Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

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  • Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

    Hi everyone!

    I made a much easier version of the Screenplay-Structure-Sheet. It has 12 pages now. Well, it's about structure, not really about writing. I will not tell you how to write a screenplay, this is up to you - you are a storyteller or you are not. No one really can teach you writing / storytelling. It's a matter of talent. In this sheets I'm talking more about timing / structure.

    NOTE: Download the file onto your computer - you can't blow the PDF up without downloading it first onto your computer. Open it with Adobe Reader. Blow up the PDF to 100 % or more or less, then press the space bar (your mouse cursor will change into a hand) + press the left button of your mouse at the same time, then move your mouse up and down, from left to right and from right to left to read the sheet. You can study the sheet on your computer.

    http://movie-structure.blogspot.de


    [/B]What do you think about this new version? Thanx for your time.
    [/COLOR]
    Last edited by Hans Gruber; 12-20-2017, 02:27 AM.

  • #2
    Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

    Hi everyone!

    I just want to let you know that I changed the first page of the structure-sheet. It's still the same link.

    Thank you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

      hey, the link/web page doesn't open for me.


      *never mind. It does now.


      **love your dedication, dude, and enthusiasm but I still feel like I need a loupe to fully appreciate what you've done here. But again, it could just be me. On a side note, isn't the only difference between a 3 act structure vs. a 4 act structure = a midpoint? The midpoint turns it from a 3 to 4 act? And what would classify as a 3 act structure? Can you name a movie where there is no midpoint?

      ***one last thing, my humble suggestion would be to take page one where you have all those acts listed on one page and instead give them each their own, separate page. Anyhoo, best of luck
      Last edited by bjamin; 03-04-2016, 08:41 AM. Reason: ***

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

        Story structures have two key components: Pacing and Events. What you're saying is that pacing can be learned by simply paying attention to great stories and how they build and escalate a story. This type of event happens in the first ten minutes, that type of event in the middle, etc. As a writer, it's tough to conjure up the perfect pacing at the beginning of a project. Scripts are usually a lot longer than 120 pages if you add up on the outlining and page writing that goes on during the process. One thing you can be sure of, is that after that passion draft where the story pours out of you your pacing will need a ton of work. If pacing is something that takes shape after a few rewrites, then those early drafts should be about events. Some make it in, some don't, some develop to a better event that wasn't previously thought of.

        Even if you outline, and have sixty scenes labeled out. That first pass through of the script will not be perfectly paced out.

        Sometimes, especially for amateurs, I can't attest to what pros do but for middle of the pack writers trying to bring something like pacing right away to Day 1/Page 1 of the first draft can be a crippling thing.

        Pacing is the timing portion of structure, the emotional resonance comes from the events themselves.

        Imagine me asking you Hans, do you think you can put together a picture story for me that makes me feel courage or anger or laughter? You'd probably say yes as most would, I would. But the reality of it is, you can't teach event creation/development. Some are real good at it, some aren't. The ones that are what I've noticed is that they use everything at their disposal as a writer, meaning the scene setting has significance, every line of dialogue focused and to the point. character objectives clearly outlined. Every line of narrative leading you deeper and deeper into the story.

        Imagine if the back of screenplays had a dietary list of ingredients. On the back of pros it would read 100% Story 0%Fluff. Amateur scripts at best are 50/50, most of them. Because some are worse and some are better. I struggle with the economics of a story greatly. Probably the biggest hole in my game as we'd say in the poker world.

        The point is Hans, you can't create a sheet that really teaches structure. You can highlight pacing, to any film, what you'll find is that they move. Things are happening. Why? It was put together by someone that's been through this story dozens of times, combing over every word of it. They know the ins and outs and made important decisions on what their events will be and have cut them together perfectly.

        You can possibly learn the empty shells of structure from book and stuff, the bare bones of it and the labels that are used for the real important events. The flesh to fill those bones can not be taught. Which is why McKee and Syd Field can teach classes on writing a great script but they themselves can not write one.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

          Hi bjamin,

          thanx for your feedback.

          Originally posted by bjamin View Post
          but I still feel like I need a loupe to fully appreciate what you've done here.
          Did you downloaded it onto your computer first? You can't blow up the PDF without downloading it first onto your computer.

          Originally posted by bjamin View Post
          The midpoint turns it from a 3 to 4 act?
          You can have also 4 acts without a midpointdisaster. Usually a disaster can trigger the next act. In Thelma and Louise the disaster J.D. stole the money of Louise don't triggers the next act. It's a disaster which triggers the inner conflict of Themla. But act 3 starts with the robbery.

          Originally posted by bjamin View Post
          Can you name a movie where there is no midpoint?
          No. I'm sorry. Sorry, but all this midpoint-thing happend because of gurus who have no clue how a movie can be structured. The so-called midpointdisaster is just a disaster wich can trigger the next act.

          Originally posted by bjamin View Post
          ***one last thing, my humble suggestion would be to take page one where you have all those acts listed on one page and instead give them each their own, separate page. Anyhoo, best of luck
          Do mean I should divide the first page of these twelve pages - the 4 acts of JAWS - into 4 pages so that I have a sinlge page for every act of JAWS? Sorry, if I misunderstood you. My english is not so good.


