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Old 06-22-2020, 10:19 PM   #31
TigerFang
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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Originally Posted by Bono View Post
A 30-second video of you pitching yourself and your project

Yes. The aim of the video is for you pitch yourself and your project in :30 seconds or less. It as akin to an "elevator pitch" and is an opportunity for you to demonstrate your voice as a writer and ability to communicate your ideas. The best of writers are not only concise and compelling in their written work, but their voice and writing skills translate translates to their ability to convey themselves and their idea verbally, as well.

I see that and it seems pretty clear to me. Did I miss something? What is the confusion then?
If they put the FAQ remarks about the video under the “Sample & Video” section, there would be no confusion regarding the video’s topic. As it is, they have the video submission remarks under the “Sample & Video” section, so the video there seems to be related to the sample you might submit.

IMO, they could make it simple and ask you to submit the full screenplay of the project you want to submit rather than imply you can send a “sample” of something else such as a TV pilot or feature (see below).

Here’s the wording on the form asking for the sample: “Please upload a completed pilot or feature screenplay that best represents your ability to execute the project you're submitting. This can be a draft of the project you're submitting but it does not need to be.

Here is where the video confusion arises: On the submission form under the “Sample & Video” heading section, they ask for a file upload of your sample, the title of the sample, the logline of the sample, and then the next line states: “Please upload a 30-second video telling us why this world and story need to be made into a movie.” Here, the instructions for the 30-second video seem to be related to the sample, a sample which, in their own words, “... can be a draft of the project you're submitting but it does not need to be.” Yet there’s nowhere else to upload your full screenplay (as per the FAQs) except in the “Sample & Video” section.

Then, in the FAQs, there’s this: “What if the script I want to submit isn’t completed?
A finished written work is required to submit, as we want to evaluate your ability to execute a story from start to finish. Please either complete the script that is in progress before submitting or submit a different script.

Of course I’m going to submit a completed screenplay, but are they referring to the script that I’m using as a sample or are they referring to the script for the project or idea I’m pitching?

For the submission form, which is it? A sample? Or my screenplay? Or am I to discuss my project idea throughout the form and (possibly) submit a sample different from that project but a sample that demonstrates the ability to execute the project idea’s story?

If you don’t read the FAQs and simply fill out the form, you might miss their intention, which IMO is not clearly stated on the form. It’s a matter of how one interprets the wording, which to me seems vague in places. That is all. These discussions reveal (by sorting through the FAQs) more precisely what they expect in the video and as a submission.

Naturally, the thing to do is to submit the completed screenplay for the project idea you want to pitch along with the 30-second (or less; do them a favor) video of that same project idea.
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Last edited by TigerFang : 06-22-2020 at 10:41 PM.
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Old 06-22-2020, 11:37 PM   #32
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

Anyone want to guess what the other three genres will be?

My guess is:
Comedy
Horror
Sci Fi

Also anyone know if it could be either film or tv?
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Old 06-23-2020, 01:20 AM   #33
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

Yeah, the confusion to the video comes from the different sections that give slightly different directions. The original Impact program from last year had a much clearer easy to understand question for the 30 second video. They just asked you to answer one very specific question in your video. It wasn't as open ended as this time around. What do they want to know about you? Your background? Under Samples & Video, it seems to be more about why this needs to be made. Maybe, those that actually applied the last time would have experience of having to come up with an answer to the video. I love answering written questions, but that video looks daunting. Especially since we have less locations to film it because of this pandemic.
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Old 06-23-2020, 06:34 AM   #34
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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I love answering written questions, but that video looks daunting. Especially since we have less locations to film it because of this pandemic.
Video submission advice from an old pro using “The MacGyver Method”:

Hang up a sheet behind you, put a lamp behind it (watch that you don’t start a fire!), illuminate it from both sides with more lamps in front of you to the left and right at eye-level or above, and make the video at home. You can set up your cell phone or have someone else who’s as quiet as a cat be the cell-phone camera operator (no sniffles or coughs or clearing of the throat).

Shoot your video submission vertically or horizontally if you want; the same standards apply to each. Horizontally is the most likely way they will view it (like YouTube cell-phone videos), even though vertical is the best look in a cell phone video or in a photograph for a one-person composition. On the cell phone, your presence will fill more of the frame vertically, but this is lost if and when the video is viewed horizontally.

Use the “Rule of Thirds.” Compose the shot so it’s your head and shoulders down to where shirt pockets would be (both girls and boys), and practice your pitch. Ensure the head doesn’t go out of frame, nor let it become dead-centered in the frame. Keep the subject’s eyes (yours) on the imaginary line defining the upper third portion of the vertical or horizontal screen.

