Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

    I queried several managers with a script I received a 93/100 score on from WeScreenplay, and three of them rather quickly requested the full script.
    • One, I submitted in December (followed up recently, he said he hadn't gotten to it yet, as I'm an "unknown and therefore not a priority" *wow*)
    • One, I submitted three weeks ago (wrote a follow-up email, no response)
    • One, I submitted two weeks ago today (haven't followed up)


    My question is: in this situation, how often do managers make it a point to get back to you, even if it's a pass? Such as to just let you know they're not interested, or even to give you some feedback as to how it could be improved?

    Should I just wait for the third guy to respond on his own? I worry I may have irritated the first two - even though it was just "Hi! Just checking in to see if you've had a chance to look over the script I submitted and might have any feedback on it? Thanks!"

    I know they're crazy-busy. I just wonder how many actually respond on their own after a full read request? The last guy is one of the owners of a larger management company (LINK Entertainment) and said he was going to share with his "lit. dept," so I figure that might take longer than two weeks.

    Thanks for helping to quell my nerves, folks. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
    - Skunk
    Last edited by Cokeyskunk; 03-26-2019, 08:40 AM.

  • #2
    Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

    You waited the appropriate amount of time. General rule of thumb is 2 + weeks.

    That being said, the other general rule is that if they don't respond to your follow up, or they respond with something dickish like that first manager, consider them not interested and move on.

    I've been there before. Got a read request from an agent whose client roster I really admire, a month later I followed up and he asked for me to resend my samples (even though this was all on the same email thread), and a little over a month later I followed up again but never heard back. Really pained me but just reminded myself that there are plenty of fish in the sea and moved on ...

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

      Well, I'm glad I'm not breaking protocol by following-up too early.

      But again, is it the NORM to respond after a full read request, regardless of the decision -- or is it the norm for them to never respond again if it's a pass?

      Also, if they're interested after reading your script (and all communications up to this point have been through email) it is more common for them to reach out favorably through email again, or do they usually give you a call?

      TIA,
      - Skunk

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

        Originally posted by Cokeyskunk View Post
        Well, I'm glad I'm not breaking protocol by following-up too early.

        But again, is it the NORM to respond after a full read request, regardless of the decision -- or is it the norm for them to never respond again if it's a pass?

        Also, if they're interested after reading your script (and all communications up to this point have been through email) it is more common for them to reach out favorably through email again, or do they usually give you a call?

        TIA,
        - Skunk
        most will respond with a pass and some nice words of encouragement, eventually. some you may never hear from again. some may say, reach out on your next script, some may not.

        if they are interested in repping you they will call and email. that's been my limited experience.
        Last edited by finalact4; 03-27-2019, 04:48 PM.
        "Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist,- Pablo Picasso

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

          About half of my reads get responded to without following up. 2 weeks is definitely not the rule of thumb. I wait 6-8 weeks before following up and I've never had anyone get snarky about it.
          Eric
          www.scriptreadguaranteed.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

            Originally posted by harbak View Post
            About half of my reads get responded to without following up. 2 weeks is definitely not the rule of thumb. I wait 6-8 weeks before following up and I've never had anyone get snarky about it.
            Okay, good to know. I got an enthusiastic read request, and that was a little over two weeks ago. I have not yet followed up with him, so I'll wait until the end of April-ish to follow up.

            But hopefully, I'll hear from him before then!
            Last edited by Cokeyskunk; 03-27-2019, 01:21 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

              If I were a manager, asked to read a script and then saw my name in a forum, I would quickly take advantage of the circular file.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

                Originally posted by jmpowell7 View Post
                If I were a manager, asked to read a script and then saw my name in a forum, I would quickly take advantage of the circular file.
                Good point. Remedied.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

                  Originally posted by JS90 View Post
                  You waited the appropriate amount of time. General rule of thumb is 2 + weeks.

                  That being said, the other general rule is that if they don't respond to your follow up, or they respond with something dickish like that first manager, consider them not interested and move on.

