Question About Cutting Ties With Manager

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  • MargoChanning
    replied
    Thanks so much f4. I think I'll do that!

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  • finalact4
    replied
    Yes, as Will said, they are reading and have been throughout COVID. I had an option offer with a company to get Tinder Sweet 16 made this past September. As it turned out there were some aspects my lawyer and I could not agree to, and thank God, because I started a new job and haven't been able to get writing done-- I would have been in breach of the contract the first week. haha. Anyway, good luck on getting a new manager.

    The prodco found it on the Black List 2.0 website. That's a good place to post your script and its reviews. You can leave off your manager's name and maybe you can drum up interest from other managers, who knows? Industry people still use the site and are still actively looking for material as far as I've heard. Comedies coming out of COVID were of interest-- at least that's what I was told.

    Good luck, Margo. Let us know how things turn out.

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  • MargoChanning
    replied
    Thanks very much for the info, Will.

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  • Done Deal Pro
    replied
    Hollywood is reading, optioning and buying scripts. Most certainly. But as usual, it is generally more from established writers whose reps have brought the script in or it's going out as a package with producers attached, etc.

    We're just a little over half-way through this month and even with the holidays, we've still listed 25 film (four were specs) and 55 TV deals so far. The spec heyday is basically long gone and will probably not ever return, but people are reading and doing some stuff. It'll surely pick up a bit more once more vaccines get out and things get under control. Working from home doesn't stop reading just production in many cases.
    Last edited by Done Deal Pro; 01-19-2021, 04:42 PM.

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  • MargoChanning
    replied
    Jeff, thanks so much to both you and FinalAct. You're two of the people who keep me coming back here. Yes, as FA. said, this is a tough time, indeed. But tomorrow, Trump gets the hell out of Dodge and hopefully, brighter days are ahead.

    What I'm curious about: Is Hollywood even reading scripts now? Or are screenwriters spinning their wheels trying to get noticed? It's difficult when you know in your bones you have something good and can't get it out there. But that said, I've lasted this long. ;-

    I appreciate your feedback, truly.

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  • JeffLowell
    replied
    Margo, I'd tell the director that you're looking for a new rep and see if he has any recommendations.

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  • finalact4
    replied
    Good to hear from you. It's a tough time, right? Good luck with your project. Things will work out.

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  • MargoChanning
    replied
    Originally posted by finalact4 View Post
    So, Margo, what did you decide? Has it worked out? or are you still working on it?
    Hey, F4, sorry I kind of fell off the grid. I'm still working on it, which means, I haven't heard from her and she hasn't heard from me. Her position is that we need to get talent attached to the script she's pitching. Or not pitching. I'm sick of that bullshit, frankly. I have a director on board and now I have to attach talent, as well? As she never checks in with me, I figure she's really not doing anything. But that said, if I had a decent rep interested, I'd have no problem telling her that we need to part ways. And thank you for asking!

    Leave a comment:


  • finalact4
    replied
    So, Margo, what did you decide? Has it worked out? or are you still working on it?

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  • MargoChanning
    replied
    Wow. You guys are awesome. I think I got it now. Do my thing and deal with "what if?" if it comes up. Jeff, you made an excellent point that if I get a lead on my own, I'll probably need my rep to submit. This has happened to me several times, already. I'm gonna roll the dice and see where it lands. Thanks so much to all.

    Leave a comment:


  • finalact4
    replied
    Good advice, Jeff.

    Some people dread confrontation, so being prepared for multiple situations by having a response places you in control of the conversation regardless of who is on the receiving end, the new manager, or the old one. It may even provide a level of confidence that solidifies your choice. And you never know, not a single one of the "what ifs" may ever arise.

    Good luck, MargoChanning.

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  • JeffLowell
    replied
    All YMMV:

    What if the person you're leaving heard from someone else that you were shopping for a new manager?

    Then you're exactly where you were if you fired the person. Or maybe in a better position - maybe they fight to keep your business.

    What if the new manager realizes, or worse hears from someone else, that you haven't parted ways with your previous manager before soliciting them?

    I pitch being aboveboard. When I've done this, I always said "I'm with so and so, but I'm looking for new representation." If they ask why, it's the same answer as if they ask why you left your last manager. Tell them why the relationship isn't working out. And FWIW, I've never had a manager or agent say "I can't talk to you while you're represented." And I've been lucky enough to only talk to larger, legit agents/managers for a long time.

    What if that concerned the new prospective manager that you might do the same to them?

    They might work harder than your last rep? There's a lot of fear of reps that run through these threads. They work for you. It's not weird to fire them if they're not doing their job. And every rep knows there might come a day when they're fired.

    This isn't a spouse. You're not "cheating" if you're considering other options. Reps take on new clients and then fire old ones all the time. Producers interview new writers for features and TV shows while they've got someone currently working for them. They do it because they don't want to be without a writer - if they can upgrade, they will, if they can't, they'll stick with you while they're looking.

    What if that manager asked you, "Why are you shopping for a new manager when you haven't left your old one? Can you answer that in a way where you don't look like a dick? Maybe they won't care. What if they do?

    Is it really different than the process when you're choosing between multiple reps? You tell the first one "thanks for the offer - this sounds awesome - I need to talk to the other reps and I'll make my decision quickly."

    I go back to my bottom line: an inefficient rep is *usually* better than no rep at all. At the very least, if you get a lead on your own, you can have your rep send it over. Even the worst rep will have their assistant send an email for the chance of a commission.

    A lot of people won't read scripts that don't come through an agent or a manager - there are legal complications, and it's also just a very easy way to screen out 99% of submissions so they're not overwhelmed.

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  • MargoChanning
    replied
    Originally posted by AnyOtherName View Post
    Unlike agents, many managers subscribe to anti-poaching ethics and won't read you if you're still with somebody else, so be aware of that.

    (Personally, I think "anti-poaching ethics" are anti-competitive, collusive business practices whose chief effect is to disincentivize writers from leaving bad reps, but sadly, my opinion on the matter doesn't change the reality of the situation.)

    Morally, I don't think there's anything remotely wrong with scoping out new reps before firing your old rep, and in fact, I think you'd be crazy not to. But you should probably exercise some amount of discretion in your search (i.e., don't just blatantly start querying new reps).

    Hope this helps!
    Thanks so much. What do you mean by not "blatantly querying new reps?" I either query them or I don't. ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • MargoChanning
    replied
    Thanks for the great info, everybody. I'm thinking there's a lot to be said for finalact4's "what if?" scenario. I'm leaning towards letting go of her before I do anything else.

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  • AnyOtherName
    replied
    Unlike agents, many managers subscribe to anti-poaching ethics and won't read you if you're still with somebody else, so be aware of that.

    (Personally, I think "anti-poaching ethics" are anti-competitive, collusive business practices whose chief effect is to disincentivize writers from leaving bad reps, but sadly, my opinion on the matter doesn't change the reality of the situation.)

    Morally, I don't think there's anything remotely wrong with scoping out new reps before firing your old rep, and in fact, I think you'd be crazy not to. But you should probably exercise some amount of discretion in your search (i.e., don't just blatantly start querying new reps).

    Hope this helps!

    Leave a comment:

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