Questions about finding the correct managers

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  • Questions about finding the correct managers

    I am looking the writers of the recent teen dramas and their representatives in IMDBPro to send my query letter tho the correct people. I come across that some of them are represented by talent agents. I am new at IMBDPro and I was expecting to see all writer's screenwriting managers.

    Am I using the site correctly? Is there any alternaive ways to find out the correct managers? Should I send query letter to talent agents too? Any other advices?

    Thanks.

  • #2

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    • #3
      If I don't know they accept unsolicided query letter, is it acceptable to send them query letter? Should I include only the logline?

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      • #4

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        • #5
          Should I send query letters to managers of directors too?

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          • #6
            I would just stick to managers / agents / producers.

            For a TV pilot I don't think getting it to a TV director would lead to much -- but I'm sure it's happened. In Film a director can surely attach and take it up the ladder. But in TV, I feel most of them are hired very late in the game as they come in, shoot for a few days and move on to the next project. TV moves fast.



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            • #7
              Meaningful directors don't just come in and out - they're attached as executive producers and often direct many of the episodes. They have development deals at studios / networks just like writers, and they need material. For example, Mark Mylod is an exec producer on Succession and has directed 10 episode, and he's got a deal (on HBO I think?).

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              • #8
                I knew if I played dumb and talked out of my ass while avoiding my real life problems, Jeff would come out of the woodwork and give us the info we needed.

                Still that seems like a huge longshot from unrepped writer, no?

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                • #9
                  What isn't?

                  When I was breaking in, I sent out literally thousands of letters. I can trace my entire career through one of those letters to a stranger.

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                  • #10
                    I just did a quick search, and I never told the story here. Since no one asked:

                    I sent a query letter to a mid-level producer on a television show, whose name I saw in the credits. (I sent letters to every writer's name I found on every television show on the air.) He didn't get many queries, since he couldn't hire anyone, so he politely called and answered a few questions I had, and then offered to read a script.

                    He liked it enough to send to his agent. His agent passed, but the agent's assistant kept it. He was hired by a different agency as an agent, and called and offered to rep me. He threw a party for all of his clients, and I met another writer who hadn't broken in yet, but she worked as a writers assistant on shows. (I'd never had any kind of industry job at this point.) I told her I'd love to do that. She got called and offered a writers assistant job, but was already working as one, so she recommended me. She told me to lie and say I'd done it before. I did. They hired me. I met with the woman who got me the job, and she gave me a half hour lesson on how to use Final Draft. (I had written twenty plus scripts on Microsoft Word before that.)

                    I muddled through the job, and a young writing team got to know me well enough to think I was funny. When the show got canceled, they were offered a job on The George Carlin Show. They were also offered a job on Seinfeld. They took Seinfeld, but recommended me to the showrunner on George Carlin He read my script, called me in and let me write a freelance episode. He hired me the day I turned in the draft.

                    All of that because I wrote a letter to a stranger who didn't have the power to hire me.

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                    • #11
                      Okay Jeff that's awesome. I recall you saying how an agent's assistant became your agent but not the whole story. It's nice to humanize the pro writers and realize you are just like us!

                      But see you wrote 20 plus scripts before say the last one 21 got you repped. It was NOT only because you wrote a letter to a stranger, but that you were funny and a put in the work as a writer.

                      I agree with the hustle. I've just been trying to say to all unrepped writers just make sure you've proven to yourself that your work is good enough so if you do get lucky with emails to strangers, your work can back up your hustle.

                      Talent plus Hustle. Not just hustle. But yes of course, hustle alone sometimes works just fine.

                      My first "big break" was I sent an email query on a Sunday to a big comedy producer and instantly asked for spec and 2 hours later offered to option it.But if I sent him the good spec I wrote before the one I queried with nothing would have happened. I was good, but I still had to develop better material as a writer. I did well in contests, so that gave me confidence to push the material to strangers like reps and producers.

                      It was great spec plus email to a stranger that made it work.

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                      • #12
                        Of course. I'm always preaching the importance of always producing new material, developing a voice, coming up with concepts that get people's attention... But with all of that, I queried the same script that broke me to thousands of other people with no result.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post
                          I just did a quick search, and I never told the story here. Since no one asked:

                          I sent a query letter to a mid-level producer on a television show, whose name I saw in the credits. (I sent letters to every writer's name I found on every television show on the air.) He didn't get many queries, since he couldn't hire anyone, so he politely called and answered a few questions I had, and then offered to read a script.

                          He liked it enough to send to his agent. His agent passed, but the agent's assistant kept it. He was hired by a different agency as an agent, and called and offered to rep me. He threw a party for all of his clients, and I met another writer who hadn't broken in yet, but she worked as a writers assistant on shows. (I'd never had any kind of industry job at this point.) I told her I'd love to do that. She got called and offered a writers assistant job, but was already working as one, so she recommended me. She told me to lie and say I'd done it before. I did. They hired me. I met with the woman who got me the job, and she gave me a half hour lesson on how to use Final Draft. (I had written twenty plus scripts on Microsoft Word before that.)

                          I muddled through the job, and a young writing team got to know me well enough to think I was funny. When the show got canceled, they were offered a job on The George Carlin Show. They were also offered a job on Seinfeld. They took Seinfeld, but recommended me to the showrunner on George Carlin He read my script, called me in and let me write a freelance episode. He hired me the day I turned in the draft.

                          All of that because I wrote a letter to a stranger who didn't have the power to hire me.
                          Great story. Thanks for sharing.
                          "Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist,- Pablo Picasso

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JeffLowell View Post
                            Of course. I'm always preaching the importance of always producing new material, developing a voice, coming up with concepts that get people's attention... But with all of that, I queried the same script that broke me to thousands of other people with no result.
                            Was that the feature spec you mentioned in some previous post that I believe had to do with killing an agent? Maybe I made that up. Just curious what idea got you in the door. Just curious if a feature lead you to TV. It sounds for sure that it was an original piece of material and not spec of a TV show.

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                            • #15
                              I broke in in TV, with a spec episode of "The Larry Sanders Show." The black industry comedy screenplay is what got me all my work in features in the beginning. I had to break in twice, Bono! These kids today just hop back and forth, but in my day, I tells ya, feature people didn't give a **** about TV writers.

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