Stutter zoom?

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  • #16
    Re: A Suggestion

    Originally posted by Fortean View Post
    RAPID SERIES OF SHOTS (AXIAL CUTS):



    For another example, (more rapid cutting than my previous reference), @ 1:10 to 1:12 in this clip from Hitchcock's THE BIRDS
    Yep. That's it. I've seen it used a lot in Kurosawa, Hitchcock and Capra but also a lot of cheesy exploitation and Western films.

    (Side note regarding your link, a handy tip I've found useful: if you pause the youtube video where you want to start it from, right-click the video and select "Copy video URL at current time" you get a link directly to the specific time - i.e. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...iH8bWFdM#t=69s

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    • #17
      Re: Stutter zoom?

      Originally posted by Rhodi View Post
      The thing I'm trying to describe is even more rapid than that action description. It's like Fortean's Axial Cut but way quicker - Like SHOT SHOT SHOT SHOT down onto a specific object.

      Thanks for the suggestions, all. Thought there might be a shorthand I could use, but I'll figure out something on the page.
      Back in the day, us editors used to say "Jump Cut" for any edit without an effect transition (dissolve, wipe, etc.) that showed the same angle on a same subject but at focal lengths closing in tight or coming out wide, or edits that deleted sections of the zoom to achieve the zoom-in effect without the length of the entire zoom. (see Fortean's definitive link on "Axial cut.")

      In your case, maybe invent the term "Staccato Jump Cuts" or "Staccato Cuts."
      Last edited by Clint Hill; 07-14-2013, 03:16 AM.
      "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

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      • #18
        Re: Stutter zoom?

        Originally posted by TigerFang View Post
        Back in the day, us editors used to say "Jump Cut" for any edit without an effect transition (dissolve, wipe, etc.) that showed the same angle on a same subject but at focal lengths closing in tight or coming out wide, or that deleted sections of the zoom to achieve the zoom-in effect without the length of the entire zoom. (see Fortean's excellent link on "Axial cut.")

        In your case, maybe invent the term "Staccato Jump Cuts" or "Staccato Cuts."
        I suppose he could just say, "MOVE IN in on "X" in a series of rapid jump cuts."

        That leaves very little to the imagination.

        NMS

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        • #19
          Re: Stutter zoom?

          I like Jeff's approach because I can see what the writer intends the reader to see as the reader reads the story. Axial cut just tells me that we zoom into the subject in steps not what we focus on in each step.

          With the Hitchcock film, first we notice a body on the floor against the wall. Then we see a blody face. Then empty eye sockets as we get closer.

          As I read a script and get carried away by the story, I like to get a picture of what is happening. I don't stop to imagine how I'd film it if I were a director.
          Last edited by jonpiper; 07-13-2013, 11:32 PM.

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          • #20
            Re: Stutter zoom?

            Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post
            Although correct, I would not call it an axial cut. You'd just have to explain it anyway. I'd probably do it something like:

            "In the distance, a car pulls up in front of a bar.
            CLOSER as the door opens. A man steps out.
            CLOSER. His shirt is covered with blood.
            CLOSER. He's got a gun in his hand.
            CLOSER. His face fills the frame. His ear is shot off - dried blood cakes his face."
            This solution idea works well, doesn't stall the read, and shows imagination, too. It could also be written as a paragraph to take up fewer lines.
            Last edited by Clint Hill; 07-14-2013, 03:49 PM.
            "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

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