different languages

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  • different languages

    My script uses Hindi a number of times and I was just wondering where you write what language the character is speaking and would you do something like (in Hindi) random words or actually write them in Hindi or whatever language you're using?

  • #2
    Re: different languages

    I would use (in hindi) for full sentences, and sprinkle hindi words into an english dialogue where we can tell meaning by context.

    Actually, the 13th Warrior has a great use of other languages. well, in the finished film, I don't know about the script.

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    • #3
      Re: different languages

      I once tried this:

      Code:
                                         RIVERS
                               ASK HIM IF HE HEARD ANYTHING!
      
                     Holden steps closer to the second man, A NEPALESE SHERPER,
      
                                         HOLDEN
                                   (in Nepalese)
                               [I]HOW FAR?[/I]
      
                                         SHERPER
                               [I]ANOTHER DAY! OVER THE MOUNTAIN![/I]
      
                     Holden shoots a look at Rivers.
      
                                         HOLDEN
                               HE SAID NO!
      Now I only got one comment about not being sure whether the Sherper was speaking Nepalese or not because I only indicated it for Holden...though I kept this for all the other Nepalese lines in italics unless I wanted it otherwise.

      I may be completely wrong though...wait until some more smarter people chime in.
      One meets his destiny often in the road he takes to avoid it. - French Proverb

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      • #4
        Re: different languages

        that actually makes a lot of sence. It sure would make it a lot easier than having to write back and forth all the time which langauge is being spoken !! I really wasn't sure if you're supposed to put the indication of which language is being spoken directly before the dialogue or on a seperate line

        character
        (in Spanish) like this

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        • #5
          Re: different languages

          I would go with Oz on this one. You can mention it in parenthesis if it's a couple of sentences exchanges. IF your character speaks in another language for longer dialogues, I would suggest you mention it in your action scenes.

          JOE
          I'm fine with that.

          Joe turns from Frank and nods to Wong before conversing with him only in Cantonese.

          JOE
          I rather we talk somewhere else here.

          WONG
          Why? You don't believe this guy

          and so on and so forth, dialogue wise. It would save some space instead of always using the parenthesis.
          A talent for drama is not a talent for writing, but is an ability to articulate human relationships.
          Gore Vidal

          "Aisatsu Yori Ensatsu"
          Money is better than compliments.


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          • #6
            Re: different languages

            I use it later on the next page but I use all the foriegn lines in italics as a visual clue for the reader.
            One meets his destiny often in the road he takes to avoid it. - French Proverb

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            • #7
              Re: different languages

              Originally posted by OzFade View Post
              I use it later on the next page but I use all the foriegn lines in italics as a visual clue for the reader.
              Good call imho. It really comes down to a matter of personal choice but I would still not use italic/underlined for my writing. I try to be as concise as possible when I use a different language.
              A talent for drama is not a talent for writing, but is an ability to articulate human relationships.
              Gore Vidal

              "Aisatsu Yori Ensatsu"
              Money is better than compliments.


              Comment

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