Click here for Done Deal Pro home page

Done Deal Pro Home Page

Loading

Go Back   Done Deal Pro Forums > Business > Business Questions and Advice
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-21-2011, 12:34 AM   #51
Laura Reyna
Member
 
Laura Reyna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: California coast
Posts: 1,782
Default Re: How risky is this move?

I don't think anyone is against the idea of bringing various ideas to reps, or discussing ideas with reps in order to decide which ones will work as specs (or whatever). I think we all understand that kind of back and forth is a given.

Where I have concerns is bringing in a lot of undeveloped ideas to reps simply for the sake of bringing something in to them to look at. I would rather take a bit more time and bring them ideas that I truly believed were good and had potential-- stuff I had thought about & was excited about writing.

I guess this is a situation where you would make your preference in doing things known to your reps and go from there.

Thanks.
__________________

"Trust your stuff." -- Dave Righetti, Pitching Coach

( Formerly "stvnlra" )
Laura Reyna is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 12:40 AM   #52
Ronaldinho
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 2,288
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelb View Post
3. Maybe naive for you. Sorry, but I work in the business at a high level. I represent great creative writers and directors. I know many writers that write 5 ideas down per day, let alone 10 per week. If you can't think of 10 ideas (good or bad) per week, you're probably not working in the same level of Hollywood that I am. And even if you are "diving into the script", almost all writers are able to multi-task. To survive in Hollywood, you have to.
All I'm saying is that I've never had a discussion with a working writer - and I am one, and know a lot of 'em - about a long period of looking for an idea to please an agent or manager that was discussed with any sort of "that's a process I think was worthwhile and would be happy to go through again."

Now, maybe you represent all the people who had a great time going through that process, and somehow my social circle doesn't overlap with any of them. But you're talking about people in the business at a high level, and I'm talking about working writers repped at CAA, Gersh, and WME ... so, yeah, I think we're talking about rep working at a "high level" and writers doing the same.

You saying "quirky little movie" wasn't a figure of speech, by the way, it was being condescending and actually obscuring the real issue by attacking a straw-man version of my position.
Ronaldinho is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 12:43 AM   #53
Ronaldinho
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 2,288
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelb View Post
(I'm working on Hollywood, most here are not).
Most - not all.

Please be careful about your assumptions.
Ronaldinho is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 12:54 AM   #54
michaelb
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 911
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronaldinho View Post
All I'm saying is that I've never had a discussion with a working writer - and I am one, and know a lot of 'em - about a long period of looking for an idea to please an agent or manager that was discussed with any sort of "that's a process I think was worthwhile and would be happy to go through again."

Now, maybe you represent all the people who had a great time going through that process, and somehow my social circle doesn't overlap with any of them. But you're talking about people in the business at a high level, and I'm talking about working writers repped at CAA, Gersh, and WME ... so, yeah, I think we're talking about rep working at a "high level" and writers doing the same.

You saying "quirky little movie" wasn't a figure of speech, by the way, it was being condescending and actually obscuring the real issue by attacking a straw-man version of my position.
I've never have had it go for a long period of time. And I've always found it to be a very smooth, organic, beneficial process for the writer.

Like I said, everyone is different, and everyone has different experiences, I can only speak from mine. There are also a lot of working writers at those agencies who go off and write ideas without vetting them, that then complain when their reps can't do anything with the idea. Which goes back to my first point, writers + reps = same team. You should all be working together towards the same goal.

Would it have been less condescending if I said "your own project"? Like I said, it was a figure of speech. If you go off and write something and your reps don't like it, then what?
michaelb is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 12:57 AM   #55
michaelb
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 911
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronaldinho View Post
Most - not all.

Please be careful about your assumptions.
That is exactly why I said "most" and not "all".
michaelb is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 01:03 AM   #56
MrEarbrass
Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 233
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelb View Post
The fact that you are sitting here actually arguing against writers coming up with ideas and sharing them with their reps on a regular basis while they try and find the next viable idea to write on spec is mind boggling to me.
I obviously wasn't saying this; these discussions are more interesting if you have the intellectual honesty not to argue against strawmen.

