Two questions, one thread

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    alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Thanks for the LEGIT feedback Hairy and Cyfres. Answered my question.

    I looked around but could not find the DEFINITIVE answer to these questions. Seems much of screenwriting is undefined, though pretends to be just the opposite.

    A
    alex whitmer
    Member
    Last edited by alex whitmer; 09-07-2006, 09:15 PM.

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  • altoption
    Member

  • altoption
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    I believe Writerly meant "inanity."

    Leave a comment:

  • Furry Mound
    User

  • Furry Mound
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Hairy, you should be able to now.

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  • alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Originally posted by writerly
    Alex,
    it's source.

    Are you for real? This is the epitome of innanity.
    Que?

    What are you talking about??

    Do you mean inaneness or insanity?

    A

    Always for real.

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  • alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Originally posted by Hairy Lime
    That only applies to spec scripts. Shooting scripts have camera angles all over the damn place.

    ETA: Furry, why can't I PM you?
    This I know, but a Newbie might not.

    A

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  • alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Originally posted by Hairy Lime
    I guess legend could be used for informing the reader, but not the audience. I'd probably write it something like this ...

    YEAR: 1942 - the audience doesn't need to know, but I thought you might want to.

    That's if it were a comedy.

    Otherwise I might fit it into the scene setting.

    Busy sidewalks with men in suits and women in classically styled dresses as 1940s automobiles pass by on the street.

    That's lame, but whatever.
    Works for me Harry. Thanks.

    A

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  • Hairy Lime
    Member

  • Hairy Lime
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    I guess legend could be used for informing the reader, but not the audience. I'd probably write it something like this ...

    YEAR: 1942 - the audience doesn't need to know, but I thought you might want to.

    That's if it were a comedy.

    Otherwise I might fit it into the scene setting.

    Busy sidewalks with men in suits and women in classically styled dresses as 1940s automobiles pass by on the street.

    That's lame, but whatever.

    Leave a comment:

  • alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    SUPER - A superimposition. One image merged into another image.

    My question on this is 'why for dates?'

    Also, what if we don't want to super the dates, but make clear for the reader a change in years (which is how I saw Legend used)

    A

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  • Hairy Lime
    Member

  • Hairy Lime
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Originally posted by alex whitmer
    I think a number of Writers would bristle at the mention of camera angles.
    That only applies to spec scripts. Shooting scripts have camera angles all over the damn place.

    ETA: Furry, why can't I PM you?

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  • alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Again from your rec.

    .Television. an additional image superimposed on the original video image: A super of the guest's name is included under the picture when the guest is introduced.

    Seems unclear to me. That is why I ASKED!!!!!!

    a

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  • Furry Mound
    User

  • Furry Mound
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Originally posted by alex whitmer
    1) What is the definitive difference between a screen play and a script?

    One in the same?
    Screenplay: What the movie is, on paper.
    Script: what the doctor gives me when I want some vicodin.

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  • alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    As I said. the dictionary is not always a reliable sourse.

    This from your recommeded site

    1)n
    a script for a film including dialogue and descriptions of characters and sets

    2)n
    The script for a movie, including descriptions of scenes and some camera directions.

    I think a number of Writers would bristle at the mention of camera angles.

    3) noun 1.a motion-picture or television scenario. 2.Older Use. a motion picture.

    No mention of TELEPLAY

    Thanks anyways.

    A

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  • Cyfress
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    If you read enough scripts, you'll come across a variety of ways to have words appear on the screen: SUPER, LEGEND, I've seen someone write SUPERIMPOSE, I've seen a writer simply state - 'the words "Six Years later" appear on the screen. It doesn't matter what you do, as lomg as the reader can make the connection.

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  • alex whitmer
    Member

  • alex whitmer
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    I like misspellings. Keeps it interesting.


    So, have you seen LEGEND used to show dates? I see it from time to time, and thought super was only to super-impose on the screen.

    A

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  • altoption
    Member

  • altoption
    replied
    Re: Two questions, one thread

    Originally posted by alex whitmer
    Dictionary doesn't alway explain how things are actually used in real life through changing times, etc.

    But thanks.

    A
    Not always, but I think you'll find it's suprisingly useful. And in this case, it's all in there. Plus, you'll avoid those nasty misspellings.

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