                  I've been there before. Got a read request from an agent whose client roster I really admire, a month later I followed up and he asked for me to resend my samples (even though this was all on the same email thread), and a little over a month later I followed up again but never heard back. Really pained me but just reminded myself that there are plenty of fish in the sea and moved on ...
                  The above is correct. But you need to know, more and more managers, agents, and producers are resorting to what I call The Silent Pass. If you don't hear from them, it's a no. Why? Because too many idiot desperate writers out there take ANY response as an opening for dialogue, writing back... pleading, begging, arguing.... you name it and because of this childishness, now we have The Silent Pass. I've had more than a few producers and a couple of managers tell me this and recounting some hair-raising stories about terminally stupid writers who don't seem to understand the meaning of "no".

                  So, know when you don't hear because it's a pass that it's not personal.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

                    Originally posted by EdFury View Post
                    The above is correct. But you need to know, more and more managers, agents, and producers are resorting to what I call The Silent Pass. If you don't hear from them, it's a no. Why? Because too many idiot desperate writers out there take ANY response as an opening for dialogue, writing back... pleading, begging, arguing.... you name it and because of this childishness, now we have The Silent Pass. I've had more than a few producers and a couple of managers tell me this and recounting some hair-raising stories about terminally stupid writers who don't seem to understand the meaning of "no".

                    So, know when you don't hear because it's a pass that it's not personal.
                    So, here's a question:

                    Totally understand that mentality, but one would think silence would likely generate more emails from passed-over writers, thinking the response was "lost" or just forgotten.

                    But if they take a moment to say, "This was not for me. Thanks for submitting," then - yes - the person might reply with a "why?" or other efforts to convince them - but THAT would be the more appropriate time to give them the silent treatment, as you've informed the writer of your decision and have moved on.

                    This is especially frustrating due to the amount of time it can take to actually get to a script and make a decision - sometimes a year or more. A simple, "Not for me, thanks" would help many hopeful writers not hang onto that year (or more) hoping, every day, they might hear back. Why not just send a quick "no" email to let them off the hook?

                    Anyway, that's just my opinion. I'm glad to hear that most will reach out with a decision.

                    One last question: how the heck do they keep track of all these submissions?? One would think they get so many, they might make a read request and then accidentally let the script fall between the cracks. How are they able to think three months later, "Oh yeah, I told some guy back in November I would read his script. Better get on that"?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Do Managers/Agents USUALLY respond after a full read request?

                      Originally posted by Cokeyskunk View Post
                      So, here's a question:

                      Totally understand that mentality, but one would think silence would likely generate more emails from passed-over writers, thinking the response was "lost" or just forgotten.

                      But if they take a moment to say, "This was not for me. Thanks for submitting," then - yes - the person might reply with a "why?" or other efforts to convince them - but THAT would be the more appropriate time to give them the silent treatment, as you've informed the writer of your decision and have moved on.

                      This is especially frustrating due to the amount of time it can take to actually get to a script and make a decision - sometimes a year or more. A simple, "Not for me, thanks" would help many hopeful writers not hang onto that year (or more) hoping, every day, they might hear back. Why not just send a quick "no" email to let them off the hook?

                      Anyway, that's just my opinion. I'm glad to hear that most will reach out with a decision.

                      One last question: how the heck do they keep track of all these submissions?? One would think they get so many, they might make a read request and then accidentally let the script fall between the cracks. How are they able to think three months later, "Oh yeah, I told some guy back in November I would read his script. Better get on that"?
                      First of all, you need to get to the mental state of, "Send and forget." Let go. 99% of submission is rejection. None of it personal. They don't care enough about you for it to get personal. Rejection is a business decision that can be for hundreds of different reasons, not always about the quality of the script.

                      You also need to know that query submissions go to the bottom of the pile and can stay there for a while as submissions by agents, stars, managers, and other producers have precedence and always will. So, those reads will almost always take longer. You have to practice what I call Strategic Patience. Set yourself a reminder at three weeks to send an Email enquiry if they've read it yet and if you hear nothing, assume it's a pass and move on. Don't dwell on it. Then, if a year later, if you hear something good, and this has happened to be, it's a pleasant surprise.

                      Welcome to screenwriting. This is everyday life.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X