A writer doesn't need 520 trite ideas a year--he needs two or three good ones that he can execute. How he gets those good ideas depends on his process... maybe he sends his manager an avalanche of stuff or maybe he takes one little kernal of a story and spends a month developing it on his own. There's no one route.

For that reason I think that any manager who demands ten ideas a week from every client is--for lack of a better word--a hack. And any writer who lets his manager pick his next project from a list like that is doing himself a disservice. Your manager may know the other projects in the market better than you, he may know what's hot, but you damn well better know which idea is going to make the most unique and interesting story that showcases your skills. That's why you're the writer.
MrEarbrass is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 01:12 AM   #57
BattleDolphinZero
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,060
Default Re: How risky is this move?

I believe Lowell generally runs his ideas by his reps (particularly his managers). You guys can say you know high level writers but very few writers on Lowell's level still spec. He does.

Of course you run your ideas by your manager. If you don't, you may write somethign they can't support.
BattleDolphinZero is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 01:17 AM   #58
michaelb
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 911
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrEarbrass View Post
I obviously wasn't saying this; these discussions are more interesting if you have the intellectual honesty not to argue against strawmen.

A writer doesn't need 520 trite ideas a year--he needs two or three good ones that he can execute. How he gets those good ideas depends on his process... maybe he sends his manager an avalanche of stuff or maybe he takes one little kernal of a story and spends a month developing it on his own. There's no one route.

For that reason I think that any manager who demands ten ideas a week from every client is--for lack of a better word--a hack. And any writer who lets his manager pick his next project from a list like that is doing himself a disservice. Your manager may know the other projects in the market better than you, he may know what's hot, but you damn well better know which idea is going to make the most unique and interesting story that showcases your skills. That's why you're the writer.
I'm going to quote myself since you clearly missed it....

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelb View Post
Successful writers don't need help coming up with ideas the same way newly established ones do. And again, 10 is an arbitrary number. The point being, which was the whole point of this thread, is you should run your ideas by your reps. And while you are in that "what to write for Hollywood" stage, you should be sending in X amount per week.
Hmm....hack. Ok. If you say so.

You clearly have not read my other posts talking about the mutual partnership working relationship between a writer and his reps, so I'm really not going to argue this with you anymore.
michaelb is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 01:23 AM   #59
michaelb
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 911
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BattleDolphinZero View Post
I believe Lowell generally runs his ideas by his reps (particularly his managers). You guys can say you know high level writers but very few writers on Lowell's level still spec. He does.

Of course you run your ideas by your manager. If you don't, you may write somethign they can't support.
And as you know, he just sold one of those specs....





I should have stopped engaging an hour ago...
michaelb is offline  
Old 03-21-2011, 01:54 AM   #60
MrEarbrass
Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 233
Default Re: How risky is this move?

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaelb View Post
Hmm....hack. Ok. If you say so.

You clearly have not read my other posts talking about the mutual partnership working relationship between a writer and his reps, so I'm really not going to argue this with you anymore.
I don't understand what platitudinous posts about the relationship between managers and their clients have to do with this discussion. If I didn't value what a manager can bring to the table, I wouldn't have one.

On point... I trust my manager and agents' taste and run all of my ideas by them. But they would never, ever ask me to do what the OP described--because they trust my taste and because they understand their role. Perhaps that comes with experience.

Finally, one definition of a hack is applying a rule regardless of circumstance. So yeah, I stand by the opinion that if you are a manager who demands a certain number of ideas per week from all of your clients, you could probably put some more thought into the complexities of your job. That comment wasn't directed at you, by the way. I don't know you.
MrEarbrass is offline  
Closed Thread


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin Version 3.6.2
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Done Deal Pro

eXTReMe Tracker