

I know writers are hungry, but let's not be desperate. My two cents.

* Not a lawyer, just commenting informally on what I understand the clause (and its implications) to mean.
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Old 06-21-2020, 11:00 AM   #14
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

Ask yourself this? If you sell a spec via a manager or agent -- what do you think you'll get paid? I bet the numbers are close to minimum for first time writer unless there's a bidding war -- which is rare.

What is the value in getting a movie made? I'd be a whole lot more interested if my name was on the finished movie vs the amount of money I got.

My first impression is it was like Project Greenlight -- not designed to get the writer rich -- but to give them a career. It works out well for the writers of FEAST who are top horror writers now.

So that's my quick understand of the opportunity. Pay writer little to get a movie made from their script. Or at least to develop movie with Netflix and have a chance at that right?

For the PR side -- they want to sell that they help out a newbie writer -- so I think that's a good thing for writer getting credit.

Someone mentioned video -- they want to pick a good script and someone that will look good on a red carpet and in PR photos in a magazine.

I mean you got to realize it's not about helping writers. It's about helping the company. It always is. But if a writer gets a career out of it -- awesome.

I see this as I would see the Disney Fellowship or other programs -- you are 100% underpaid for your work -- but the opportunity is huge to help you break out of the pack.

Is that not what this is?
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Old 06-21-2020, 11:25 AM   #15
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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Ask yourself this? If you sell a spec via a manager or agent -- what do you think you'll get paid? I bet the numbers are close to minimum for first time writer unless there's a bidding war -- which is rare.
This is true.

I think the pushback and confusion is that the category they are asking for is "Large scale family action-adventure" along the lines of Pirates of the Caribbean.

Pirates of the Caribbean made 654,264,015 million dollars worldwide. So, over half a billion dollars, and it spawned 4 sequels.

Fair market value doesn't sound like it should be "scale" in this regard. And will the original writer get money if sequels get made as is the norm for successful movies in a category like this?
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Old 06-21-2020, 12:52 PM   #16
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

Oh yeah, and I'm sure the WGA minimum is very respectable for a first timer.

The problem comes with being forced into blanket contracts. If you sell it independently of this kind of agreement, you would have a lawyer involved who'd heavily go over the terms. I don't know with this one whether you are essentially signing a deal memo by entering and having the lesser hand when it comes to all the terms involved. "Standard terms" would be the point from which negotiations begin. There are a ton of important points outside of just how much you get paid.

And let's not forget that it's also possible that you win, are paid, locked into the agreement, and never produced. That wouldn't be beneficial. Is it an option? Will the rights come back to you if it goes into turnaround?

I just wouldn't be comfortable entering a deal without a discussion.
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Old 06-21-2020, 06:42 PM   #17
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

Truth is, all these contests are not going to be great for first time writers. But Hollywood in general is not going to be great for first time writers. Hell any writers. It's all bad. Few writers make real money. Most of us don't make any money.

So what I'm trying to say is worrying about -- what happens if I win and the movie is a hit -- seems like a waste of time.

Enter or don't -- know that if the movie makes 45 Billion dollars you make $45,000 regardless.

So if you have your new hot spec I'd hold onto it and look for a rep. But maybe send in an older spec that is sitting on the shelf and take a shot?
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Old 06-21-2020, 08:29 PM   #18
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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Ask yourself this? If you sell a spec via a manager or agent -- what do you think you'll get paid? I bet the numbers are close to minimum for first time writer unless there's a bidding war -- which is rare.
I'm not debating what a first script might sell for. I'm talking about the value of a large-scale IP.

Quote:
What is the value in getting a movie made? I'd be a whole lot more interested if my name was on the finished movie vs the amount of money I got.
There's no guarantee your name will be on it, there's no guarantee that it will ever get made. This isn't about the short game, it's about the long game. I have other scripts I can hopefully break in with.

Quote:
My first impression is it was like Project Greenlight -- not designed to get the writer rich -- but to give them a career. It works out well for the writers of FEAST who are top horror writers now.
This isn't a $300,000 budget horror film. It's probably a $50-$100 million project.

Quote:
So that's my quick understand of the opportunity. Pay writer little to get a movie made from their script. Or at least to develop movie with Netflix and have a chance at that right?
I'm not debating the opportunity. I posted this thread to understand the language of the contract and guideline contract that you MUST SIGN before they will even consider your project.

This specific call isn't for $5 million budget comedy or horror spec. It's for large-scale action adventure.

If they select you and you do the two rewrites there is NO GUARANTEE that they will make it at all. That is stipulated up front clearly, then Netflix will own it and you might well have given up the IP for two steps at scale. They can shelve it, kick you off the project, or put it in a library for another day.

So, for me, and this specific IP, if I can't negotiate an option/purchase price in addition to the two step deal, then it's not worth it to me and I'll wait for the next genre session to be announced.

Quote:
For the PR side -- they want to sell that they help out a newbie writer -- so I think that's a good thing for writer getting credit.
I understand the PR angle. It isn't just about the writer. It's about Imagine Impact's ability to pre-source large-scale IPs for Netflix. It's about getting a jump on the market and securing their own IPs, exploiting them, and not having to pay someone else a royalty, but to be the receiver of royalties and possibly theatrical revenue. The application asks you outright if anyone has been exposed to producers/buyers/talent including contests.

