The Last 10 Days

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  • #31
    Re: The Last 10 Days

    First answer the thread question of what you're doing writing wise. Then I'll consider it.

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    • #32
      Re: The Last 10 Days

      Originally posted by TigerFang View Post
      Cool. Cyfress, Bono: thanks for these links!
      Yeah lots of good stuff.

      I rewrote more of my spec today. What about everyone else???

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: The Last 10 Days

        Nothing. Absolutely nothing.

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: The Last 10 Days

          10 days for SL. Working 10-13 hours a day, six days this week, bouncing around day and night shifts so fatigue is setting in.... but


          the fatigue, change of routine and jobs has set me thinking. Selected one out of four Tv concepts to move ahead with, started work on a bible, and first episode and promo, put out feelers to a local Kiwi Sci fi author who's apparently discussing turning one of his novels into a series and touched base with a guy attempting to put together a local film/TV liaison bureau in the region I live in.

          Equally importantly I quit a hobby that was sucking up time without reward - cold turkey

          Not a bad effort I think but a lot of it stems from our COVID lockdown. we were out for a month, we had possibly the best autumn weather I've seen and people just chilled and started seeing things from a different light
          I heard the starting gun


          sigpic

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          • #35
            Re: The Last 10 Days

            Originally posted by Bono View Post
            First answer the thread question of what youre doing writing wise. ...
            Waxing my crayon, at least twice a day.

            Originally posted by Bono View Post
            ... Then Ill consider it.
            Well, that's a poor deal.
            Know this: I'm a lazy amateur, so trust not a word what I write.
            "The ugly can be beautiful. The pretty, never." ~ Oscar Wilde

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: The Last 10 Days

              Come on Crayon -- go full Good Will Hunting -- stop hiding your true self from the world. Tell us all about that erotic fiction you're working on. And that kid's book.


              I answered it yesterday -- left it up for a few hours and you missed it!!! It was like a sneak preview of the answer that is so exciting I think most people already know what it is because they understood my point better than you did. You cheeky monkey? Is that a thing?

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: The Last 10 Days

                Originally posted by Bono View Post
                I answered it yesterday -- left it up for a few hours and you missed it!!! It was like a sneak preview of the answer that is so exciting I think most people already know what it is because they understood my point better than you did.
                As I said earlier, your "point" is perfectly clear and simple: always be writing. But surely you were surprised to learn from your pro-writer friend that doing that hadn't actually made them a better writer than someone who isn't?
                Know this: I'm a lazy amateur, so trust not a word what I write.
                "The ugly can be beautiful. The pretty, never." ~ Oscar Wilde

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: The Last 10 Days

                  No he wasn't saying that. He was trying to give me advice to write more scripts, calculate less and get stuff done.

                  You have to keep writing screenplays to get to a level where you can write screenplays that are at the pro level. At some point, yes I don't think you get better -- you just get to the point where you're capable of doing this.

                  It's not like Script 100 is better than Script 99. It's more like you have to write 20 scripts and if you have talent and drive you learn how to write the first real one on Script 21... and 22... and 23....

                  So he was saying -- I reached that level of writing ability. And no it's not like me and him are 100% equal - but that I joined the pro league in terms of talent in the skill of writing comedy screenplays. But what I wasn't doing was generating new material to try and sell. I was living in the past and bitching and making excuses. I can't sell talent -- I can only sell a spec. So I could even be a better comedy writer than the pro comedy writers -- but if they wrote 4 specs in 4 years and I wrote 0 -- guess who is going to have a better career? If they wrote 10 and I wrote 2... same thing...

                  Does that make more sense?

                  The same way an athlete works their way up to the pros.

                  In other words -- he's saying I AM A "PRO-READY" WRITER. I just haven't sold a spec yet like he did. And it's luck -- but also he gave himself more chances to sell material but writing more specs than I did. Way more.

                  Honestly, I got paid to write a script -- full WGA minimum -- the real deal through an agency. So I may even "technically" fit the definition of "pro" writer. But until I sell a spec of my own material -- I won't feel that way.

                  I sort of play my minor accomplishments down -- but I should also have some confidence in my talent based on past achievements. We all should.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: The Last 10 Days

                    Originally posted by Bono View Post
                    No he wasn't saying that. He was trying to give me advice to write more scripts, calculate less and get stuff done.

                    You have to keep writing screenplays to get to a level where you can write screenplays that are at the pro level. At some point, yes I don't think you get better -- you just get to the point where you're capable of doing this.

