I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

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  • I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

    Sometimes I feel like f*** the logline and the treatment and just writing down the script/story straight away. I just hate all this planning...

    Do you feel like that sometimes?
    I post too much.

  • #2
    Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

    Yes, I can only work this way.

    I sit down and start writing, sometimes in prose and sometimes in screenplay form. Often I try and write "character" scenes before the main story or tangential to it, but involving the characters. After about 15-50 pages of this crap, I hopefully have enough of a sense of the story to go back and outline, THEN I see if I can condense that to a logline.

    That accomplished, it's back to the outline, and then onto the real script. It's an incredibly roundabout and wasteful way to write, but it doesn't work for me any other way.

    And sometimes I end up right where I started. I'm working on two projects at the moment, a character-driven one room thing where this worked out really well and I've got a solid outline, and the sci-fi/thriller I posted on the logline section where it only confused me and muddled the story.

    I wish there was a better way for me, but there isn't. I think it will come with practice. I watched Tim Minear at his "breaking the story" session at expo a few years back, and he went through the same process that I do, except he did it in 90 minutes on a whiteboard and it takes me weeks or months.

    anyways, that's just me. My writing process is probably not a good one to follow.

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    • #3
      Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

      The best prep method for me is fleshing out a beat sheet. It frees me the most. Outlines and index cards are just too friggin contrived and confining for me. Everything has to start out as a gigantic lump of modeling clay. So I'll open up a doc in Word and free-beat the thing until I have a good five to ten pages. This beat sheet will often include specific dialogue and action, and that's perfectly OK.
      "I ask every producer I meet if they need TV specs they say yeah. They all want a 40 inch display that's 1080p and 120Hz. So, I quit my job at the West Hollywood Best Buy."
      - Screenwriting Friend

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      • #4
        Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

        Once I have a story idea and an ending in my head (and I've 'watched' it a number of times), I just start writing the script and aim for the finale.

        I write the logline last and don't bother with a treatment unless someone gives me a good reason to write one.
        TimeStorm & Blurred Vision Book info & blog: https://stormingtime.com//

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        • #5
          Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

          I start with the logline, then (if the concept is worthwile) outline using the 8 sequence method. I also have a specific beat sheet on hand when I go to script. That helps keep me on structure.

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          • #6
            Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

            If you're hating the prep, then it isn't the right method for you. Jump right in and throw yourself into the euphoria of story discovery along the way.

            All that anal planning isn't for everyone. Some writers can't live with out it, others are suicidal just thinking about it.

            Find what works for you and write.

            aw

            www.alexwhitmer.wordpress.com

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            • #7
              Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

              I've tried the index cards - didn't work. I haven't looked at them since I wrote every one of them months ago.

              I only do outlines if I come up with a good story WHILE I'm working on my current script/story and don't want to forget a beat of it by the time I get to working on it again.

              I agree with hscope, Loglines and Treatments don't make a good story; the story does. So I've pushed writing Loglines and Treatments way, WAY back on the priority list until somebody asks me for one or I have a good reason to write one. Loglines are fun: sometimes I sit around and think of wickedly random loglines out of thin air just to see if I could make a story ouf of them. For me, it's a good way to brainstorm.

              But yeah, MPrince, I hit that wall months ago and was about to say F*** it all. I had 'noted' and 'structured' myself to near insanity. I was trying to be so professionally perfect with my Loglines, treatments, and such that I forgot about the story.

              thanks
              brad
              People will think what I tell them to think when you tell what to tell them to think. ~ H. Simpson on being a critic

              http://www.mediafire.com/pop17scripts

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              • #8
                Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

                Originally posted by MPrince View Post
                Sometimes I feel like f*** the logline and the treatment and just writing down the script/story straight away. I just hate all this planning...

                Do you feel like that sometimes?
                You can do that. Actually, I have. But when I did I realized my first draft ended up being like a highly detailed outline.

                Nothing wrong with that but you have to accept you'll need to do a major rewrite and probably cut some scenes if you had meandered off point.
                Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. "Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.-

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                • #9
                  Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

                  Originally posted by MPrince View Post
                  Sometimes I feel like f*** the logline and the treatment and just writing down the script/story straight away. I just hate all this planning...

                  Do you feel like that sometimes?
                  That's the way I always feel, but I'd rather force myself to write an outline and discover major story problems there, rather than spend a lot more time writing actual scenes in screenplay format only to throw them away when I realize the story problems.

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                  • #10
                    Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

                    I remember trying to outline my novel the first time around. I don't think I ever looked at that outline again. I let the story write itself and found half the stuff that I thought I wanted to put into the story just didn't fit.

                    The first time I sat down to write a script, I knew the beginning and the end that I wanted... everything else just fell into line as I wrote.

                    My biggest problem doesn't lie in what comes next, it's how the what comes out, and I don't think any amount of outlining would solve that issue.

                    Everybody has their own style, though. There are no hard and fast rules about how you get the story out of your head... so if you want to just jump right in, go for it.
                    Words... they don't arrange themselves.

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                    • #11
                      Re: I just wanna get stuck in (Frustrated?)

                      I've tried a few methods, and the best one for me is a detailed outline -- up to 40 pages. Takes a month-ish to write. I love discovering a story and enriching them with characters. I resist the urge to write the actual script - it's hard. This is where the hard work is done -- the foundations of the work to follow.

                      When it comes to the script, I find that I discover things that an outline couldn't incorporate. Anyway, I just write a draft based on this outline -- takes about 2 - 3 weeks.

                      Then I print out the script and write a bunch of notes on every page. Finding the final theme and throughline during this time is essential.

                      Finally, spend about 4 weeks honing the final draft(s), incorporating all the notes.

                      Repeat.

                      Whatever works for you.
                      "What's worse than being talked about? Not being talked about."

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