Approaching agents/managers

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  • #16
    Re: Approaching agents/managers

    Originally posted by muckraker View Post
    It's the new normal for the writer to receive no response, ever, if they pass on your script.

    If you haven't sent a follow-up yet to check in, still not too late to do so in case they just forgot or set it aside. That unfortunately is about all you can do to "nudge" anyone.
    There used to be a quick "It's not for us, here's a made up one sentence reason so we can feel ok about rejecting you" note that could come as much as six months after they requested it. Then, I guess, they felt ok without sending the note because as has been said, no news is bad news. Just like an actor auditioning for a role, if you get the part you hear. If you don't, crickets. So, learn to send and forget. Three weeks or so, a reminder, then let it go completely. If it makes you feel any better, one time I heard back five months later with an option offer. I'd forgotten all about it, too. Since 98% of submissions are an outright pass anyway, send and forget. Better for your mental health.

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    • #17
      Re: Approaching agents/managers

      like that, EdFury. especially the option offer part. one can only guess what woke them up. did your script suddenly hit the zeitgeist sweet spot? or maybe they just finally got around to reading it? thank you.

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      • #18
        Re: Approaching agents/managers

        Originally posted by nostromo View Post

        Is it possible for a new screenwriter not residing in the US to find representation?

        Thanks beforehand.
        Yup, I've done it. I'm in Canada. Good luck!

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        • #19
          Re: Approaching agents/managers

          Originally posted by EdFury View Post
          ...If it makes you feel any better, one time I heard back five months later with an option offer. I'd forgotten all about it, too. Since 98% of submissions are an outright pass anyway, send and forget. Better for your mental health.
          My record for a response was on an InkTip lead for their preferred newsletter, where you send a query and full synopsis: 635 days. (I have a day-counter on my database)

          Of course, some read requests have NEVER been responded to, follow-up or not. Meanwhile, that darned day-counter just keeps on going: I have one at 2802 days and two more coming right up behind at 2800 and 2799. (Of course, that means that over two days I had three read requests, way way back then. Not bad. Don't get too many two-days like that anymore.)

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          • #20
            Re: Approaching agents/managers

            Originally posted by jonbbb1 View Post
            like that, EdFury. especially the option offer part. one can only guess what woke them up. did your script suddenly hit the zeitgeist sweet spot? or maybe they just finally got around to reading it? thank you.
            My guess is it kept getting shuffled to the bottom of the pile until someone finally read it. Happens. It never did get get made and went back in my two foot tall stack of unmade specs. And will stay until I get asked for a "true sports story" again. Then I'll have it.

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            • #21
              Re: Approaching agents/managers

              Originally posted by EdFury View Post
              And will stay until I get asked for a "true sports story" again. Then I'll have it.
              In the past year I've seen a couple of those on the InkTip preferred newsletter. I have a fun fictional sports story that couldn't go out, because the lead called for 'true story'.

              Even when I've pitched mine elsewhere, I've had multiple responses of "Why make yours, when there are so many 'true' inspirational sports stories out there?"

              Well, I guess we can throw Rocky and Karate Kid (and all their sequels) out the window, then.

              Best of luck with yours, though. I hope it sees the light of day before somebody else finds the underlying 'true story' and writes a spec that beats yours to the Studios.

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              • #22
                Re: Approaching agents/managers

                Originally posted by catcon View Post
                Best of luck with yours, though. I hope it sees the light of day before somebody else finds the underlying 'true story' and writes a spec that beats yours to the Studios.
                Except I wrote the script with the person it's about and because he's my co-author and we have a written agreement, we have the life rights. Going to be tough to get around that. No, this'll see the light of day at some point. It's a great story.

                If you're going to write a "true story" you need to get the rights, otherwise it an exercise in futility 99% of the time. I don't work on any spec project without a cleared path to sale.

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                • #23
                  Re: Approaching agents/managers

                  Originally posted by EdFury View Post
                  ...I don't work on any spec project without a cleared path to sale.
                  A lesson for us all.

                  Then there are specs based on true-story "events", even if with fictional characters (eg. Cameron's Titanic and many others). I've done a couple of those (under- or non-reported events) and there's always a risk of being beaten to the punch or having to compete against different takes on such "based upon" stories.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Approaching agents/managers

                    Originally posted by EdFury View Post
                    Except I wrote the script with the person it's about and because he's my co-author and we have a written agreement, we have the life rights. Going to be tough to get around that. No, this'll see the light of day at some point. It's a great story.

                    If you're going to write a "true story" you need to get the rights, otherwise it an exercise in futility 99% of the time. I don't work on any spec project without a cleared path to sale.
                    I disagree.

                    If your "true story" script is great and gets on the Black List and gets you a lot of work, it's not an "exercise in futility," whether or not there's a "clear path to sale."

                    It's been said before, but it bears repeating: 95% of the function of a spec script is to serve as writing sample. If your script is (perceived as being) great, it will serve that function, whether or not you have the life rights, whether or not it sells.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Approaching agents/managers

                      interesting situation. the topic of my script is featured in a tv documentary airing soon. is it too pushy to mention this to managers and producers who have have my script but supposedly haven't read it yet? i just want to send a short email saying something like "hey, the topic of this script, which has flown under the radar for a while, is suddenly becoming part of public conversation..."

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                      • #26
                        Re: Approaching agents/managers

                        Originally posted by jonbbb1 View Post
                        interesting situation. the topic of my script is featured in a tv documentary airing soon. is it too pushy to mention this to managers and producers who have have my script but supposedly haven't read it yet? i just want to send a short email saying something like "hey, the topic of this script, which has flown under the radar for a while, is suddenly becoming part of public conversation..."
                        Go for it. There's nothing wrong with fanning embers in hope of igniting a flame!

                        You don't want to be spammy, but you also don't want to be silent when there's project-centric information to share.

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