Using "Cut To"

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Using "Cut To"

    I know the use of Cut To is considered redundant, as a new slug implies a cut, but is it acceptable to use Cut To to emphasize a cut?

    For example, character A and character B are in different locations and are telling their sides of a story. Halfway through A's flashback, I want to cut to the present location of B and begin B's flashback scene.

    From the slug line and ensuing scene description, it's clear we're in the present location of B, but the transition from one scene to the next seems it would benefit from a Cut To placed in between, from a reading perspective.

  • #2
    Re: Using "Cut To"

    In the abstract, yes. The situation you're describing sounds . . . confusing and I don't know that just using CUT TO will make it clearer.

    If they're in two different locations, it seems simpler to establish the two locations and then just use INTERCUT BETWEEN A & B and write their back-and-forth as needed

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Using "Cut To"

      Originally posted by JoeBanks View Post
      In the abstract, yes. The situation you're describing sounds . . . confusing and I don't know that just using CUT TO will make it clearer.

      If they're in two different locations, it seems simpler to establish the two locations and then just use INTERCUT BETWEEN A & B and write their back-and-forth as needed
      Agree.

      Also agree that "CUT TO" is an excellent way to emphasize a cut.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Using "Cut To"

        It can take up quite a lot of precious space so I only use it sparingly. Like others have said though it's good when you're using it for emphasis, gives it a sort of fluidity on the page.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Using "Cut To"

          Originally posted by BattleDolphinZero View Post
          Also agree that "CUT TO" is an excellent way to emphasize a cut.
          This is one of my favorite bits of advice from DD. Not a big deal, but a nice, simple, effective small one.

          I read it here maybe last year, and then studied it when I saw it in pro scripts. And, I think I get it and now use it well. In my scripts, there are probably 3-4 of them.

          It's like, if I were writing the Wizard of Oz, when Dorothy is swept up... When she lands, I'd set that up with a CUT TO:

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Using "Cut To"

            Thanks for the advice, guys. It's appreciated.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Using "Cut To"

              I use it fairly frequently, when the scene calls for it. I sometimes don't want to have a ton of slugs on each page, when the only move is going from, say, a living room in a house to the nearby kitchen.

              Also, using variants like SMASH TO: can help set the pacing and energy of the cutting.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Using "Cut To"

                Originally posted by Cinemaas View Post
                Also, using variants like SMASH TO: can help set the pacing and energy of the cutting.
                I agree.

                Sometimes you need these techniques to tell the reader / viewer where or when you are...using FLASH CUTS etc deals with the problem pretty well. They sometimes seem ham-fisted, but can be great when used correctly.
                It is by will alone I set my mind in motion. It is by the juice of Sapho that thoughts acquire speed, the lips acquire stains, stains become a warning. It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Using "Cut To"

                  I use CUT TO: to emphasize a change in location or time or whatever, but not between each slug. There are times when you want to call attention to the change because it might be confusing otherwise, or when you want the cut to punch the reader in the face - that's when I use CUT TO:

                  - Bill
                  Free Script Tips:
                  http://www.scriptsecrets.net

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Using "Cut To"

                    I looked through the FAQs, then here, and I found 1/2 the answer to my question.

                    Transitions; I found this : "if you refer to using CUT TOs and DISSOLVEs and other suchlike technical 'transition' stuff, you don't use 'em in a spec script... that's one of the major no-no's for newbies..."

                    I totallly agree that "CUT TO" is not necessary - in most scenery changes.

                    I used "DISSOLVE TO" in my transition from act one to act two because I wanted the reader to pause for a second on the final words in the dialog in act one, then slowly open on the same phrase in act two.

                    I hope someone will say this is OK

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Using "Cut To"

                      IMO, using DISSOLVES, MATCH CUTS, and other precise visual transitions shows you understand the grammar of filmmaking and indicates that I the reader am in good hands with you the writer.

                      Misuse or overuse them, and I'll think you're a pretentious grandstanding hack. :-)

                      TL;DR-- It's OK.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Using "Cut To"

                        Agree.

                        Use your dissolve, dude.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Using "Cut To"

                          Originally posted by Butch Jarvinen View Post
                          I looked through the FAQs, then here, and I found 1/2 the answer to my question.

                          Transitions; I found this : "if you refer to using CUT TOs and DISSOLVEs and other suchlike technical 'transition' stuff, you don't use 'em in a spec script... that's one of the major no-no's for newbies..."
                          No, it's not a major no-no for ANYONE.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X