You could also be daringly creative and do this while walking in a place of your choosing, either using a selfie-stick or, again, having someone record you (better). Use the same composition standards; in these situations, no one really cares about you from the waist down.

Then time yourself on your pitch. Get it down pat. Keep your eyes on that lens because that’s where the people are to whom you’re speaking.

Record indoors in the middle of the night when city and household sounds are at their absolute minimum to prevent distracting audio from ruining your words. Turn off air-conditioners and fans for a minute. Record outdoors where there are no automobiles whizzing past, only birds singing. Wherever you record your pitch, capture at least one good take with good energy. Review your takes (always), choose one, and send it in.

(Back in the early ’90s while in the U.S. Navy, I was given an assignment that required a night-vision camera. There was no time to wait for CINCPACFLT command to mail me one. Instead, I made a night-vision video camera to record the special operations by strapping a pair of ANVS-7 night-vision goggles to a small wooden board along with a Sony Hi-8 video camera with each of their lens “nodes” touching; the rear objective of the night-vision goggles touched the front element of the camera lens at the apex of each lens, or “node,” which is the point where images are transmitted to a camera, whether captured on film, videotape, or digitally. The rig looked odd, but it worked like a charm.)
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Last edited by TigerFang : 06-23-2020 at 07:16 AM.
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Old 06-23-2020, 08:02 AM   #35
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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Originally Posted by TigerFang View Post
Video submission advice from an old pro using “The MacGyver Method”:

Hang up a sheet behind you, put a lamp behind it (watch that you don’t start a fire!), illuminate it from both sides with more lamps in front of you to the left and right at eye-level or above, and make the video at home. You can set up your cell phone or have someone else who’s as quiet as a cat be the cell-phone camera operator (no sniffles or coughs or clearing of the throat).

Shoot your video submission vertically or horizontally if you want; the same standards apply to each. Horizontally is the most likely way they will view it (like YouTube cell-phone videos), even though vertical is the best look in a cell phone video or in a photograph for a one-person composition. On the cell phone, your presence will fill more of the frame vertically, but this is lost if and when the video is viewed horizontally.

Use the “Rule of Thirds.” Compose the shot so it’s your head and shoulders down to where shirt pockets would be (both girls and boys), and practice your pitch. Ensure the head doesn’t go out of frame, nor let it become dead-centered in the frame. Keep the subject’s eyes (yours) on the imaginary line defining the upper third portion of the vertical or horizontal screen.

You could also be daringly creative and do this while walking in a place of your choosing, either using a selfie-stick or, again, having someone record you (better). Use the same composition standards; in these situations, no one really cares about you from the waist down.

Then time yourself on your pitch. Get it down pat. Keep your eyes on that lens because that’s where the people are to whom you’re speaking.

Record indoors in the middle of the night when city and household sounds are at their absolute minimum to prevent distracting audio from ruining your words. Turn off air-conditioners and fans for a minute. Record outdoors where there are no automobiles whizzing past, only birds singing. Wherever you record your pitch, capture at least one good take with good energy. Review your takes (always), choose one, and send it in.

(Back in the early ’90s while in the U.S. Navy, I was given an assignment that required a night-vision camera. There was no time to wait for CINCPACFLT command to mail me one. Instead, I made a night-vision video camera to record the special operations by strapping a pair of ANVS-7 night-vision goggles to a small wooden board along with a Sony Hi-8 video camera with each of their lens “nodes” touching; the rear objective of the night-vision goggles touched the front element of the camera lens at the apex of each lens, or “node,” which is the point where images are transmitted to a camera, whether captured on film, videotape, or digitally. The rig looked odd, but it worked like a charm.)
thanks
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Old 06-24-2020, 02:19 AM   #36
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

It may seem lopsided for the writer to receive the WGA minimum of $50,000 to $100,000 for a potential film with a budget of $75 to $100,000,000, but there are certain risks and benefits for both writers and Netflix:

1. The writer is unproven, so Netflix may end up just paying for the concept and would have to pay a professional writer $500,000 to execute the screenplay.

2. There’s no guarantee that this new adventure (working with unproven writers) would be fruitful for Netflix, where they’ll end up with a product to sell to an audience.

3. Imagine producers are submitting more than one script and writer to Netflix, so with paying only the WGA minimum Netflix can take the financial risk to select more than one script and writer to put into development, which increases the odds not only for Netflix to be successful, but also for a writer to be selected.

