the mythical orthodoxy of screenwriting

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  • warren
    Guest replied
    Re: Re: the mythical orthodoxy of screenwriting

    1. The first rule of Screenwriting is: you do not talk about Screenwriting.
    2. The second rule of Screenwriting is: you DO NOT talk about Screenwriting.
    3. If the agent says stop, goes limp, or taps out, the script needs a rewrite.
    4. Two agents to a fight.
    5. Always write one script at a time.
    6. Never write in a shirt, nor shoes.
    7. Scripts can go on as long as they have to.
    8. If this is your first attempt at Screenwriting, you have to write.

    Sorry, couldn't resist....

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  • AnconRanger
    Guest replied
    Re: Re: the mythical orthodoxy of screenwriting

    i don't think you need to write better than anybody, whatever that means.

    i'd say trying to compete against other writers is the biggest piece of horseshit ever spread. and i've spread it.

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  • NiteScribe
    Guest replied
    Re: the mythical orthodoxy of screenwriting

    Here are some guidelines I agree with.

    --Writer's write.
    --Trust your creative process.
    --Don't get it right, get it written.

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  • writerly
    Guest replied
    heehee. it is, it is.











    "That's how Faceless Joe lost his legs!" -Homer Simpson

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • A Pathetic Writer
    Guest replied
    #!?

    ! isn't a number.

    Is that some sort of Neo Zen thing?

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • writerly
    Guest replied
    rule#!

    DON'T BE BORING

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • Architeuthis Dux
    Guest replied
    Here's one:

    Knowing the difference between a good, saleable ideas and lousy ideas will actually help you come up with good, saleable ideas of your own.

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  • TonyRob
    Guest replied
    Yep. It's not enough that my script is better than David Clary's. It has to be better than Bill Wheeler's or Ryne Pearson's.

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • A Pathetic Writer
    Guest replied
    Dave Steinberg said much the same thing to me.

    Paraphrased:

    "It's not enough that your script is better than all the other specs out there. Your script has to be better than Mamet's or Goldman's. It's THEIR job you're trying to steal."

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • TonyRob
    Guest replied
    Always assure amateur writers that there are no "rules" when it comes to screenwriting... you know, in order to further minimize the competition.
    Actually, there would be no reason for a pro (or a talented, knowledgeable "almost pro") to do that "in order to further minimize the competition." Amateur screenwriters are not his/her competition.

    Pros are.

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  • Guest
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  • refriedwhiskey
    Guest replied
    Always assure amateur writers that there are no "rules" when it comes to screenwriting... you know, in order to further minimize the competition.
    Always let amateur writers who believe there are "rules" when it comes to screenwriting continue to believe it...you know, so they can remain amateurs.

    Leave a comment:

  • Guest
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  • TheKeenGuy
    Guest replied
    Always assure amateur writers that there are no "rules" when it comes to screenwriting... you know, in order to further minimize the competition.

    Leave a comment:

  • Guest
    Guest

  • sc111
    Guest replied
    Boobsie:

    That would be me. No offense taken.

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • Boobsie Malone
    Guest replied
    No offense to the poster who posted this, but this would be on my BS list:

    2. You will 'know' when you're ready. (Subtext: You'll never be ready.)

    Truth: You do know when you're ready. No subtext at all.

    2A. Don't send a script out until it's perfect. (Subtext: You'll never write a perfect script.)

    Truth: To send out your script in anything other than perfect condition is silly, imo. No subtext.

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  • Guest
    Guest

  • Zarakow
    Guest replied
    This is crap (happens quite often in thrillers):

    - Unclear or illogical motivation (often used to help the dramaturgy)

    Example: See "Saw": The "Zep-effect"

    Why does Zep enjoy threatening Dr. Lawrence Gordon's family?

    He's a victim himself and even if he thinks John is an "interesting patient" - it is not enough. It is illogical and/or unclear. The poison makes him forced to do something - not enyoing doing it!

    /H

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