Should I write Pilot Episode

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  • Otuken
    replied
    Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post

    Otuken, I've been a professional TV writer/producer/showrunner for more than 25 years. Barry is giving you bad advice. Polish your logline and use that to query, and if they like it they'll request the script.
    Thank you for the feedback.

    Leave a comment:


  • JeffLowell
    replied
    Originally posted by Barry John View Post
    * Market your pitch doc or series bible. It's more informative and shorter to read than your pilot. If they like it? They'll request you to send the pilot script.
    Otuken, I've been a professional TV writer/producer/showrunner for more than 25 years. Barry is giving you bad advice. Polish your logline and use that to query, and if they like it they'll request the script.

    Leave a comment:


  • Satriales
    replied
    Originally posted by Barry John View Post
    Otuken, in general, and I say generally because unlike writing features and the manner in which we go about marketing it is different from TV Pilot - series/episodic.
    - A feature concludes. It's written with a plot in mind. A pilot is but the beginning of a long-running series and will conclude with a hook.
    - Your pilot is the set up to your series - and not the series. The entire series will run off the premise, world, and characters you create. As series are mainly character-driven, and we going to spend so much time with them, the character set is of most importance. Their back story too, as it's important to understand where they came from to understand why they are driven to get where they want to. In most cases, this will be the core of the series - the obstacles, struggles, emotions, they need to overcome.
    - Cooper said it well: Well, unless you're a proven, produced, established television/screenwriter, your idea for a series is just another undeveloped idea from someone who hasn't demonstrated he/she can write anything whatsoever. A killer pilot, along with a detailed series treatment sells the series.
    - Accompanying your pilot must be a well-written pitch doc (normally for episodes) or a series bible. In either, you going to want to write (tell) a short synopsis for about the first season, and be sure each flows one into the next - move the story forward.

    * Market your pitch doc or series bible. It's more informative and shorter to read than your pilot. If they like it? They'll request you to send the pilot script.

    All the best forward.
    If you pilot only CONCLUDES with the hook, you are doing it wrong. That needs to be very early, especially as an unproven writer. I'm talking first X number of pages early.

    Also, this is bad advice "As series are mainly character-driven" because, IMO, EVERYTHING is character driven. If it ISN'T character driven, I don't think it will work at a professional level.

    Leave a comment:


  • Otuken
    replied
    Thank you for the information.

    I have the logline, the pilot script and synopsis of season 1 should I really create a tv bible too? I've read tv bible is unnecessary or I should never share it with any producer before any agreement how true is that?

    Leave a comment:


  • Barry John
    replied
    Otuken, in general, and I say generally because unlike writing features and the manner in which we go about marketing it is different from TV Pilot - series/episodic.
    - A feature concludes. It's written with a plot in mind. A pilot is but the beginning of a long-running series and will conclude with a hook.
    - Your pilot is the set up to your series - and not the series. The entire series will run off the premise, world, and characters you create. As series are mainly character-driven, and we going to spend so much time with them, the character set is of most importance. Their back story too, as it's important to understand where they came from to understand why they are driven to get where they want to. In most cases, this will be the core of the series - the obstacles, struggles, emotions, they need to overcome.
    - Cooper said it well: Well, unless you're a proven, produced, established television/screenwriter, your idea for a series is just another undeveloped idea from someone who hasn't demonstrated he/she can write anything whatsoever. A killer pilot, along with a detailed series treatment sells the series.
    - Accompanying your pilot must be a well-written pitch doc (normally for episodes) or a series bible. In either, you going to want to write (tell) a short synopsis for about the first season, and be sure each flows one into the next - move the story forward.

    * Market your pitch doc or series bible. It's more informative and shorter to read than your pilot. If they like it? They'll request you to send the pilot script.

    All the best forward.

    Leave a comment:


  • Otuken
    replied
    Yes the pilot episode is ready and I am considering to participate shorescripts and/or zoetrope.

    By the way I am sorry for my emotional response.

    Leave a comment:


  • dpaterso
    replied
    Originally posted by Otuken View Post
    Some sources say writing a pilot episode is meaningless since it undermines flexibility and producers will already have to change drastically hence it is better to write just summaries of every episodes in season 1 what do you think?
    Have you already written the script? If so, maybe search for "tv script contests 2021" and see if you like any of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Clint Hill
    replied
    Originally posted by Otuken View Post
    Some sources say writing a pilot episode is meaningless since it undermines flexibility and producers will already have to change drastically hence it is better to write just summaries of every episodes in season 1 what do you think?
    Question those questionable sources about that first comment. Anyone could take those uncopyrighted summaries and twist them myriad ways into viable screen stories in the form of a copyrighted script.