Quote:
Someone mentioned video -- they want to pick a good script and someone that will look good on a red carpet and in PR photos in a magazine.
No they don't. More likely they're judging whether they believe you can deliver on what they are promising Netflix, how likely you will do in their accelerator program and whether people will WANT to work with you.

Quote:
I mean you got to realize it's not about helping writers. It's about helping the company. It always is. But if a writer gets a career out of it -- awesome.
No one is disputing that.

Quote:
I see this as I would see the Disney Fellowship or other programs -- you are 100% underpaid for your work -- but the opportunity is huge to help you break out of the pack.

Is that not what this is?
I wouldn't submit this specific IP to a fellowship for all the same reasons. They have other opportunities with different genres which will most likely be more reasonably budgeted films.

I think, for me, taking a shot on another script would be a better option. I don't want to give up the novel rights this IP.

I'm not disputing how lovely it would be to get a film made. But giving someone a large-scale franchise so they can make a half a billion dollars and the writer receives scale isn't a fair or equitable deal to any writer.

It doesn't seem by their schedule that you, the writer, are even given the opportunity to build a relationship with the buyers because Imagine Impact does the pitch. The writer is not allowed in the room during the pitch. At that point they(II) are the winners and you, the new writer, are just a name on a piece of paper.

How fast after you deliver the last draft do you think Netflix will fire you and hire a writer they DO have a relationship with? The premise of Imagine Impact was to help a writer who hasn't yet broken in, get their chance to break into the industry.

In this new scenario, you are giving Netflix exclusivity for scale. Exclusivity is supposed to be a two-way street, you pay for that exclusivity. You are ONLY pitching to one customer. It's not the same as your manager taking your spec out wide. That would generate fair market value, but they have is a first look deal with II, who has proven their Accelerator Program, on all the projects Imagine Impact sources.

The Disciple Program was sold by a first time new writer and he got a mid-six deal for that spec. He didn't get scale for it, and that movie still hasn't gone into production and he sold it in 2012. It's been 8 years. THAT would be a perfect movie for Netflix, except it's still owned by Universal. I know those were different times and it was a long time ago. It's just an example.

Last February, Tunga was out of Imagine Impact's Accelerator Program and entered into a four-day bidding war, which Netflix won for a guaranteed mid-six figure. Which sounds like he gets paid even if they DON"T make it. That sale might be what is driving these new rules. I don't know.

If you have a high concept, commercial project and it's a franchise piece that has potential for TV, Film, Novels, merchandising, GN and gaming, it's worth more than only two mins at scale to me.

The MBA WGA 13.A.1.a has a provision "C" that has a fee for delivery of first draft and final draft that excludes the option/purchase price.

C. Original Screenplay, Excluding
Treatment or Sale/Purchase of
Original Screenplay
........................51,290 ................104,996
Installments for Employment:
Delivery of First Draft
Screenplay .........................................39,611 ...................76,373
Delivery of Final Draft
Screenplay .........................................11,679 ....................28,623

I want to understand the language of the contract and the guidelines, both of which you have to sign before they will consider you. I'm trying to make the right decision based on my personal goals.

There's a big disclaimer that states in all caps: THIS IS A LEGAL DOCUMENT THAT REQUIRES YOU TO GIVE UP CERTAIN RIGHTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PROGRAM... so yeah, that was like a big WTF.

Apologies if I've been repetitive, everyone.
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Last edited by finalact4 : 06-21-2020 at 08:50 PM.
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Old 06-21-2020, 08:51 PM   #19
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

Are we not saying the same thing overall?

It's risky -- so "maybe" enter a spec you don't think is the next franchise but a good movie that may otherwise go unnoticed and thus help your career?

But overall -- for most of us -- it's better NOT to enter and just query reps where if we get signed and they go out with it and it sells we have more control and probably make more money.

In general, we don't know what any writer gets paid. "A mid six figure deal" means 500K to our eyes, but I bet the reality would be closer to 150K for the script and 350K production bonus if it gets made. I need a pro to answer that question -- but sadly we chased most of them away. I'm just saying...

google says -- For a LOW budget film which is budgeted at less than $5 million, the script must be purchased for $71,236. For a HIGH budget film which is budgeted at $5 million or more, the script must be purchased for $133,739

So I'm just saying... it's not a perfect science.
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Old 06-22-2020, 07:19 AM   #20
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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More likely they're judging whether they believe you can deliver on what they are promising Netflix, how likely you will do in their accelerator program and whether people will WANT to work with you.
With all the upheaval of these times, I think the video is just reassurance that you don't have a Nazi tattoo on your forehead or are flashing a white power sign. Do you look like an everyday, normal writer? Or are you posing with a AR-15 while wearing a confederate flag T-shirt and swigging a beer?

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Originally Posted by finalact4 View Post
Imagine Impact does the pitch. The writer is not allowed in the room during the pitch.
My introvert self sees this as a huge win. The script will have to speak for itself anyway. And Impact would know what things to emphasize.

And don't you think this is because of the pandemic, anyway? Social distancing. Who in their right mind would want to risk the contained germy air of a plane ride to travel there just for a pitch?
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