          Hi Cyfress,

          thanx for your feedback.

          Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
          Story structures have two key components: Pacing and Events.
          I belief that the events determines the pacing.

          Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
          What you're saying is that pacing can be learned
          I'm not talking about pacing. I am talking about timing: 1 - 41 - 71 - 91 .....

          Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
          Pacing is the timing portion of structure
          I also don't think in pacing. I just tell my story, and it gets worse and worse for the hero = pacing - in my opinion.

          Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
          The point is Hans, you can't create a sheet that really teaches structure.
          What I understand is that structure is the assembly of parts and the use of this parts determines the pacing. Parts: Disaster, MaD, EMaD, Relief... You have one disaster after the other you have a high pace. You have one Relief after the other you have a slow pace. If the disasters get worse and worse the pace also rises. Just my opinion.

          Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
          The flesh to fill those bones can not be taught.
          I'm not talking about storytelling.

          Originally posted by Hans Gruber View Post
          I will not tell you how to write a screenplay, this is up to you - you are a storyteller or you are not. No one really can teach you writing / storytelling. It's a matter of talent.
          You have an onliner I can use to show what I like to explain with the sheet?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

            i downloaded it. And the text boxes are tiny. And I mean tiny. You can expand the material so the viewer isn't forced to zoom in so close by giving each act in your JAWS 4 act diagram thing, its own page, Act 1 on page 1, Act 2=2, 3=3, 4=4 to allow you the space needed to increase the font to a suitable size. Just a suggestion, though.


            I used Adobe to view it but it has limited features. I can't hold the click button down to move the image around while in zoom.
            Last edited by bjamin; 03-04-2016, 12:45 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

              bjamin,

              blow up the PDF to 100 % or more or less, then press the space bar (your mouse cursor will change into a hand) + press the left button of your mouse at the same time, then move your mouse up and down, from left to right and from right to left to read the sheet.
              Last edited by Hans Gruber; 03-04-2016, 03:19 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                Hans...

                1) It's the ORDER of the events that determine pacing. The events determine the drama.

                2) Pacing is Timing Hans. A well paced story as all the right beats happening at the right times to best peak the interest of the reader. I mean what else could you determine by clocking movies if its not pace?

                3) I'm very well aware of the slogan for making things tough for the hero. It's kind of one of the most empty euphemisms in all of screenwriting. I can have my hero step outside his house where he gets shot at by a sniper but narrowly escapes. He crawls to his car and gets in to start it, only it doesn't. He gets out where the sniper takes another shot at his head but misses. The man gets up where he sees a world war two type tank rolling down the street.

                Tough to have a harder day than that.

                4) I'm familiar with how structure is explained. Uhm, its a little bit deeper than the whole Disaster/Relief pattern that you think you'll just be able to organize in your script. First, pacing and structure is sometimes specific to genre. Sci-Fi adventure won't hold the same pace as aserious drama.

                That's like saying computer code is made up of 0's and 1's what do you mean I don't know how to do it?

                5) Of course we're talking about storytelling, what the hell are we talking about?

                6) There's nothing wrong with having all these thoughts about structure and pacing, and even being motivated enough to go through movies minute by minute, make up an entire paradigm that shares insight to what types of events are happening in the beg., middle, and end of a story. There's nothing wrong with it and it will only help you.

                What I'm trying to explain to you is, the POV of the next maturation plateau. It's not about lists and labels. Picasso didn't sit down and say hey, I wanna paint a Picasso. He just painted what was inside of him. We know that mimicking successful stories guarantees nothing in terms of quality. It doesn't matter that writers sit down and they know in the first ten pages they have to create the vaccum for change and as soon as that is accomplished, you intro the premise or i.i. We all know that right, but yet when you read another's script the first fifteen pages reads like they've put no effort into accomplishing any of that at all.

                Amateur story tellers like to look at structure as a confining force of storytelling, when really it should be a perpetuitous force with endless possibilities, not confinded ones.

                If you created a sheet that labeled the 60 must have scenes of every screenplay, then someone sat down and tried to create a script using the 60 scene template they would find it extremely difficult to do.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                  I'm sure you put in a lot of effort into these structure sheets, but so did all the other screenwriting guru's who also swear their method is for real.

                  See, I know for a fact that there exists no such thing as a beat or structure sheet that will help you consistently write great scripts (Because it would imply there's a science to a subjective field) Therefore, I can logically conclude your method won't either without even understanding it.

                  Great scripts never came from a structure sheet.
                  I'm never wrong. Reality is just stubborn.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                    Here's what I've learned from reading scripts, books, and interviews.

                    In the beginning scripts move, they waste no time in setting up the world, the hero, and the theme. They create a balance that has a positive or negative charge to it. Either the hero is in a great place in life and the i.i. will be a negative charged event or vice versa. One the opening charge is fully solidified, its time to bring in the concept or the premise. The scenes you have after the i.i. in act one either portray what they label the 'refusal to the call'. That do that because the word refusal automatically implies conflict. Really, these 3 - 5 scenes after the i.i really need to raise the question of Will the hero succeed in their attempt? People label this the MDQ, major dramatic question. It's the question that will be in doubt right up to the end. The question you grapple with in this literary thesis called a screenplay. You need multiple POVs on the question, have them conflict against one another and make your case for the winner.

