Words to Eliminate...

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  • Re: Words to Eliminate...

    I picture the pros sat round a home poker table, beers at the ready, shaking their heads at this perpetual thread.
    I can confirm this.

    I just delivered an extra large pizza with double anchovies. Let's just say that they tip well and leave it at that.
    Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue

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    • Re: Words to Eliminate...

      Originally posted by Mr. Earth View Post
      Maybe "famished" or "exhausted" doesn't fit exactly, but there are plenty of better words to use instead of "very" something.
      I couldn't come up with a substitute for "very hungry," although I think different levels of "tired" are well covered -- both "fatigued," and "weary" would probably work. But the real question (for me) is, "why are you hating on 'very'?" "Very angry" and "very tired" are straightforward and clear.

      Heck, according to Webster's, even Shakespeare used very. "Was not my lord the verier wag of the two?" and (emphatically) "The very rats instinctively have quit it."

      Now, if you're talking about "very unique" or any modification of a word that can't be modified, I'm right there with you.

      (Wow! When did my naval lint dye itself lime green?)
      STANDARD DISCLAIMER: I'm a wannabe, take whatever I write with a huge grain of salt.

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      • Re: Words to Eliminate...

        Originally posted by Centos View Post
        I understand. I (usually) try to make it clear that, when responding, I'm using a specific post as an entry point into this "pet peeve" subject. This is kind of a sensitive area for me because (rightly or wrongly) I believe that whatever writing momentum I had built up early on (seven or eight years ago) was stunted by trying to follow these "so-called" rules. And I don't want others to fall into that trap.

        I understand that most folks understand that these "rules" are (or should be) guides to avoiding overuse of certain words or techniques. But there are those who insist that they are hard and fast "rules" that only pros can get away with disobeying. It's to those folks I'm really trying to argue my position. I apologize for using your post as a "stepping off point."
        No worries. Anyway, as far as I'm concerned the OP mentions tips not for writing but rewriting. A problem I still suffer from is re-writing while I'm writing. Makes no sense to waste time polishing turds.

        Personally I think if "Charlie Who" or Charlie Kaufman both wrote crap, they would both be rejected, unless Charlie Kaufman was directing and producing (paying for) his own movie.
        I'm inclined to agree.

        I still think too many people don't get this simple fact ... Pros were not always pros.
        And that's why I said that even though the rules are different, they're not necessarily unfair.

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        • Re: Words to Eliminate...

          Originally posted by Centos View Post
          I couldn't come up with a substitute for "very hungry," although I think different levels of "tired" are well covered -- both "fatigued," and "weary" would probably work. But the real question (for me) is, "why are you hating on 'very'?" "Very angry" and "very tired" are straightforward and clear.
          )
          Nobody will kill you for "very," and I can't say I never use it, but if you can find a word like ravenous or starving in place of very hungry, or furious or steamed instead of very angry, you can often communicate more precisely, visually and succinctly. The thesaurus is full of words with shades of meaning that can help you create a quick, precise mental image. Use it to remind you of your word choices, but always choose a word you know, because you can accidentally crack people up by picking, say, "affluent" as a synonym for "very rich" when you're talking about very rich ice cream.

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          • Re: Words to Eliminate...

            Originally posted by Joaneasley View Post
            Nobody will kill you for "very," and I can't say I never use it, but if you can find a word like ravenous or starving in place of very hungry, or furious or steamed instead of very angry, you can often communicate more precisely, visually and succinctly. The thesaurus is full of words with shades of meaning that can help you create a quick, precise mental image. Use it to remind you of your word choices, but always choose a word you know, because you can accidentally crack people up by picking, say, "affluent" as a synonym for "very rich" when you're talking about very rich ice cream.
            It just depends on the situation, sometimes "very hungry" has the right "feel." "Ravenous" or "starving" might be too dramatic for what you're saying.

            As for using a thesaurus, I haven't done so for years. I have seen some writers who do (mis)use them however -- and your point about "affluent" hits home. Here's another example (my brother reminded me of this one while we were talking today).

