First Ten Pages: What Readers Want

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Vango View Post

    In my opinion, I think you're a little mistaken, because a lot of doors to studios and prod companies have opened for me due to the prestige of the Nicholl/Academy -- without querying anyone. It really can be a career changing event, and would encourage you to apply if you're eligible. It is also validating, because your script is being voted on my academy members who are widely revered in the industry.
    No attack, just a correction as you've misunderstood what I was saying.

    I was referring to a tired/boring concept and how prodcos aren't going to suddenly change their mind about a concept just because of its success* in a competition. The asterik is because Joe defines success as simply progressing (ie: past the first round). I was referring to competitions in general and not just the big three (where even a QF doesn't mean too much) and so winning Screamfest, BlueCat, WeScreenplay and a host of others you've never heard of - let alone just 'progressing' in them - is not going to make anyone break down your door or change their mind about a formula they think is dead in the water. That's what I meant when I said the industry doesn't care about competitions. And even if your script Finaled Nicholl, if Hollywood doesn't feel it's marketable (and 99% of Nicholl finalists aren't) then it's not getting made.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by sundowninretreat View Post
      no attack, just a correction as you've misunderstood what i was saying.

      i was referring to a tired/boring concept and how prodcos aren't going to suddenly change their mind about a concept just because of its success* in a competition. The asterik is because joe defines success as simply progressing (ie: Past the first round). I was referring to competitions in general and not just the big three (where even a qf doesn't mean too much) and so winning screamfest, bluecat, wescreenplay and a host of others you've never heard of - let alone just 'progressing' in them - is not going to make anyone break down your door or change their mind about a formula they think is dead in the water. That's what i meant when i said the industry doesn't care about competitions. And even if your script finaled nicholl, if hollywood doesn't feel it's marketable (and 99% of nicholl finalists aren't) then it's not getting made.
      n o p e

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      • #48
        The broad and wild assumptions presented as facts are astounding.
        Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. "Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.-

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        • #49
          Originally posted by SundownInRetreat View Post

          winning Screamfest, BlueCat, WeScreenplay and a host of others you've never heard of - let alone just 'progressing' in them - is not going to make anyone break down your door or change their mind about a formula they think is dead in the water. That's what I meant when I said the industry doesn't care about competitions. And even if your script Finaled Nicholl, if Hollywood doesn't feel it's marketable (and 99% of Nicholl finalists aren't) then it's not getting made.
          Hamboogul won the BlueCat Screenplay Competition with a non-commercial screenplay and he's now a working professional in the industry. He said that the BlueCat win played a part in his success.

          So, SundownInRetreat, I suggest you stop making such sweeping accusations.

          Edited to add:

          To clarify about small and medium size contests: No, the industry is not paying attention to these contests. For advance writers, I would not recommend spending money on a small or medium size contest.

          The main reason a writer enters a contest is to get validation for his script to show the industry that it has been vetted and worth a read. The best way to achieve this is with the big competitions, such as, the Nicholl, Page, Austin. Mainly the Nicholl.

          With that said, there are valid reasons for a writer to enter a small or medium size contest:

          A new writer wants to get an idea on how his writing stands up/competes against his peers who are at the same level of development as them. I remember when I entered my first completed screenplay into a medium size competition and it advanced. Oh man, I was flying high. This gave me great confidence. This told me I just might have something. This showing gave me the hope and persistence to continue in the face of all the rejection that came after.

          Some of these medium size contests work hard to obtain a manager for their winners.

          A small or medium size contest may have an industry judge that's a perfect fit for a writer's screenplay.

          Some small and medium size contests offer free feedback and a new writer may want to get a judges' impressions on his writing/screenplay.

          SundownInRetreat had shown a lot of negativity, so I just wanted to put another view out there because writers are not unoriginal clones. We are all unique with different needs and wants. What might not be a good road for one writer doesn't mean it will not be a good road for someone else.
          Last edited by JoeNYC; 10-17-2020, 04:24 AM.

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          • #50
            Originally posted by JoeNYC View Post

            He said that the BlueCat win played a part in his success.
            My recollection is that Hamboogul got his break on the back of recognition and validation elsewhere. 'Playing a part' is so non-specific as to not counter what I said. Had he said it was integral in opening doors (he didn't) then even that would only make him an outlier so my comment stands.

            To clarify about small and medium size contests: No, the industry is not paying attention to these contests.
            In other words you're agreeing with what I said.
            Which has also been stated by the industry pros and players,

            SundownInRetreat had shown a lot of negativity
            I told it like it is. As Jeff did about the difficulty in making a TV career. That you want to disregard it 'cause it disrupts the 'logic' of your plan to break in is your issue. You wanna disagree and continue your wholesale pattern of repeatedly dismissing pro advice? Go for it, makes no odds to me.

            I suggest you stop making such sweeping accusations.
            I suggest you actually post an opposite stance to me rather than posting digs that fail to mask your agreement.
            I also suggest you understand that a lion doesn't care about the opinions of sheep.

            .
            Last edited by SundownInRetreat; 10-17-2020, 04:48 PM.

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            • #51
              Vango says:

              "...a lot of doors to studios and prod companies have opened for me due to the prestige of the Nicholl/Academy -- without querying anyone."

              This is direct proof studios and prodcos DO pay attention to Nicholl winners. Do they rush to purchase the winning script? Rarely. However they rush to connect with the writer.

              They're looking for fresh voices they can consider for assignments. Which is the lion's share of writing work in the industry.

              Whether you enter contests or not, a spec script is an advertisement for your writing skills.

              That's why the first 10 pages are so important (the topic of the thread).
              Advice from writer, Kelly Sue DeConnick. "Try this: if you can replace your female character with a sexy lamp and the story still basically works, maybe you need another draft.-

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