                    It's not like Script 100 is better than Script 99. It's more like you have to write 20 scripts and if you have talent and drive you learn how to write the first real one on Script 21... and 22... and 23....

                    So he was saying -- I reached that level of writing ability. And no it's not like me and him are 100% equal - but that I joined the pro league in terms of talent in the skill of writing comedy screenplays. But what I wasn't doing was generating new material to try and sell. I was living in the past and bitching and making excuses. I can't sell talent -- I can only sell a spec. So I could even be a better comedy writer than the pro comedy writers -- but if they wrote 4 specs in 4 years and I wrote 0 -- guess who is going to have a better career? If they wrote 10 and I wrote 2... same thing...

                    Does that make more sense?

                    The same way an athlete works their way up to the pros.

                    In other words -- he's saying I AM A "PRO-READY" WRITER. I just haven't sold a spec yet like he did. And it's luck -- but also he gave himself more chances to sell material but writing more specs than I did. Way more.

                    Honestly, I got paid to write a script -- full WGA minimum -- the real deal through an agency. So I may even "technically" fit the definition of "pro" writer. But until I sell a spec of my own material -- I won't feel that way.

                    I sort of play my minor accomplishments down -- but I should also have some confidence in my talent based on past achievements. We all should.
                    Good stuff. Thank you for posting. I get it. The past couple of years I've been way too constipated when it comes to writing, trying to get the four things I'm working on 'perfect' but you know where that goes. That's calculation.

                    I've posted this before, and I'll keep posting it. (See quote below.) I know these yahoos on Twitter who brag about writing a script a month and at the end of the year they have like 12 mediocre scripts -- I've read some of them. But they'll have the last laugh, because churning through twelve sets of mistakes is way more valuable than churning through my four projects twelve times looking for perfection. After 3-4 drafts of something, if it's not coming together, there are probably bigger conceptual/design issues with the idea that no amount of execution will fix. Turd polishing is turd polishing.

                    My goal is make 50 lb. of pots over the rest of 2020, not one perfect pot.

                    "PERFECTION The ceramics teacher announced on opening day that he was dividing the class into two groups. All those on the left side of the studio, he said, would be graded solely on the quantity of work they produced, all those on the right solely on its quality. His procedure was simple: on the final day of class he would bring in his bathroom scales and weigh the work of the "quantity- group: fifty pounds of pots rated an "A-, forty pounds a "B-, and so on. Those being graded on "quality-, however, needed to produce only one pot - albeit a perfect one - to get an "A-. Well, came grading time and a curious fact emerged: the works of highest quality were all produced by the group being graded for quantity. It seems that while the "quantity- group was busily churning out piles of work-and learning from their mistakes - the "quality- group had sat theorizing about perfection, and in the end had little more to show for their efforts than grandiose theories and a pile of dead clay.-
                    ― David Bayles, Art & Fear: Observations on the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: The Last 10 Days

                      Art & fear is great. But yes, you learn by doing. You always hear how doctors go to school for 8 years and on their first day of work they finally start to learn how to be a doctor. Like almost anything you learn by doing - not reading about others doing it.

                      I got 'calculate less" in my head from Brian Koppelman (Billions -- great resource on twitter -- six seconds vines).

                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mnc8o257Yzg don't watch all at once or you will go insane.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: The Last 10 Days

                        Originally posted by Bono View Post
                        Art & fear is great. But yes, you learn by doing. You always hear how doctors go to school for 8 years and on their first day of work they finally start to learn how to be a doctor. Like almost anything you learn by doing - not reading about others doing it.

                        I got 'calculate less" in my head from Brian Koppelman (Billions -- great resource on twitter -- six seconds vines).

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mnc8o257Yzg don't watch all at once or you will go insane.
                        I watched his Vines back when they were coming out. Only reason I had a Vine account. He's great. I listen to this podcast The Moment on the regular. This YouTube will be a good refresher -- in small doses.

                        More doing less talking/analyzing for me!

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: The Last 10 Days

                          Unfortunately for my writing, I am working 10-11 hour days on a full-time job that, coupled with the COVID-19 virus running amuck, has negatively impacted my ability to turn out pages.

                          I finished a draft of Tinder. I am tweaking the relationships between the main character and the main antagonist.

                          I am reworking the first act of The Devil's Elbow. Story here that might help others. When I was repped, I wrote this script. I really dig it. It's got a high concept but is a crime noir thriller, not an easy sell to those who are always looking for specifically "likable" characters.