Maybe there’s a bonus included in the contract for where the script is produced and the writer receives a credit.

Anyway, if not, heed this: for a new writer to break into the industry it’s very, very, very difficult, so whenever an opportunity presents itself, a writer must seize it.

A writer thinking he could send his script out to agents and producers (which is difficult even to get read requests) and get a couple of hundred thousand more dollars for it is definitely a long shot and not worth it considering there’s an opportunity of having a powerful production company like Imagine Entertainment behind you and having an opportunity to develop a relationship with a powerful company like Netflix.

This Imagine x Netflix is open to professional writers also, so for them, where they have agents and were receiving $300,000 to $500,000 for their scripts, submitting a script may not be right for them.

I entered the first Imagine Impact and I didn’t enter the one’s that came after, nor did I intend to enter again because it seemed like they were looking for specific scripts that would have an impact on society and culture, and also to the fact that in order to protect their investment of $40,000 to the selected writers, the majority of the writers that were selected had industry experience.

The Imagine x Netflix is different because they’re looking for straight commercial potential and if it’s there and the writer’s sample demonstrates that he can craft a screenplay, then there’s an opportunity.

On June 18, I, along with all the other writers on Imagine’s mailing list, received an e-mail about Imagine x Netflix and how they are looking for action-adventure screenplays.

I thought what perfect timing because I just finished the rewrites for my action adventure (AMERICAN SLAVES), but when I went to their site to look into it, they indicated that they were looking for fun, family type scripts that were in the vein of “Night at the Museum,” “Pirates of the Caribbean,” etc.

AMERICAN SLAVES is too dark for this, but I have an action adventure comedy in my drawer, titled SUPER SKUNK. I can use AMERICAN SLAVES as the writing sample to demonstrate I can execute an action adventure.

Even though the SUPER SKUNK screenplay advanced to quarterfinal and semifinalist in mid size screenplay competitions, I need to do a page one rewrite (where if selected they give ten weeks to accomplish). It was my second screenplay and I’ve improved as a writer since then.

I know there are members who hate low-brow, juvenile humor, but there is an audience out there for this type of material.

Howard Stern’s radio “Fartman” and his MTV Music Awards’ appearance was well liked by an audience. In the movie “Mystery Men,” whenever Paul Reubens’ character, Spleen (same power as Fartman) appeared on the screen the audience loved him.

If Netflix has a large under 25 audience, then SUPER SKUNK would be a good fit for them.
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Old 06-24-2020, 04:25 PM   #37
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

In the online submission form, Imagine Impact asks me for my age and how I would describe my gender identity. Is this for inclusion or exclusion purposes, or both? How do either of these things matter for a script submission?
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Old 06-24-2020, 05:13 PM   #38
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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Originally Posted by Anagram View Post

Also anyone know if it could be either film or tv?
The category for this entry is for a large-scale family action-adventure, and they're using Pirates of the Caribbean and Night at the Museum as examples, so I'd say feature.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerFang View Post
In the online submission form, Imagine Impact asks me for my age and how I would describe my gender identity. Is this for inclusion or exclusion purposes, or both? How do either of these things matter for a script submission?
Those sections are optional, and I believe it says its for their own purposes to see who's applying and has no effect on submission.
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Old 06-24-2020, 05:36 PM   #39
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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has no effect on submission.
This is what they say, but they're human.

I believe, in this case, the commercial potential of the material takes priority, but I do believe other variables, i.e., race, age, gender, etc. do carry some weight, but how strongly this will come into play, I don't know.

Yes, the personal questions are optional, I believe this is only because of legal reasons, so you can avoid answering these questions, but remember, they require a 30 second video.

They are gonna see if your young or old, male or female, fit and handsome or obese and hideous, white, black, Hispanic, etc.
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Old 06-24-2020, 08:53 PM   #40
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Default Re: Imagine Impact X Netflix

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In the online submission form, Imagine Impact asks me for my age and how I would describe my gender identity. Is this for inclusion or exclusion purposes, or both? How do either of these things matter for a script submission?
It shouldn’t matter .

And the questions shouldn’t be asked, imo. I don’t care what they say is the reason for it.

They say that they’re looking for diverse candidates that have overcome some challenging time in their life. In the past they’ve used AI and keywords.

If I entered I would leave them blank. Which might very well disqualify you.

If they want true demographic information to better understand submissions they could have you submit the information anonymously— not attached to your name, application, and your script.
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