    If you submitted summaries, how would anyone know if you're able to write the script? Why would they believe you could
    Last edited by Clint Hill; 07-19-2021, 04:56 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • finalact4
    replied
    Time is money, Otuken, and you need to either get on board with the way the industry works or move on to something else. T

    Industry professionals expect you to respect their time and follow their querying policies. Some managers receive hundreds of submissions; they simply don't have time to read them all. They have active clients' work they need to read, give notes on, send out, follow up on their progress, as well as deal with projects in production. THOSE are their priorities. They simply do not have the extra time to devote to read hundreds of poorly written, underdeveloped, terribly executed stories.

    It is NOT complicated.

    Send a compelling query letter with a compelling logline that is undeniably amazing, and someone who likes it will reach out to you. Submit your work to contests and take first place. Submit your work to The Black List and earn 9s &10s.

    You have a choice. Stop whining and complaining about why YOU deserve anyone's 30 seconds, and focus your energy on what YOU CAN CONTROL... the writing. Then write the best, show-stopping script ever written. Do that, any you'll earn everyone's attention.

    If you'd rather continue to complain about why the system is unfair and how you're getting a raw deal, that's as far as you will ever get.

    This industry is not for the feint of heart. It's not for complainers. You have to be bold. Persevere. Relentlessly pursue your passion. Regardless of fear. Regardless of rejection. Regardless of how difficult.

    These are truisms.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cooper
    replied
    Originally posted by Otuken View Post
    I can't understand the aspect of uncertainty and tendency of overcomplicate things in this industry.

    I just should have been allowed (like others) to send my logline and season 1 synopsis directly. They could just drop off reading if they don't like logline which wouldn't take more than few seconds. If not even bothering to read it then what do they expect from no name writers?
    They expect them to win significant contests or go away as they already have plenty of working writers on their roster and they don't need a bunch of wannabes tugging on their coattails like beggars at the banquet. Harsh, but they're really not looking to fill empty seats.

    Proverbial Hollywood does not favor the untried or unproven.

    Besides, you can query your logline to 10,000 people -- nobody's stopping you. Whether anyone reads it and requests material is a different story.

    Leave a comment:


  • Otuken
    replied
    I can't understand the aspect of uncertainty and tendency of overcomplicate things in this industry.

    I just should have been allowed (like others) to send my logline and season 1 synopsis directly. They could just drop off reading if they don't like logline which wouldn't take more than few seconds. If not even bothering to read it then what do they expect from no name writers?

    Leave a comment:


  • finalact4
    replied
    Originally posted by Otuken View Post

    Unfortunately I don't live in US, even English is not my first language but becoming a script writer in US or Europe has always been my primary life goal. Has anyone with similar situation to me ever became scrpit writer in US?

    Yes, of course they have.

    I moved to LA at the end of last September and I'm in the same boat until I secure a rep. I have only recently been able to start working on writing again, because my day job is demanding (60-70 hour weeks are common).

    When I speak to "a way in the room," I'm talking about having a team of representatives (manager and agent). A lot of writers are in your shoes. If you do not have reps that can get you a face-to-face, you will need to write a high quality pilot and possibly have additional documents written as well, ie a pitch, bible, some kind of series breakdown. Enter contests, query producers and managers, everything everyone suggests on this site. It doesn't really matter where you live at this point. It's just more challenging to get attention. If you write an amazing pilot and you get attention for it, you have a chance.

    You can check out The Black List website and review some of the TV pilots writers are trying to sell. You'll get a good idea of what you might want to have. They may even allow you to read their pilots and other docs.

    Keeo asking questions. Keep writing. Keep the drive alive...

    Leave a comment:


  • Otuken
    replied
    Originally posted by finalact4 View Post
    If you don't have a way into the room to pitch your project, you will have to write your pilot episode. The pilot episode needs to be of the highest quality. The party interested in buying the project will ultimately decide what will be the actual pilot episode they want to send into production. Producers/network/studio may opt for a different access point into the series and request a new pilot.

    When the pilot is your way into the room, it's a selling document that speaks for itself. It must sell the series.
    Unfortunately I don't live in US, even English is not my first language but becoming a script writer in US or Europe has always been my primary life goal. Has anyone with similar situation to me ever became scrpit writer in US?


    Leave a comment:


  • finalact4
    replied
    If you don't have a way into the room to pitch your project, you will have to write your pilot episode. The pilot episode needs to be of the highest quality. The party interested in buying the project will ultimately decide what will be the actual pilot episode they want to send into production. Producers/network/studio may opt for a different access point into the series and request a new pilot.

    When the pilot is your way into the room, it's a selling document that speaks for itself. It must sell the series.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cooper
    replied
    Well, unless you're a proven, produced, established television/screenwriter, your idea for a series is just another undeveloped idea from someone who hasn't demonstrated he/she can write anything whatsoever. A killer pilot, along with a detailed series treatment sells the series.

    Leave a comment:

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