Query Letter for Romantic-Comedy

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  • Query Letter for Romantic-Comedy

    Help! I've been stuck in trying to write a query for a romantic-comedy. All the examples I've come across in books and on the Web have been for suspense/thrillers or dramas - not one for a R-C (or even just a comedy). I can get across the dramatic/romantic portion of the script fine, but it seems like the comedy part is harder to include in a "professionally-toned" letter. Any input, advice, suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance and sorry for the long-winded post.

    PsyDoc

  • #2
    Are you looking for examples from folks on the board or looking for internet sites offering examples? If the first applies, please give us some info on the script. Thanks.

    And, looks like you just signed on today...welcome aboard.

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    • #3
      query

      It's no different than writing a query letter for any other style of screenplay. A few short sentences providing a brief synopsis of your script, who the main characters are and a hook to entice the reader to want to read the rest of the screenplay.

      If you are having trouble writing the query, you just haven't found the right words yet. Start with your logline and expand upon that.

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      • #4
        I always send one page synopsis with my queries. I don't tell anything about the screenplay in the cover letter except that it's a romantic comedy.

        It seems to be working out ok for me.

        Ignorance is bliss!

        Tina

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        • #5
          Have you sold anything ?

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          • #6
            Thanks to those who have already responded to my post, and for welcoming me aboard. It would be great if someone knew of existing examples of a R-C oriented query; the examples of queries I've seen are on more dramatic subjects and therefore I find my queries to be very serious in tone. I'm afraid prospective agents will not think I could write a romantic-COMEDY with such a serious query. Does that make sense? Oh, and I haven't sold anything as yet, but then again this is my first attempt at marketing a script.

            PsyDoc

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            • #7
              Hi Psy,

              I have two rom-coms. I wrote regular old short queries. Told them the genre, followed by the log line. I, personally, would be afraid to try and be funny in a query letter for fear of sounding like an idiot. There are probably people who could pull it off.

              Stick around you're likely to get some more informed suggestions.

              lilybet

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              • #8
                I think it's important to show your voice in a query letter. If you're trying to sell a comedy, it's essential to let the reader know that you have a sense of humor. I sent out 5 queries on a comedy last week. 4 of the production companies called and requested the script. The 5th company said that they didn't accept unsolicited scripts.

                Right now is a great time to be querying (due to the impending strike). So find your voice and start sending out letters.

                One tip...I usually send out 5 to 10 letters at a time. If I don't get a good response, then I tweak my letter and try again. Repeat the process until you get the response you want, then you can do a mass mailing.

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                • #9
                  PsyDoctor, (if you haven't already been here) here's one of the sites that I've posted to, as well as peruse: screenwritersmarket.com

                  Tons of loglines--maybe you can find some examples from other folks that can help you write your own Romantic Comedy logline. I'll send a couple more your way, when I figure out what's going on with them (problems accessing).

                  By the way, I agree with Write4food (I like that) in finding your own voice and adding flavor into your query letter that reflects the script you're proposing.

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