                    The Middle is where screenplays go to die, mine included, which is why I am paying super close attention to that 60 pages or so in the middle, and carefully plotting the main plot and two subplots in a script I am working on now. Here's where you really need to be armed with clear POVs and sides to the issue. Because you want to create a battle where it is a give and take, each one gaining advantages and suffering disadvantages. Great 2nd Acts always have a few good turns to the story. A turn is a reversal or an introduction of some new force added to the mix. You're not just gonna carry 60 pages of entertainment without properly timed turns. People always eye up the dead smack middle of the script for a good turn, they often call it the Mid-Point reversal. The truth is, you need to be writing in this reversal style all throughout. That means you need to be setting up to look like 'A' is going to happen, only to have B happen. I'm almost taking a Jeoprody approach to this script. Define your climax whether it be in a scene, a sequence, an Act, or a script and then ask what is the set-up to that? How do I make that climax scene impactful? What needs to happen prior so that this scene or this line of dialogue has such great impact on the story and the reader? One you get to the end of ACT 2, all you have to make sure is one thing. That turn at the end of ACT 2 called the ACT 2 climax, what you need to make sure of or set-up is an event that has the opposite charge of your ACT 3 climax. If you're ACT 3 ends down, your ACT 2 ends up and vice-versa.

                    ACT 3 is where you display the path that is actually taken by the hero to win. Its a path the reader hasn't seen because they were interested with other paths taken during ACT 2. You make your argument for the outcome and it needs to be good. You make things come together that seems feasible but over looked by the reader this whole time, then you hit them with that climactic scene at the end which was probably one of the first scenes to come to you. That scene that just says it all and sews it all up.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                      Act II is a dance ...

                      A dance between the hero and his opponents.

                      Each character has a goal and thus needs a plan to reach it.

                      Act II is then comprised of a series of revelations: What actions the hero takes, showing why they fail (because of actions the opponents took) or why they succeed.

                      In genres, the second act takes a specific form:

                      - CAT & MOUSE GAME (Action, Crime, Horror,Thriller)
                      - COURTSHIP (Love)
                      - INVESTIGATION (Detective)
                      - etc.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                        I understand the focus on structure for writers who don't plan to direct their own scripts. Widely agreed that a screenplay shouldn't be more than 110-115 pages, so you need to work out some kind of structure so you don't paint yourself in a corner.

                        And yet as mentioned above, so much depends on the genre, whether you're writing an ensemble story (often in comedy, where there isn't a cut-and-dried hero/villain dynamic), and other elements. Plus there are many other possible structures for telling a story: http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...e-new-disorder

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                        • #13
                          Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                          Well, yeah! You should find the structure of YOUR story, not squeeze your story into a pre-determined structure.

                          Still, structure is king.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                            Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
                            He just painted what was inside of him
                            That is the best way to work. Let all out, then structure it the best way. I just revealed how Hollywood structure their stories.

                            Originally posted by FoxHound View Post
                            who also swear their method is for real
                            It's not a method, it's a flexible cake-pan for your cake mixture. And I will not tell you how much sugar you should put into your cake mixture.

                            Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
                            They create a balance that has a positive or negative charge to it. Either the hero is in a great place in life and the i.i. will be a negative charged event or vice versa. One the opening charge is fully solidified, its time to bring in the concept or the premise. The scenes you have after the i.i. in act one either portray what they label the 'refusal to the call'. That do that because the word refusal automatically implies conflict. Really, these 3 - 5 scenes after the i.i really need to raise the question of Will the hero succeed in their attempt?
                            I don't think in that way. I do this, when I write my story:

                            Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
                            He just painted what was inside of him
                            NO RULES! I'm in charge of my story. I controll everything. Nothing controls my story. I don't care about i.i and other stuff. And then I structure the story to get the best impact with my story.

                            Originally posted by Cyfress View Post
                            If you're ACT 3 ends down, your ACT 2 ends up and vice-versa.
                            I don't think so. In Die Hard end of act 2 (well, for me it's end of act 3): Gruber opens the safe. End of act 3 (4): Happy end. Both ends are up.

                            Yaso,

                            I even don't think in genre.

                            Originally posted by Yaso View Post
                            Act II is then comprised of a series of revelations: What actions the hero takes, showing why they fail (because of actions the opponents took) or why they succeed.
                            This is too much for me to concentrate on. I don't care about a series of revelations, or why the hero fails.

                            Originally posted by Yaso View Post
                            not squeeze your story into a pre-determined structure.

                            Still, structure is king.
                            Do you know how to structure a thriller?

                            castilleja,

                            how long would be a movie if the screenplay has 110-115 pages?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Much easier version of Screenplay-Structure-Sheet

                              Sounds like, Hans, you are a total subconscious writer. What and how it comes out of you is what the story is. Usually only the natural talents can have a subconscious like that, most writers have to consciously analyze what their subconscious has spit out.

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