getting your vision across...

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  • getting your vision across...

    without stepping on the directors toes... I have something I want shown in my script, actually want it filmed a particular way... how can I state this without seriously offending?

  • #2
    That's a tough one. Best to try and describe what you want int he best detail you can without resorting to POV, Camera angles etc.

    Might want to be a little more specific so we can help you.

    Meltdown

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    • #3
      I want flashback scenes filmed on old 8mm B&W....

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      • #4
        As other will tell you - flashbacks are a dicey subject for newbies.

        Specifying INT. HOME - DAY (BLACK AND WHITE - FLASHBACK)

        is probably crossing hte line - too mugh direction per se.

        Why not have it that the flashbacks are linked to someone wathing old black and white 8mm film?

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        • #5
          Actually, I'm doing that too, but the first needs to be flashback, from a dying man in the hosp... then ties to the old movies later... why are flashbacks so taboo for newbies? I've never heard this sentiment before...

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          • #6
            'Cause some use it in a hoaky way or use it for exposition or backstory, when there might be a more creative way to tell the story.

            Should be a guideline to consider not a "rule." Do what you need to, to effectively tell your story.

            lil

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            • #7
              The idea is to tell you story in manner that having to flash back to a back story is not required.

              It comes to a point that you tell the story and leave it to the director to put it on the screen as he/she sees it is best presented.

              You might use in your slugs s descriptor like this ( somethign I recommended to another DDer that had black and white in the scene headings.


              EXT. BUILDING - DAY

              Bright summer day, but washed of all colors down to shades of grey and black.


              Tough call. I've come to the point where I just write with the understanding the director will have his own take of the material and if he really wants my opinion he'll likely give it to me or ask.

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              • #8
                Are there any directors that ARN'T so easily offended? Does anyone ever have anything positive to say about them? Oh, sure, I hear "He/She is brilliant" etc., but do any of them actually want to know what the writer/creator of the story wants? *sigh* maybe after I make my first million, I'll branch into directing, and let it be known that I'm human...

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                • #9
                  8mm B&W Flashbacks

                  The decision on HOW it's filmed isn't yours - you just tell the story. You can give them a flshback, but can't choose the film stock.

                  But you CAN do this:

                  INT. HOSPITAL - DAY - 1960 (FLASHBACK)

                  Like a scratchy old home movie in black and white. Martha is breast feeding John in the maternity ward. A NURSE enters with the newborn, startling John.

                  JOHN
                  I'm sorry. I saw all of the
                  babies doing it, and just...

                  INT. JOHN'S ROOM - DAY - PRESENT DAY

                  John smiles.

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                  • #10
                    Cheer up, Hey. If a director was not interested in your vision, he or she would not sign on to direct your script. That is mostly why people work on films, they like the material and you wrote it it is your vision. So just write your movie the best way you know how and if having the past in shades of black and white is the best way, you do that. That is not insulting anyone. It is telling your story the best way you can. No one will get mad at you for that.

                    And never try to write like a "beginner." All those "rules for newbies"? Toss them You are not competing with newbies. You are competing with pros. Use every tool at your disposal the best way you know how -- like a pro.

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                    • #11
                      Re: 8mm B&W Flashbacks

                      Opps! Didn't mean to hit the SEND button!

                      You can get away with putting it in the description in order to give the reader a feel for the scene... But the director WILL automatically shoot it differently. They don't like suggestions from screenwriters on how the film should look. BUT - if the feeling of 8mm B&W is CRITICAL to the scene, you can put it in there.

                      By the way - Flashbacks are often misused, so everyone says DON'T use them. I use them all the time. Use flashbacks for good - not evil - and they are okay. Also - flashbacks are part of the style of your script... so if you only use them once, you're doing it wrong. Either the script is a flashback script or not a flashback script. FRIED GREEN TOMATOES is a flashback script. RESERVIOR DOGS uses a flashback to add suspense to Act 2 (we have parallel stories in the film: The events leading to the robbery and the events after the robbery).

                      Plus - Greek Unity Of Time - you should always be flashing back to the same approx. time period. Too many different time periods in flashbacks is mondo confusing!

                      Okay, now I'm done.

                      - Bill

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                      • #12
                        Re: 8mm B&W Flashbacks

                        Whew! Thanks, Gig for the "rules for newbies," toss 'em.

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                        • #13
                          flashback

                          all of the above said is true...yes, even the conflicting mindsets about "rules for newbies" and whether to follow them or toss 'em. gig's attitude is spot-on, imho.

                          i read a good script that used a flashback in b/w by saying...

                          EXT. WAREHOUSE -- DAY

                          An old memory played back in monochrome:

                          Followed by the description of the action.

                          it was a good way of using that effect whilst being seamless and without getting too "technical".

                          cheers

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                          • #14
                            Re: flashback

                            Strange- thanks, that sounds like a great idea... Gig, I love the idea of throwing all of these piddily little rules out! (Ah! The freedom!)... and Bill, I will try to use my flashbacks for good, all the same time ref. etc... Thanks everyone for your input... one of the things I like best about posting here (other than finally feeling like I'm not alone anymore) is getting everyones different opinions... you guys are great!

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