Help with a scene

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  • Help with a scene

    I would appreciate any help with this courtroom scene.

    What I'm trying to do: a D.A. should have taken a plea, or at least gone after lesser, more provable charges, but he goes too far, trying the case for the maximum. The Defense Attorney is a barracuda in heels: she tears apart his case/his witness. She is exceptional at what she does, very passionate.

    Her winning gets a cop very mad. Perhaps the witness was a very proud cop, and she pretty much castrated him in public. Or maybe she got a cop killer off because the D.A went for murder one, when he should have gone for manslaughter? If that's the case, if you can't prove premediation, does the suspect just walk if you only went after him on the highest charge?
    Are there other crimes that fit this bill to you, less sensational than "cop killer"?

    Regardless, now our D.A. approaches the Defense Attorney for a plea, but it's too late, it's off the table. He's blown it because he wouldn't compromise.

    As this scene occurs pretty much right after the opening hook, I'm not looking to make it long-it's in the first ten pages, and I don't want this to drag on. Just need to establish the things I've listed above.

    I was toying with this: outside of the courtroom, a friend urges him to take a plea, tells him that this Defense Attorney is Satan, he will lose...he says don't worry about it. Then we just cut to a witness falling apart, she delivers like one line or two (making us realize she tore him apart, but not showing it at all), and then finishes. And we show our D.A. begging for a plea.
    Does this seem like cheating to you by skipping her performance?

    Thanks to all for any help you could give.

  • #2
    Re: Help with a scene

    Originally posted by seh
    I would appreciate any help with this courtroom scene.

    What I'm trying to do: a D.A. should have taken a plea, or at least gone after lesser, more provable charges, but he goes too far, trying the case for the maximum. The Defense Attorney is a barracuda in heels: she tears apart his case/his witness. She is exceptional at what she does, very passionate.

    Her winning gets a cop very mad. Perhaps the witness was a very proud cop, and she pretty much castrated him in public. Or maybe she got a cop killer off because the D.A went for murder one, when he should have gone for manslaughter? If that's the case, if you can't prove premediation, does the suspect just walk if you only went after him on the highest charge?
    Are there other crimes that fit this bill to you, less sensational than "cop killer"?

    Regardless, now our D.A. approaches the Defense Attorney for a plea, but it's too late, it's off the table. He's blown it because he wouldn't compromise.

    As this scene occurs pretty much right after the opening hook, I'm not looking to make it long-it's in the first ten pages, and I don't want this to drag on. Just need to establish the things I've listed above.

    I was toying with this: outside of the courtroom, a friend urges him to take a plea, tells him that this Defense Attorney is Satan, he will lose...he says don't worry about it. Then we just cut to a witness falling apart, she delivers like one line or two (making us realize she tore him apart, but not showing it at all), and then finishes. And we show our D.A. begging for a plea.
    Does this seem like cheating to you by skipping her performance?

    Thanks to all for any help you could give.
    The District Attorney is the one who would put a deal on the table - not the defense attorney. It's an offer to the defense, who then takes it back to their client - they either accept it or not.

    If the trial is finished, the defendant is "not guilty" - that's it - he's free. The D.A. can't retry him at a lesser charge on the same offense. Double Jeopardy.

    In reality a D.A. would never beg for a plea deal. And again, it's something that's offered in place of a trial by the District Attorney. Once the trial has begun, too late. If the defendant says no deal, I want a trial, that's what they get. If the D.A. can't prove the case, the defendant walks. Nothing can happen mid-trial.

    I think, if you're going to skip through the trial, I'd add another witness in there - "falling apart". Or give one a few more lines, so we do really get it.

    If you want to show that the D.A. blew it by not charging on a lesser offense - manslaughter - show him with his boss, who's pissed or with a colleague. Something like that. He can't (and wouldn't) go back to the defense with a deal.

    Hope this helps.

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    • #3
      Re: Help with a scene

      That helps a great deal. Thanks very much.

      Comment

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