            The scene: a tough mob boss in his home. For some reason the writer had him cross his room four times, each time a different word was used for "walked," none of which really fit. The last time he used the word "sashayed." This was not a comedy -- at least it wasn't intended to be one.
            STANDARD DISCLAIMER: I'm a wannabe, take whatever I write with a huge grain of salt.

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            • Re: Words to Eliminate...

              Folks, please bear in mind that this is not the "One on One" forum with its various hijinks.

              "The fact that you have seen professionals write poorly is no reason for you to imitate them." - ComicBent.

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              • Re: Words to Eliminate...

                So I can't ask for a 7 letter word for a man who licks a baby monkey's butt for 2 hours? It's for a crossword puzzle.

                - Bill
                Free Script Tips:
                http://www.scriptsecrets.net

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                • Re: Words to Eliminate...

                  Originally posted by wcmartell View Post
                  So I can't ask for a 7 letter word for a man who licks a baby monkey's butt for 2 hours? It's for a crossword puzzle.

                  - Bill
                  I'm gonna take a guess and say the man would be called a zoo-keep.


                  Zoo Keeper Helps Constipated Monkey Pass Peanut By Licking Its Butt...

                  As stories about a Chinese zoo keeper licking a monkey's butt in order to save its life is by far the most endearing.

                  After a young Francois' leaf monkey in his care consumed a peanut that had been tossed into its enclosure, Wuhan Zoo employee Zhang Bangsheng noticed that the animal had become dangerously constipated.


                  Being too big to pass through the monkey's system naturally, the peanut had to be extracted manually. Apparently, that meant licking it out.


                  Zhang told local reporters the three-month-old lutung was too small for laxatives, so he had no choice but to extract the wayward legume with his lingua. After washing the its bottom with warm water (because not doing so would be disgusting), Zhang spent an hour polishing the monkey's pooper before the peanut finally popped out.


                  What became of it is up to your filthy imagination, but chinaSMACK says the caretaker subsequently "laughed with satisfaction."


                  Good luck with that... ahem... crossword puzzle, Bill.
                  il faut d'abord durer

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                  • Re: Words to Eliminate...

                    Zoo Keeper Helps Constipated Monkey Pass Peanut By Licking Its Butt For An Hour
                    This surely is not dinner time conversation.
                    Last edited by titans; 05-05-2012, 05:56 AM.

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                    • A Vizament

                      Originally posted by ComicBent View Post
                      Folks, please bear in mind that this is not the "One on One" forum with its various hijinks.
                      Sirrah, harken unto y-cleped Comicbent, an orgulous bawcock and leech, with his Xanthippe nick and hest, to scribble thy quintains thither at "One on One", lest ye are harried and attasked for thy horn-mad termagants of vinewed palabras and enmew thy zany hurtling hither.
                      JEKYLL & CANADA (free .mp4 download @ Vimeo.com)

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                      • Re: Words to Eliminate...

                        Fortean, you had me at bawcock.

                        From Shakespeare's Henry V:

                        The king's a bawcock, and a heart of gold,
                        A lad of life, an imp of fame;
                        Of parents good, of fist most valiant.
                        Er-uhm ... Forget that "fist" part. Wouldn't want to give the impression that I, well, you know.

                        Bawcock = fine fellow.

                        Oh, my goodness, am I hijinking?

                        "The fact that you have seen professionals write poorly is no reason for you to imitate them." - ComicBent.

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                        • A Pistol's Words

                          Originally posted by ComicBent View Post
                          Bawcock = fine fellow.

                          Oh, my goodness, am I hijinking?
                          The king's a bawcock, and a heart of gold,
                          A lad of life, an imp of fame;
                          Of parents good, of fist most valiant.
                          Henry V, Act 4, Scene 1, 44-46.

                          Aye, thou dost, i' fecks.

                          "Bawcock";
                          JEKYLL & CANADA (free .mp4 download @ Vimeo.com)

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                          • Re: Words to Eliminate...

                            "Bawcock";
                            Mais oui, c'est vrai.

                            Excuse my French.

                            "The fact that you have seen professionals write poorly is no reason for you to imitate them." - ComicBent.

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                            • Re: Words to Eliminate...

                              I hope thou speakest not of country matters.
                              We're making a movie here, not a film! - Kit Ramsey

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