Nemesis

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nemesis

    In one of my screenplays under construction, my hero has obstacles not created by another character as the nemesis; instead they are created by the accepted societal mores of the day.

    In a screenplay such abstract concepts are ordinarily represented by a nemesis character who serves to embody such concepts, and in interacting with the hero, the nemesis creates the obstacle for the hero's outer motivation.

    Is it inadvisable, then, for me to have these abstract concepts represented by several characters' actions (rather than just one) to represent the societal mores of the day in a way that will not go unnoticed by a reader/audience and get the point across?

    Collectively these nemeses would thwart the hero's outer motivation, as would a singular nemesis.

    Could anyone offer movie examples of this 'abstract nemesis' or 'multi-nemesis' method of revealing the nemesis/nemeses? Thanks.
    Last edited by Clint Hill; 09-16-2013, 06:24 PM.
    "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

  • #2
    Re: Nemesis

    Maybe "A League of Their Own"?
    "Ratatouillie" had two primary antagonist and a social more.
    Possibly "American History X"

    Tricky one.
    SL35
    SL35
    Potent dreamer. Newb disclaimer.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Nemesis

      Try films based on Jane Austin and Charles Dickens works --versions of Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility and Emma for her, versions of A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations and Oliver Twist for him. Both authors
      create characters that exemplify the attitudes of the day through actions that cause plot obstacles for the embattled protagonists.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Nemesis

        I'm more of a comedy guy, where this is common, but many times it's handled differently.
        Not sure of your genre, so this may not be any help.

        I don't think you have to formally create a nemesis for each of the obstacles.
        As you insert obstacles for your protagonist, illustrate them in the best possible way. Whatever that may be.
        For your story, it may mean creating a nemesis to do this in some instances, but I
        wouldn't force myself to think of an obstacle and then creating a "bad" guy for the antagonist to defeat/overcome as a rule.

        I also think you should be open to letting the protagonist create some of the obstacles.
        ( They are their own worst enemy. )
        If these obstacles are exacerbated by a character flaw, it's great way to help develop character arc.


        A couple examples of this:
        40 Year Old Virgin
        Yes Man
        Little Miss Sunshine ( It could be argued that each protagonist is also their own nemesis, and by the end of the movie they "defeat" them.)

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Nemesis

          Put a face on it.

          In ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST it's McMurphy against authority figures... and Nurse Rached is the face of authority.

          In COOL HAND LUKE we also have a fight with authority, and the chain gang Captain is the face of that authority.

          (etc)

          Make the abstract concrete.

          - Bill
          Free Script Tips:
          http://www.scriptsecrets.net

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Nemesis

            Originally posted by wcmartell View Post
            Put a face on it. In ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST it's McMurphy against authority figures... and Nurse Rached is the face of authority. In COOL HAND LUKE we also have a fight with authority, and the chain gang Captain is the face of that authority. (etc) Make the abstract concrete. - Bill
            Indeed. That does make identification more readily acceptable for an audience.
            Last edited by Clint Hill; 09-17-2013, 10:33 AM.
            "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Nemesis

              Many thanks to all who offered their helpful input and insight.
              Last edited by Clint Hill; 09-17-2013, 03:02 PM.
              "Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.- - Ray Bradbury

              Comment

              Working...
              X