Selling your jokes on the page

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  • #16
    Re: Selling your jokes on the page

    I'm not a comedy writer. Probably why I have the most respect for them, because it just seems so hard. But the fact that you are so thoughtful in your approach leads me to believe you're going to be successful.

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    • #17
      Re: Selling your jokes on the page

      perfect example of why comedy is so tough to do right... so subjective what s funny!

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      • #18
        Re: Selling your jokes on the page

        Originally posted by Recreant View Post
        I thought the joke was supposed to be "it'll just be a 30 foot drop"... which seems like a pretty big drop.

        Huh...
        +1

        Last night in San Pedro

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        • #19
          Re: Selling your jokes on the page

          Judging purely from my own scripts that were made into short films, anytime I needed a joke to be clear I used the technique you pointed out before: separating a joke by a bit of action. Readers, and sometimes actors (usually the mediocre ones), get lost in the jumble of dialogue and can't really find the tone that's suppose to come out of it. So if you clearly delineate between the two tones, it should read better.

          This might be a problem with character inconsistency, however. Often when quick jokes don't quite jab, it's because your character just comes out of the blue with a funny little thing to say when they had never done it before that moment. But if your character is always throwing out little sardonic quips left and right, people will expect it, feel comfortable with it, and even look out for it.
          "...it is the thousandth forgetting of a dream dreamt a thousand times and forgotten a thousand times."
          --Franz Kafka "Investigations Of A Dog"

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          • #20
            Re: Selling your jokes on the page

            Ditto I thought the 30 ft. death drop (from a stalled plane?) was the joke. That other dialogue didn't seem nearly as important as the situation. How fast is the stalled vehicle moving?

            Reminds me of the Will Farrell / Marky Mark film where they get blown to the ground by an explosion and start complaining how Hollywood lies! Explosions hurt.
            Hell of a Deal -- Political Film Blog

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            • #21
              Re: Selling your jokes on the page

              Originally posted by Ronaldinho View Post

              I don't know, off the top of my head, what the best approach is. It's going to have to be some stuff that I play with. It's interesting because when I've written thrillers or horror films or dramas, well, I think the thrills/horror/drama are obvious on the page. But comedy, maybe not always.

              Thanks again to everyone who chimed in.
              Maybe we should think in terms of humor on the page vs jokes on the page.

              Sometimes our goal is to make the scene humorous through action and description and at other times we want to add humor through dialogue to a serious situation, e.g., telling a joke in a foxhole during a battle.

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