                          It was not my manager's jam, (who was really interested in producing instead of managing me, I didn't realize that then), so I shelved it thinking that meant it just wasn't good enough. A writer friend of mine read it about a month or so ago, gave me notes and said if I rewrote the opening act and make some minor adjustments to the end, he felt it was a viable project. It's DOA meets Chinatown.

                          There's a lesson in that. Write for the industry and write for yourself.

                          So, I'm reworking the opening and doing a quick rewrite. Unfortunately, because of my work schedule I won't be able to have either of these ready for Austin, which I'm not entirely sold on anyway.

                          I have two ideas I've been researching. A contained feature thriller along the lines of Gravity meets Solaris. A concept where the beginning is the end and the end is the beginning, with character revelations similar to Source Code and Oblivion.

                          The other project is a dark (shocker) TV Series that has legs. Concept is commercial, just trying to determine if it will be more serialized for streamers or procedural for network. I need a strong pilot under my belt. I think I can achieve it with this concept.

                          It's along the lines of Evil meets The Sinner meets Hannibal.

                          Both of these projects are ambitious by way of structuring and character development. Kind of excited by them.

                          Looks like the next 10 will be similar. A struggle to wade through, for sure, but not giving up. I might have to switch from CNN in the background to "thunder storms."

                          Stay safe, everyone, and keep writing.
                          FA4
                          Last edited by finalact4; 05-31-2020, 09:41 AM.
                          "Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist,- Pablo Picasso

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: The Last 10 Days

                            Good sharing, Final Act! Inspires others to do the work.

                            And yes, please -- just put on music and shut off TV. Or at least put on movies or TV shows that are comfort food and you don't have to pay attention. Real news isn't going to help most of us. I can't write comedy with real life on fire in background. HGTV and FOOD NETWORK are still the best background noise channels.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: The Last 10 Days

                              ^The wife and I tried to watch Good Will Hunting last night but got distracted by all the riot/protest streams. Couldn't get back into it. Some absolutely batshit things going on. For the record, the video of Floyd dying was horrible. There's also clips going around of what I assume are fatalities from the past couple of nights. Some dude getting mangled under a semi, another getting beat to hell by a skateboard and people's feet, a guy trying to shoot people with a bow and then getting mobbed, a guy chasing people with a shotgun.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: The Last 10 Days

                                Originally posted by Bono View Post
                                No he wasn't saying that. He was trying to give me advice to write more scripts, calculate less and get stuff done.

                                You have to keep writing screenplays to get to a level where you can write screenplays that are at the pro level. At some point, yes I don't think you get better -- you just get to the point where you're capable of doing this.

                                It's not like Script 100 is better than Script 99. It's more like you have to write 20 scripts and if you have talent and drive you learn how to write the first real one on Script 21... and 22... and 23....

                                So he was saying -- I reached that level of writing ability. And no it's not like me and him are 100% equal - but that I joined the pro league in terms of talent in the skill of writing comedy screenplays. But what I wasn't doing was generating new material to try and sell. I was living in the past and bitching and making excuses. I can't sell talent -- I can only sell a spec. So I could even be a better comedy writer than the pro comedy writers -- but if they wrote 4 specs in 4 years and I wrote 0 -- guess who is going to have a better career? If they wrote 10 and I wrote 2... same thing...

                                Does that make more sense?

                                The same way an athlete works their way up to the pros.

                                In other words -- he's saying I AM A "PRO-READY" WRITER. I just haven't sold a spec yet like he did. And it's luck -- but also he gave himself more chances to sell material but writing more specs than I did. Way more.

                                Honestly, I got paid to write a script -- full WGA minimum -- the real deal through an agency. So I may even "technically" fit the definition of "pro" writer. But until I sell a spec of my own material -- I won't feel that way.

                                I sort of play my minor accomplishments down -- but I should also have some confidence in my talent based on past achievements. We all should.
                                Bono - Yes, I do see the advice that you say your pro-writer friend was trying give. It does indeed make sense. (To paraphrase it: Once a writer is writing at a professional level, having a greater amount of product to pitch will increase their chances of making a sale.)

                                However, within your pro-writer friend's statement is also their belief that having written significantly more than you, and consistently so for however long, has not made them a 'better' writer than you. Perhaps, qualitatively, they have plateaued, but you may yet go higher?
                                Know this: I'm a lazy amateur, so trust not a word what I write.
                                "The ugly can be beautiful. The pretty, never." ~ Oscar Wilde

                                Comment

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