High Concept vs New High Concept

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  • #16
    Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

    What happened to The Green Knight? Did covid **** that up? Don't know how good it'll be but the trailer was cool.

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    • #17
      Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

      Originally posted by sc111 View Post
      I was intrigued by the one about the woman convinced she would die the next day.

      Does everyone agree that's high concept? It would help to nail down a definition.
      A woman is convinced she will die the next day - and it turns out her fear is contagious, and spreads to people she comes in contact with.

      Contagious fear, and a built in clock (what happens tomorrow!?)? I think that's high concept. "A woman ponders her mortality" wouldn't be.

      Plus it's got a great title, which I think helps make something high concept. Joe gave the example of "Dude, Where's My Car?" being low concept - I disagree. First off, the title makes me laugh, and the logline - two stoners forget where they parked their car after a night of partying - is original, it tells you what the movie is quickly, it tells you what kind of comedy it is...

      If you think about it, "The Hangover" is really just an ensemble "Dude, Where's My Car?"

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      • #18
        Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

        Reading many of the threads lately -- I feel some writers on here try really really really hard to pretend they don't see the difference between high and low concept ideas. I honestly don't believe some people and think they are just trying to make some artsy fartsy point.

        If they really don't get the difference, after writing scripts for years and years, watching what sells, seeing the box office returns, then I'm 100% confused why they are still writing screenplays to sell to Hollywood.

        When I made the other thread, I thought this is probably stupid obvious point about taking time to choose the right idea and not just writing the first thing that pops into your mind -- but turns out it needed to be said.

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        • #19
          Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

          Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post
          A woman is convinced she will die the next day - and it turns out her fear is contagious, and spreads to people she comes in contact with.

          Contagious fear, and a built in clock (what happens tomorrow!?)? I think that's high concept. "A woman ponders her mortality" wouldn't be.

          Plus it's got a great title, which I think helps make something high concept. Joe gave the example of "Dude, Where's My Car?" being low concept - I disagree. First off, the title makes me laugh, and the logline - two stoners forget where they parked their car after a night of partying - is original, it tells you what the movie is quickly, it tells you what kind of comedy it is...

          If you think about it, "The Hangover" is really just an ensemble "Dude, Where's My Car?"
          Then we have our benchmark.
          Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. "Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.-

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          • #20
            Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

            Originally posted by Bono View Post
            Reading many of the threads lately -- I feel some writers on here try really really really hard to pretend they don't see the difference between high and low concept ideas. I honestly don't believe some people and think they are just trying to make some artsy fartsy point.

            If they really don't get the difference, after writing scripts for years and years, watching what sells, seeing the box office returns, then I'm 100% confused why they are still writing screenplays to sell to Hollywood.

            When I made the other thread, I thought this is probably stupid obvious point about taking time to choose the right idea and not just writing the first thing that pops into your mind -- but turns out it needed to be said.
            WTF?
            Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. "Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.-

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

              Originally posted by finalact4 View Post
              During COVID big tentpole studio fare will be a challenged to get into production, due to the potential for spreading infection. They'll work diligently on the ones that were already well into production when COVID hit, but new ones? Seems it might be wise to hold off on those until the virus is under better control.

              Which got me thinking about the vast middle that's basically disappeared in the past decade or so... perhaps that middle is more likely to emerge and entice filmmakers who want to get films made and can do it in a smaller, safer way.

              In that case, lower budget, contained, high concept scripts could potentially be the interim answer. Even as a way for studios to recover the huge losses they surely will experience this year.
              This seems logical. Let's hope you're correct and, as a result, more spec sales occur.
              “Nothing is what rocks dream about” ― Aristotle

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              • #22
                Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                Originally posted by Bono View Post
                Reading many of the threads lately -- I feel some writers on here try really really really hard to pretend they don't see the difference between high and low concept ideas. I honestly don't believe some people and think they are just trying to make some artsy fartsy point.

                If they really don't get the difference, after writing scripts for years and years, watching what sells, seeing the box office returns, then I'm 100% confused why they are still writing screenplays to sell to Hollywood.

                When I made the other thread, I thought this is probably stupid obvious point about taking time to choose the right idea and not just writing the first thing that pops into your mind -- but turns out it needed to be said.
                That sounds like me except I'm not literate enough to write anything artsy fartsy. Let me correct myself. I like and can do fartsy. Lots of fartsy.
                Until I can find a quote from Pope Francis regarding one licking one's butt in the Vatican I'll post this:
                Just One Scene - Contest #1

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                • #23
                  Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                  Originally posted by sc111 View Post
                  Then we have our benchmark.
                  LOL. Dude, Where's My Car is the Mendoza Line of concept.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                    Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post
                    LOL. Dude, Where's My Car is the Mendoza Line of concept.
                    Can we call it the Stuttering John Melendez Line as he makes a cameo in the closet?

                    Man I love that movie. Crap, I don't recall how it ends. I see Hal Sparks playing an alien.

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                    • #25
                      Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                      Originally posted by Mark Somers View Post
                      That sounds like me except I'm not literate enough to write anything artsy fartsy. Let me correct myself. I like and can do fartsy. Lots of fartsy.
                      You write good.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                        LOL. Dude, Where's My Car is the Mendoza Line of concept.
                        I've always wondered what the best way to describe that movie was. Now I know. Thank you for that.

                        Man I love that movie. Crap, I don't recall how it ends. I see Hal Sparks playing an alien.
                        It ends as any intelligently written film should. With the lead characters girlfriends' breasts doubling in size.

                        Hal Sparks was the cult leader. Somehow you unlocked an area deep inside my memory vault I didn't know I had, and now I suddenly remember that entire movie.

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                        • #27
                          Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                          But. Did. They. Ever. Find. Their. Car????

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                          • #28
                            Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                            Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post

                            Joe gave the example of "Dude, Where's My Car?" being low concept - I disagree.
                            No, I said it was an uninteresting concept. There's more on the concept spectrum than Low Concept and High Concept. In the past, I gave my opinion on what defines High Concept, which is the following:

                            A big hook that could be easily understood.

                            The story idea is unique, or it's familiar, but with a fresh hook/twist.

                            Universal appeal that demonstrates it has potential for commercial success.

                            To me, "Dude, Where's My Car" is an ordinary comedy concept, with stoner characters that we've seen before, and here's the hook -- can't remember where they parked their car. Wow!

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                            • #29
                              Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                              Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post

                              If you think about it, "The Hangover" is really just an ensemble "Dude, Where's My Car?"
                              Though, familiar with the waking up after a night of parting and not remembering where the groom is, the difference is, which makes this story idea more interesting, is the characters are not stoners, where something like this is expected.

                              They are responsible individuals. They lost a human being. Their close friend. Not a car that was not even demonstrated to be special. There is an urgency/time clock in finding this groom. The wedding hour is approaching and their good friend not making it on time could affect his future happiness. The stakes are high.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: High Concept vs New High Concept

                                Originally posted by JoeNYC View Post
                                No, I said it was an uninteresting concept. There's more on the concept spectrum than Low Concept and High Concept. In the past, I gave my opinion on what defines High Concept, which is the following:

                                A big hook that could be easily understood.

                                The story idea is unique, or it's familiar, but with a fresh hook/twist.

                                Universal appeal that demonstrates it has potential for commercial success.

                                To me, "Dude, Where's My Car" is an ordinary comedy concept, with stoner characters that we've seen before, and here's the hook -- can't remember where they parked their car. Wow!
                                Uninteresting or ordinary comedy concept = low concept no?

                                So I believe you are still saying it's not high concept even if you use different words.

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